Creating Highly Likely Buyers. Exploding The Chances That They Will Buy From You

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Sales prospects have a deep seated defense against salespeople. And they protect themselves against their desire to buy from you. There are emotional hurtles for them to overcome. There is an inertia in not buying that you need to overcome. Buying is risky. Not buying is safe. Sales prospects put up barriers to buying. Most are unconscious, but they are strong. Here is the idea that will shatter defenses to buying, and make buying from you the only natural outcome of a sales presentation....

Buying is good.

That's the all encompassing idea that you want to present. You create the idea in the prospect's mind that "Buying is good". If you are now thinking "So what?", that's normal. But you are going to really love the next few paragraphs. Trust me.

These very ideas I have used consistently to generate sales to people with strong defenses against buying....with no interest at all in what I was selling. Here are the parts to "Buying Is Good", and how they work.

Past buying decisions were a good idea.

Every person you are talking to in a sales presentation has bought lots of things before they met you. Some were expensive. When any previous purchase comes up, whether it's your product or not, you need to compliment their previous buying decision. Why?

Because Buying Is Good.

If you sell cars and they talk about their current car, compliment something about the car.....you can make it a feature, how popular that model was at the time...the gas mileage...anything. Never criticizes a previous purchase they made. Never. Why? Because if you criticize a previous purchase, you are essentially saying "You shouldn't have bought"...or "Buying is bad".

Even if they say something bad about something they bought before, you can't agree with them. You can say "I don't know. I think if I would have seen what you saw, I probably would have gone ahead and bought it". Reinforce previous buying decisions. Compliment the fact that they went ahead with buying.

Buying is normal

You would be amazed how many people base most of their decisions on what's considered "Normal" to them...in their neighborhood, culture, religion, family, and with their friends. The idea to avoid is that "Nobody buys" or even worse "Nobody buys from me".

When I say "Buying is normal" I specifically mean to impart the idea in the sales prospect's mind that "Buying our product is normal behavior, a normal result.. And buying it at the price we charge is normal".

In the salesperson's mind, it was important that they believed "Buying my offer from me is normal behavior for a sales prospect".

You have to be treating the sale as though it's what normally happens. Don't suddenly act excited, don't act like they caught you by surprise....buying is normal.

Buying the first time they see you is normal. Giving you money is normal. And how do we convey that idea? Here....

Buying what I sell is popular. Buying from me is popular.

Demand is greater than supply, for what I sell. That's the idea that has to be conveyed. At some point early in my presentation, I'd say "You would think my problem was selling these. But my problem is getting them. Our supply keeps running out". Make sure that's true.

The reason referrals from people who have bought from you pay off so well, is they they know someone else that you have talked to, and they also bought. So now...in their mind...buying from you is normal, and your product (or service) is popular.

When a retail clerk says "I think I have one left. Let me go check", why do we get excited, and want what we are looking at...even more? Because we might not be able to get it. We might lose our chance. We might lose out.

Remember, everyone wants two things; 1) What they can't have. and 2) What everyone else has and they don't. When I'm showing a vacuum cleaner in my store, one of the most powerful things I can say is "May I show you the most popular machine we have?". Everyone wants to see it. Why? Because it's popular. If they buy it, maybe they can fit in with their friends better. Maybe increase their social status a bit. Maybe impress someone they care about. And if what you sell is popular, that conveys that it's safe to buy it....or it wouldn't be popular.

Buying is expected.

This means they they get the idea that you expect them to buy. Why? Everyone else is buying, why should you be any different? Don't be pushy. Don't be obvious, but mention a few others that have bought from you, and their experience. Don't mention people who haven't bought from you, but could have. That sends the idea that it's normal not to buy from you.

And it can't be about you. You cannot say "Yes, everyone buys from me because I'm so great at selling". It has to be something like "I'm so fortunate that I can be in a business where everyone wants and needs what I have to offer". "My customers have been very good to me and I sure appreciate it". "The company really treats me well, and they treat our customers really well too, which I appreciate. It makes my job easier". See how these statements convey the idea that buying is normal, expected, painless, and without risk?

Buying is accomplishment.

This one is a little harder. When someone tells you they bought something, let's say a piece of exercise equipment, and they complain that they never used it. You cannot let them feel bad about not using it. Why? Because the idea will linger in their mind (subconsciously) that they won't use what you sell either. So you have to position the purchase alone as an accomplishment on their part. "Sure, most people buy a good piece of exercise equipment, and only use it for a short time...then they feel bad about it...and then they start using it again, that's normal. But you couldn't even decide if you wanted to use the equipment, if you didn't buy it in the first place. Am I right?"


When they start talking about a previous purchase, take the conversation back to the actual buying moment. They say "I love our new boat" (or anything else they ever bought) you can say "Tell me about the day you bought it". You want to dredge up those positive feeling they had about buying that boat. Why? Because Buying IS Good.

And all of this is like a strong wave that carries them through the buying process. Is it everything you need to know? Not by a long shot. But it's an idea that you can adapt and add to any selling situation to dramatically increase the likelihood that they will buy from you. Right now.


Added later; This post, and the material in it, were for both the sales prospect and the sales rep. First, I had to convince the rep that buying was normal, natural, expected, and a popular option.

Then the rep had to show the sales prospect the same thing. Really, this is one of the most advanced and powerful things I could teach a salesperson, that's selling a high end offer.
#buy #buyers #chances #creating #exploding #highly
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  • Profile picture of the author Jamell
    I agree we have to find ways to make the buying experience pleasurable. I am definitely going to incorporate this into my strategy.
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    • Profile picture of the author Claude Whitacre
      Originally Posted by Jamell View Post

      I agree we have to find ways to make the buying experience pleasurable. I am definitely going to incorporate this into my strategy.
      Thank you.

      My post was complex and highly advanced.

      The post isn't about making the buying experience pleasurable, although that's a good idea.

      It's about showing the prospect that buying is the normal thing to do...and that you expect them to buy from you. It greatly changes the dynamic of the selling process.
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  • Profile picture of the author Jason Kanigan
    Thanks for the post, Claude. I'll reinforce that this idea of "Buying is normal" is key.

    Over the years I've built it into many new projects for myself and clients that have never before been sold. As the seller (product creator, service provider, salesperson), if you're sitting there thinking, "I sure hope they don't ask me who else has bought this thing before", you're beaten before you start.

    Getting out of your own head as the seller is vital. You are not your customer. You may need to hear that a thousand times before it clicks. What they're worrying about is NOT what you are worrying about. Make buying normal.
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  • Profile picture of the author misterme
    Always have the mind set that buying is the normal outcome. In fact when they're not buying, it permits me to continue trying to find how to make it work for them... or keep dialing the tumbler as Belfort might say.

    Informing clients as you present as to what others find popular, or prestigious, or most useful, etc., not only taps into the client's psyche but also allows you to pre-empt common objections by giving the "why" along with it.

    Years ago, a client pointed to a product of mine no one had bought that large before. Without thinking, due to surprise, I blurted out, "wow, that's big!" and immediately I realized my blunder. The look on her face as she second guessed her decision! She promptly lowered her order and that cost me $1,200. That's a $1,200 lesson. But, worth it. Years later, someone else pointed to a big product and I didn't blink. That was a $35,000 sale.
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    • Profile picture of the author Claude Whitacre
      Originally Posted by misterme View Post


      Years ago, a client pointed to a product of mine no one had bought that large before. Without thinking, due to surprise, I blurted out, "wow, that's big!" and immediately I realized my blunder. The look on her face as she second guessed her decision! She promptly lowered her order and that cost me $1,200. That's a $1,200 lesson. But, worth it. Years later, someone else pointed to a big product and I didn't blink. That was a $35,000 sale.
      I had a rep once that was having real trouble. She told me that people were very close to buying....nearly every time. But she wasn't selling anything.

      Of course, I asked her what happened, and she told me what I wanted to hear, which of course wasn't close to reality.

      I went with her on an appointment, she did the presentation. They were going to buy. At the end, they asked a question, and she replied "Would you like some time to think about it?' She was going to leave and call them later. Nobody commented on my face turning beet red, or the flames coming out of my nostrils.

      Of course, I stopped her and closed the sale. As soon as they said "OK, we'll get it", she said "Are you sure?".

      They bought anyway, despite the rep......and she had no idea why I kept asking her why she said that. To her, she was just being polite.

      My pulse is speeding up even now, years later, when I think about it.
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      • Profile picture of the author misterme
        Originally Posted by Claude Whitacre View Post

        As soon as they said "OK, we'll get it", she said "Are you sure?"
        Yikes.

        Well, polite or not, I think that reflects their inner money setting temperature. Salespeople like that need to be exposed to Rodeo Drive to where such purchases become normalized.

        Strangely enough, I've heard "are you sure?" suggested as an answer to "no." Supposedly, if you say it as if intoning the customer may be overlooking something, may be making a mistake they're unaware of, it gets the customer thinking they may be making the wrong decision. I can't vouch for this tactic though.
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        • Profile picture of the author Claude Whitacre
          Originally Posted by misterme View Post

          Strangely enough, I've heard "are you sure?" suggested as an answer to "no." Supposedly, if you say it as if intoning the customer may be overlooking something, may be making a mistake they're unaware of, it gets the customer thinking they may be making the wrong decision. I can't vouch for this tactic though.
          Thank you for this.

          I want to address the "Are you sure" question as an answer to objections. If they say "I don't think so" and you say "Are you sure?", you have just cemented in their brain the fact that they are not interested in buying. "Are you sure?' is a "Say Yes" question, in any circumstance. In any conversation. And that "Yes" means a stronger "No".

          How do I know? I was working in a sales office, and they had a wonderful appointment setter that called referrals. These referrals had already agreed to an appointment.

          I watched in horror as she would ask, at the end of her short spiel "Are you interested?".
          And a full 20% that already had agreed to a presentation...would say "Well, no. I'm not really interested".

          And then she would always ask "Are you sure?". And of course, they would say "Yes, I'm sure". And that would be the death of that appointment...forever. She would say it in a friendly conversational manner. A very nice lady.

          One day I asked her "How many times have you asked "Are you sure?" over the years?" She sat a minute and said something like "I don't know, maybe 5,000 times".

          And then I asked "Has anyone ever said "No. I'm not sure"?"

          Nope. Never.

          The obvious question is "Why didn't you fire her?" She was working for another distributor I was working with. She wasn't my employee. And she was a close family friend of theirs. When I told the distributor what she was saying, he got mad that I would question his friend.

          I find it difficult to believe that a rational person in sales would think asking "Are you sure?" would make sense. It would always directly lead to the prospect saying "Yes, I'm sure".

          Instead, when someone gives me an objection, my first reaction is "Oh?" and I say it like I never hear objections at all. And I'm a little offended that they gave one.

          Invariably, they now try to explain their objection to me. Sometimes their objection weakens, but usually it just becomes more clear what they are thinking. And knowing what they are really thinking is my goal.


          Added later;

          Asking "Are you sure?" in a sales context is intuitive. It sounds like regular conversation. Like something a normal person would say. And it is. But in a sales situation, it leads down the wrong path. a dead end path. I know you know all this.

          What we aren't going to read on this thread, I'm pretty sure, is Jason Kanigan or Ken Michaels say "Yup, I ask "are you sure" after I get an objection, and it works".
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  • Profile picture of the author Claude Whitacre
    I should add that the reason I came up with this idea is that I used to hire and train salespeople. They worked out of my office.

    It wasn't hard to train them to sell. It was hard to convince them that people would buy.

    So, I would take a new rep with me, and show them 10 sales. I would make the sale, and they would provide the lead. The whole point was to show them that people actually bought our product, at the price we sold it for, on a regular basis.
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  • Profile picture of the author DABK
    Buying is normal. And even people you mentioned here, who sabotaged the sale, think it is.

    Buying the product or service at the quoted price might not be normal to some people.

    I know, it's been covered. But it must be highlighted.

    I have had problems with it as a seller of things I would never had paid that much for as a trainer as a business owner trying to help other business owners.

    People make the mistake of not putting themselves in the buyer's shoes.

    There are things that help a buyer that would not help the seller the same way.

    I had an appraisal company. When I started, everyone around me was charging $250 for a basic appraisal and they were happy.

    They had been in the business when everything was done by hand. I got in right after things got computerized, automated, streamlined.

    They went from doing a report in 15 hours to doing one in 7 and were happy.

    I started with doing one in 7 hours and thought I could get more.


    The difference between me and them, they looked at how much time they were putting in, I looked at that and what value my buyers were getting out of dealing with me.

    I noticed I responded faster than the norm. In a mortgage closing, getting someone live to answer an appraisal question, or within 1 hour, has a lot of value when compared to getting the answer 24 hours later.

    People thought I was greedy and working with morons.

    They just could not put themselves in the shoes of a loan officer whose closing can be delayed, or tanked.

    I had issues with my appraisers too. They had a hard time telling people we charged $300 for a basic appraisal. For the same reason. They knew we were faster.

    They just did not understand that, to loan officers, waiting a day, mattered enough that they were glad to pay only 50 extra to not wait.
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    • Profile picture of the author Claude Whitacre
      Originally Posted by DABK View Post

      Buying is normal. And even people you mentioned here, who sabotaged the sale, think it is.


      Buying the product or service at the quoted price might not be normal to some people.
      That is one thing I had to overcome. And that's why I would show them ten sales at the price we charged. A new person would believe "Nobody can afford this" or "Nobody will pay that price". I know, because they would say it to me.

      When I said "Buying is normal" that meant "Buying what we are selling, at the price we are selling it" is normal

      What the new rep (and the prospect) had to believe was that it wasn't unusual, or out of the ordinary, for them (the prospect) to buy our product...from them.

      Of course, not everyone bought. We had one offer at one price. I could fit the product to the customer, but the price had to stay firm, especially with referrals.

      What you said was important enough for me to clarify what I posted by adding;

      When I say "Buying is normal" I specifically mean to impart the idea in the sales prospect's mind that "Buying our product is normal behavior. A normal result.. And buying it at the price we charge is normal".

      In the salesperson's mind, it was important that they believed, "Buying my offer from me is normal behavior for a sales prospect.
      "


      I thank you for that.
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