local keyword research

8 replies
I've heard conflicting reports. I've been using exact match to estimate search engine traffic for particular keywords. But then I saw a video from a WSO that used the broad match. Obviously broad match will return, do I dare say significantly more results (not sure if any statistical sticklers are here). Granted the broad match would be more impressive upon presentation to a prospective client. So what's the real representation of the keyword's search volume?

Broad, Phrase or Exact??

Thanks
#keyword #local #research
  • Profile picture of the author WildGale
    Both.

    Lead with the broad and say something like "that's any phrase with those words such as ....." And then drill down: "But what exactly are users typing in?...." (Describe exact results and perhaps phrase)

    Ph.D. minor in statistics here and not at all offended by your use of "significant." You didn't say "statistically significant after all
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[3163011].message }}
    • Profile picture of the author rafterman
      Originally Posted by WildGale View Post

      Both.

      Lead with the broad and say something like "that's any phrase with those words such as ....." And then drill down: "But what exactly are users typing in?...." (Describe exact results and perhaps phrase)

      Ph.D. minor in statistics here and not at all offended by your use of "significant." You didn't say "statistically significant after all
      Thanks. I just want to give the client a accurate estimate of traffic and calculate the possible amount of customers I could drive in order to calculate my own price bases on projected ROI.

      Minor in statistics? Cool. Although I think I had nightmares about chi squared and ANOVA for a month when I took biostatistics, had to since I was a bio major.
      {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[3163180].message }}
    • Profile picture of the author teaball
      Originally Posted by WildGale View Post

      Ph.D. minor in statistics here and not at all offended by your use of "significant." You didn't say "statistically significant after all
      darn, that is funny! LOL

      I'll add a statixkall lee significant factoid-ophone comment ...

      rafterman,
      Look at the various ISP's available in your area. I deal with this issue all the time. One of my ISP's is connected nearly 50 miles away, another at varying distances on a given day, mostly 5 miles away.

      side by side computers get completely different results with these 2 different locations that gurgle gets as a reference point for the search terms.

      The key is that you have to optimize for just the keyword, like "plumber" for one ISP and "plumber, YourSuburb and State". It's a hassle but if you forget about this, customers get about half of the expected search results.

      I have posted about this before on another thread.

      TB (married to statistical genius & Ph.D too)
      Signature
      The short cut to success is always the long cut for lasting success.
      {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[3163221].message }}
      • Profile picture of the author teaball
        I forgot about this thing I have been using because of the 2 ISP problem I just mentioned.

        I have been using an authority site platform to do much of the ranking, traffic driving stuff for customers. But this will work on the client's site too if you are given access to their stats... which you should demand.

        The traffic stats should give you a referrer url link. I save every one of those url's in a text file. Then about once a month I sort them by keyword or KW phrase. I know their ISP because it's listed also in the stats.

        Now, the anchor text here is the key to getting a click through on the search page. first, I assume most searches are like mine ... I want a phone number to call and order a pizza or call to see when they close, etc.

        So, the anchor text has just enough good KW copy and the beginning of the phone number, but not all of the number is visible, such as (xxx) yyy-z... Enough to know one is just a click away.

        I have schmatistikally tested having the whole number and almost all of it (A/B). No T-tests Result? double the click throughs ... and then I deliver the phone number PROMINANTLY. Yield? it actually results in longer on page stays or that lovely term ... better "stickiness".

        I have meant to share this before, forgot and then the holidays got in the way.

        TB
        Signature
        The short cut to success is always the long cut for lasting success.
        {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[3163365].message }}
        • Profile picture of the author rafterman
          Originally Posted by teaball View Post

          So, the anchor text has just enough good KW copy and the beginning of the phone number, but not all of the number is visible, such as (xxx) yyy-z... Enough to know one is just a click away.
          So you're saying in Google Places and or website, make it:

          <a href ="url.com">555-55</a>55 ???
          {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[3163474].message }}
          • Profile picture of the author teaball
            Originally Posted by rafterman View Post

            So you're saying in Google Places and or website, make it:

            <a href ="url.com">555-55</a>55 ???
            Yep, essentially that way they can see a number is just a click away on the link...

            I always try to think like I am the dumbest internet guy who might be searching for this. That's because i read the book "don't make me think" several years ago, and have re-read it.

            The more I learn, the less I know, the more I learn.
            TB
            Signature
            The short cut to success is always the long cut for lasting success.
            {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[3164094].message }}
      • Profile picture of the author rafterman
        Originally Posted by teaball View Post

        The key is that you have to optimize for just the keyword, like "plumber" for one ISP and "plumber, YourSuburb and State". It's a hassle but if you forget about this, customers get about half of the expected search results.
        How do you optimize for ISP?
        {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[3163452].message }}
        • Profile picture of the author teaball
          Originally Posted by rafterman View Post

          How do you optimize for ISP?
          I treat it as a completely separate optimizing situation, then combine the two as best as I can.

          It means that the town/suburb has to be given more weight for the SEO on the remote ISP connection. Am getting much better at it. i use the search phrasing seen in the stats and work from there.

          TB
          Signature
          The short cut to success is always the long cut for lasting success.
          {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[3164073].message }}

Trending Topics