Explaining a "Profitable" Website vs. a "Pretty" Website to Your Clients and Prospects

11 replies
As you probably already know, most local business owners are mainly concerned about how "pretty" their websites look when it comes to a new design or re-design.

Sometimes, you can talk until you're blue in the face explaining the importance of having a "profitable" website and they just don't get it. LOL

When I say "profitable," I mean professional, clean layout, strong call to action, email opt-in forms, conversion tools, testimonials, etc.

I take the "educating" approach and do not pressure them into anything. After I explain the benefits, if they still want to do their own thing, I go with it.

At least I've done my part in trying to help them. Besides, it is all about what THEY want. But it is also my job to make sure they at least know how things should be done if they want to generate business with the site.

Depending on the type of business it is, I usually promote lead generation websites because they are set up specifically to get the visitor to contact the business.

Anyway, I met with a new client yesterday - a tax accountant. I explained why a lead generation site would be good for her type of business and she really didn't listen.

She pulled up other websites with all this flash and crazy stuff. I did talk her out of flash thank goodness LOL. But, I'm going to do what she wants.

Anyway, I was just curious as to how others explain the benefits of a profitable website?

Thanks.
#clients #explaining #pretty #profitable #prospects #website
  • Profile picture of the author SubUrbanHype
    The best way I combat that when I am presented with this problem is to breakdown the flashy website, hopefully they pulled up a site that has a call to action, opt-in form and things like that, and explain to them what each part is for. Like the big flash banner is really a call to action to get info and what not. Hopefully they will understand then. Then explain to them if they want that it will cost them in the $1000's... that usually gets em to come around quicker after you explained it lol.
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    • Profile picture of the author MsMotivation1
      yes you are right about this part... when it comes to the really flashy stuff, i tell them "yes, i can do that but it's going to cost $$$$." they quickly change their minds then... well most of them.

      Thanks for your input!

      Originally Posted by SubUrbanHype View Post

      The best way I combat that when I am presented with this problem is to breakdown the flashy website, hopefully they pulled up a site that has a call to action, opt-in form and things like that, and explain to them what each part is for. Like the big flash banner is really a call to action to get info and what not. Hopefully they will understand then. Then explain to them if they want that it will cost them in the $1000's... that usually gets em to come around quicker after you explained it lol.
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  • Profile picture of the author Steve Solem
    Funny - you would think an accountant of all people would understand the difference between a "fancy" website that might get him a few compliments on the looks...vs a website that might actually bring him new clients and put money in his pocket.

    I give you lots of credit for trying to set them on the right path...but there's only so much you can do to change someones point of view and I think you're going about this the right way. Keep 'em happy and give them what they want, but I'd try to sneak some direct response elements in there where you can and show them the benefits over time.

    Cheers,

    Steve
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    • Profile picture of the author Thirty3Down
      I literally bring in my laptop and show them the difference.

      I have a really pretty site that converts like crap.... and I have a real eyesore that continues to get business...

      I Show them the sites and the numbers that go with them. If they can't see the problem, your dealing with some much deeper issues and its best to move on to people that "like making money".

      Good luck and don't let em get you down!
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      Want to see How I'm running a Multimillion dollar online business from a backpack? Follow my journey here.
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  • Profile picture of the author jsherloc
    Many times in the past, when faced with this dilemma and not making much progress either way, I have resorted to my "Paris Hilton" reference. Note: This may not be appropriate for your "formal" meetings and what not, but if they are down to earth and have even a slight sense of humor they will get it.

    "Mr. Biz Owner, the problem that I see with 90% of the fancy animated business websites I come across is that they are basically what I like to call "Paris Hilton" websites. They might be flashy, be very expensive to maintain, and be "pretty" to the audience, but they are pretty much USELESS at everything else....ie: bringing you new clients, making more money for you, building a potential customer lists, etc."

    They seem to chuckle at that one, but they also got the point I was trying to make.

    - Jim
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  • Profile picture of the author FormerWageSlave
    This could be an opportunity to upsell them a little bit. Do both, get paid for both and split test to show them the difference. Let the numbers decide.
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    grrr...

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  • Profile picture of the author mouseffects
    Show them their "pretty" site on a mobile device. If that doesn't scare them nothing will. (and, you can probably get a mobile site job out of it as well).
    Signature

    Larry Perry
    innovedia
    www.innovedia.net

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  • Profile picture of the author uniquemarketer
    Start with asking them what do they want to achieve with their website? If their goal is to have a flashy, fancy site, but no traffic, then they have achieved their goal.

    But if they want a site that has lots of traffic, user friendly, communicates the value proposition, and drive actions, then explain to them why they need a profitable website.
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  • Profile picture of the author peter.max
    I tell them that the most visited and useful website in the world "Google" is not flashy but functional.

    But I can offer them a flashy website if they want. Use WP with a ThemeForest template for $35, outsource the setup and loading their info for $200 and sell it to them at a bargain basement price of $1000. Easy $700 in your pocket. Then include a Aweber signup in the site widgets and charge them another $200 for setup and $xx per month or offer a dedictated mini site for lead gen at your normal rates. Give them a roadmap to buy from you and if it starts with a flashy "WP" site then so be it

    I also sometimes ask how many sales they made as result of their website if they have one. You get a blank stare
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  • Profile picture of the author David
    Originally Posted by MsMotivation1 View Post

    As you probably already know, most local business owners are mainly concerned about how "pretty" their websites look when it comes to a new design or re-design.

    Sometimes, you can talk until you're blue in the face explaining the importance of having a "profitable" website and they just don't get it. LOL

    When I say "profitable," I mean professional, clean layout, strong call to action, email opt-in forms, conversion tools, testimonials, etc.

    I take the "educating" approach and do not pressure them into anything. After I explain the benefits, if they still want to do their own thing, I go with it.

    At least I've done my part in trying to help them. Besides, it is all about what THEY want. But it is also my job to make sure they at least know how things should be done if they want to generate business with the site.

    Depending on the type of business it is, I usually promote lead generation websites because they are set up specifically to get the visitor to contact the business.

    Anyway, I met with a new client yesterday - a tax accountant. I explained why a lead generation site would be good for her type of business and she really didn't listen.

    She pulled up other websites with all this flash and crazy stuff. I did talk her out of flash thank goodness LOL. But, I'm going to do what she wants.

    Anyway, I was just curious as to how others explain the benefits of a profitable website?

    Thanks.
    I tell my clients a website's SOLE PURPOSE in life is to rank in google,
    I tell them a web designer typically writes code to please a human audience, I write code to please Googlebot.
    What good is a Rembrandt of a website if it doesn't perform in Google

    that usually prompts the question "PERFORM in Google?"

    I say "I concede, web designers make prettier websites than mine, mine make the phone ring"

    Who is going to see your masterpiece of a website if it ranks #99 in Google?

    I ask the client: do you ever click past the first page of Google results?

    No one ever types in a company name, you're prospective customers don't know who you are, nor do they care who you are.. they're interested in 2 things and 2 things only: What they're looking for and can I get it locally
    Signature

    David Bruce Jr of Frederick Web Promotions
    Lawyer Local SEO - |

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  • Profile picture of the author RichardHK
    >>When I say "profitable," I mean professional, clean layout, strong call to action, email opt-in forms, conversion tools, testimonials, etc.<<

    I would go one step further and say that profitable just means the end result of conversion = more customers. That's the only metric they should be concerned about.

    I asked a prospect last week how much a new customer was worth to his business in real income, and although he did not have a definite figure, he felt USD1,250 to USD2,500 was about right. With that data you have something very useful to work on, as well as good communication between yourself and prospect.
    Signature

    Richard, Hong Kong
    Business Consulting

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