McDonald's Norway displays 'iconic trash' in bid to reduce litterin

by WarriorForum.com Administrator
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A new article on Marketing Dive reports that McDonald's Norway is running an advertising campaign that tackles its role in littering as the largest takeout restaurant in the country.



Print, social media and out-of-home (OOH) ads photographed by Jói Kjartans capture what the brand is calling "iconic trash," where packaging like burger wrappers and soda cups have been left out as unsightly street refuse. Copy reads "take away your take away," reminding consumers to throw out their trash after they've finished their meals.

Developed with agencies NORD DDB, WergelandApenes and OMD, the effort also places waste bins near the OOH placements so that the chain's Golden Arches double as beacons for places to toss trash. TV and online ads amplify the message, while McDonald's has partnered on a pilot project with Keep Norway Clean for further cleanup initiatives.

McDonald's is demonstrating a willingness to show its iconography in a less flattering light to spur customers to cut out littering. The warts-and-all concept recognizes the outsized role takeout plays in pollution. Products like single-use bags and food wrappers make up almost half of manmade waste in seas, researchers have found, while packaging from restaurants is a major culprit in cities.

Beyond the altruism angle, McDonald's views the push as a way to further tidy up its image. People who see the chain's packaging frequently as street rubbish may develop unconscious negative associations with the brand, even as the decision to litter is up to the individual consumer.

"We're responsible for one of the biggest and most visible parts of littering. We're definitely not pleased when we see trash from our restaurants lying around," said Mari Husby, senior marketing manager at McDonald's Norway, in a statement. "With our size and influence, we can do a lot better than we do today."

The campaign tries to provide practical solutions beyond the tut-tutting message, with trash cans placed around OOH ads displaying the signature Golden Arches. The lower leg of the "M" conveniently points downward toward the opening of the bin. Video ads depict paper bags blowing listlessly around in the breeze to plinking piano notes, a likely reference to the film "American Beauty."
#bid #displays #iconic #litterin #mcdonald #norway #reduce #trash
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  • It's going to be interesting to see how this is going to work out. I understand that the message here is to encourage their own customers not to litter. But I don't think shaming the consumer isn't going to make McDonalds look better. When you compare littering to the long list of ethical violations that Mcdonald's does all over the world, they don't really have the right.

    https://querysprout.com/is-mcdonalds-ethical/
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  • Profile picture of the author Jonathan 2.0
    Interesting: Thanks for the article. : )

    Personally -- going from the pictures (etc.) -- I don't see the "appeal" at all. I think it would be a much greater campaign if they did something like: "Let's Work Together To Keep The Streets Clean For Everyone."
    That's just off the top of my head ... However the point is they should be working together with Customers -- rather than just creating "warning" images.

    [Edit=]
    Looking at the images again ... I kind of see the "purpose" and it could be successful. And I suppose it's similar to what I said?

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  • Profile picture of the author Frank Donovan
    Some US readers might not get the reference to "takeaway". That's the term most Europeans use instead of "takeout". Hence the strapline.

    I suspect the ads are more a public relations exercise or an attempted appeasement to local authorities. But given the potential for negative PR, I wonder if a better option would be for McD to employ its own staff to ensure the area around each restaurant was kept free of branded litter.

    Or make the packaging edible. The nutritional content would be about the same.
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    • Profile picture of the author Jonathan 2.0
      Originally Posted by Frank Donovan View Post

      I suspect the ads are more a public relations exercise or an attempted appeasement to local authorities.
      Great point Frank: You could be right -- I didn't consider that.

      Originally Posted by Frank Donovan View Post

      Or make the packaging edible. The nutritional content would be about the same.
      (Haha) ... Can't argue with that.
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      • Profile picture of the author WF- Enzo
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        They're greenwashing. Again.

        Originally Posted by Jonathan 2.0 View Post

        Great point Frank: You could be right -- I didn't consider that.



        (Haha) ... Can't argue with that.
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