Before you go selling your services, DO THIS!!!!

by man5
25 replies
Whether it's through e-mail or on the phone, if you are not talking in a proper manner to the potential client, you are going to lose him/her..it. What you need are proper scripts planned out(and now them from heart) that will get your client's attention and keep him focused and interested!
It's almost as if, it's not really much about the service itself, as it is about the game.


Do you agree with that statement?

Discuss.
#selling #services
  • Profile picture of the author FivestarHB
    I agree a script is essential - so that accuracy can be maintained, and the professional sales approach taken. As much as I hate the pre-prepared script when i receive an unsolicited phonecall, I understand doing it.

    Even in the professions, having a script written out in front of you is handy for "hard" phone calls, it keeps you on track, and delivers the intended message.
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  • Profile picture of the author Charlotte Jay
    Well, yes I do agree. Know what you're talking about before you close your client. Fortunately my clients come looking for me already wanting what I offer, so there's not much wheeling and dealing on my end.
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    • Profile picture of the author sgcattent
      Originally Posted by Charlotte Jay View Post

      Well, yes I do agree. Know what you're talking about before you close your client. Fortunately my clients come looking for me already wanting what I offer, so there's not much wheeling and dealing on my end.
      You speak of my dream Charlotte! Lol, I have yet to really have a client come to me, any freindly tips on how you go about this? And yes I have about 6 WSO's on Offline lead generation, all of which have helped, but not had clients just plain come looking for me. If they did then my face would be like this ! Lol.
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  • Profile picture of the author EliteIM
    One of the aspects one looks at before hiring someone is credibility, and a decent, professional pitch is one way of building some of it.
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  • Profile picture of the author Alexa Smith
    Banned
    For email marketing, one clearly needs pre-written, edited, tested and proven "scripts".

    For telephone marketing, I think "scripts" are, for many people, a useful part of the learning process, and especially helpful with "having something to say and not freezing up", when they're new to it.

    Experienced and successful telemarketers certainly tend to be the ones who rely on them least, and are actually capable of having a "proper conversation".

    Most of the telemarketing cold-calls I get (typically from people selling double-glazing, kitchens, a whole range of financial services, loft conversions and all this sort of stuff) seem to be made by people in their first day of a new job, and it's terribly obvious that they're reading from a script. I suspect that this is because the turnover of telemarketing staff is extremely high, such positions typically being filled on a commission-only basis, and their employers taking on as many people as possible knowing that most of them will drop out, through disillusionment, during their first week or month in the job.

    It seems to me that the huge drawback of "reading from a script" is that people doing so, and especially the great majority who are new in the job, don't listen.

    I'm inclined to think that a "script" should be a short-term crutch, used only to get people started who are unfamiliar with the territory.
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    • Profile picture of the author TPFLegionaire
      Originally Posted by Alexa Smith View Post

      For email marketing, one clearly needs pre-written, edited, tested and proven "scripts".

      For telephone marketing, I think "scripts" are, for many people, a useful part of the learning process, and especially helpful with "having something to say and not freezing up", when they're new to it.

      Experienced and successful telemarketers certainly tend to be the ones who rely on them least, and are actually capable of having a "proper conversation".

      Most of the telemarketing cold-calls I get (typically from people selling double-glazing, kitchens, a whole range of financial services, loft conversions and all this sort of stuff) seem to be made by people in their first day of a new job, and it's terribly obvious that they're reading from a script. I suspect that this is because the turnover of telemarketing staff is extremely high, such positions typically being filled on a commission-only basis, and their employers taking on as many people as possible knowing that most of them will drop out, through disillusionment, during their first week or month in the job.

      It seems to me that the huge drawback of "reading from a script" is that people doing so, and especially the great majority who are new in the job, don't listen.

      I'm inclined to think that a "script" should be a short-term crutch, used only to get people started who are unfamiliar with the territory.


      not quite...

      The above sound like a fair conclusion to a personal observation, however , speaking from someone who has done door to door sales for many years, sold advertising space over the phone and been employed as an inside sales person in IT (mostly phone work) , I can assure you that as an experienced sales person you have a script (or a system, a pattern ...whatever you may want to call it).
      The difference is that having been honed over hundreds of conversations it become delivered in such a "natural" way that it becomes indistinguishable from a "normal" conversation

      The overall tactics and strategies that you adopt to deliver your sales pitch (the script) is not suddenly brought to an end after a certain time doing it to move into something completely different that non sales people call a "normal" conversation. What happened is that the sales person has acquired enough experience in his field to be able to deliver a script with a high degree of relatedness to the prospect.

      When you think about it, there is also the circumstances in which the pitch is being delivered that might bring to the attention of the prospect the fact that someone is being sold via a script.

      Imagine a conversation where you are called by someone and that person explain that they are looking for a couple of houses in your street to have double glazing installed at a much reduced price in order to serve as a showcase for their products, and would you be interested in being one of them?

      This script delivered over the phone is unlikely to pass the test of a "normal conversation" in your head and you have every reason to believe that person is delivering a script with your answers triggering a range of scripted responses.

      Now imagine having the same conversation with someone you have just been paired with on a golf course. They could be delivering the exact same script as per the previous telesales person but because of the circumstances , this has now become part of a "conversation".

      Same script , different circumstances and perception.

      So, whenever you are in a situation where you are being sold something, I can pretty much guarantee that the salesperson is following a script. The same overall patterns and triggers can be identified by the knowledgeable observer watching the sales person over time pitching to different people.

      Listening, was mentioned as a key attribute of the experienced sales person and that is correct, again, part of the successful delivery of a sales pitch is the ability to listen to your prospect and relates to what they say.

      And then as an experienced professional you are able to deliver a "scripted" response (a response that you know to be appropriate for this particular circumstance ) that you take from your professional knowledge.
      A newbie may not be able to deliver this smoothly enough and may need to get their clue for their script not from their brain but a piece of paper or a screen prompt.These are "script users" easy to spot indeed


      All sales people use scripts, some may not acknowledge it , some (a lot!) use poorly constructed and performing scripts and at the beginning , the delivery of whatever script is likely to be sub optimal...

      But that's ok...practice make perfect


      Regards.
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      • Profile picture of the author johninmn
        Originally Posted by TPFLegionaire View Post

        not quite...

        The above sound like a fair conclusion to a personal observation, however , speaking from someone who has done door to door sales for many years, sold advertising space over the phone and been employed as an inside sales person in IT (mostly phone work) , I can assure you that as an experienced sales person you have a script (or a system, a pattern ...whatever you may want to call it).
        The difference is that having been honed over hundreds of conversations it become delivered in such a "natural" way that it becomes indistinguishable from a "normal" conversation

        The overall tactics and strategies that you adopt to deliver your sales pitch (the script) is not suddenly brought to an end after a certain time doing it to move into something completely different that non sales people call a "normal" conversation. What happened is that the sales person has acquired enough experience in his field to be able to deliver a script with a high degree of relatedness to the prospect.

        When you think about it, there is also the circumstances in which the pitch is being delivered that might bring to the attention of the prospect the fact that someone is being sold via a script.

        Imagine a conversation where you are called by someone and that person explain that they are looking for a couple of houses in your street to have double glazing installed at a much reduced price in order to serve as a showcase for their products, and would you be interested in being one of them?

        This script delivered over the phone is unlikely to pass the test of a "normal conversation" in your head and you have every reason to believe that person is delivering a script with your answers triggering a range of scripted responses.

        Now imagine having the same conversation with someone you have just been paired with on a golf course. They could be delivering the exact same script as per the previous telesales person but because of the circumstances , this has now become part of a "conversation".

        Same script , different circumstances and perception.

        So, whenever you are in a situation where you are being sold something, I can pretty much guarantee that the salesperson is following a script. The same overall patterns and triggers can be identified by the knowledgeable observer watching the sales person over time pitching to different people.

        Listening, was mentioned as a key attribute of the experienced sales person and that is correct, again, part of the successful delivery of a sales pitch is the ability to listen to your prospect and relates to what they say.

        And then as an experienced professional you are able to deliver a "scripted" response (a response that you know to be appropriate for this particular circumstance ) that you take from your professional knowledge.
        A newbie may not be able to deliver this smoothly enough and may need to get their clue for their script not from their brain but a piece of paper or a screen prompt.These are "script users" easy to spot indeed


        All sales people use scripts, some may not acknowledge it , some (a lot!) use poorly constructed and performing scripts and at the beginning , the delivery of whatever script is likely to be sub optimal...

        But that's ok...practice make perfect


        Regards.
        TPF- I am inclined to think that Alexa meant the same thing you did. I took it that she was essentially saying that you need to learn your product and hone your pitch to be able to apply it in whatever environment you are in.
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      • Profile picture of the author Jay Rhome
        Originally Posted by TPFLegionaire View Post

        The above sound like a fair conclusion to a personal observation, however , speaking from someone who has done door to door sales for many years, sold advertising space over the phone and been employed as an inside sales person in IT (mostly phone work) , I can assure you that as an experienced sales person you have a script (or a system, a pattern ...whatever you may want to call it).

        The difference is that having been honed over hundreds of conversations it become delivered in such a "natural" way that it becomes indistinguishable from a "normal" conversation.
        Exactly. I'm experienced. I obviously know what I want to offer. My script still helps in simply BEGINNING (which is often the hardest part), and in saying the best sentences at first for maximum impact.

        And yes, I know it so well that my tone is right, I'm relaxed, it doesn't feel like a script, and I can listen.

        Sure, a newbie might take 100 calls to not sound like a robot, but it's still a great tool.

        As for sales being a numbers game, well it is. Why deny it? If you are in referred markets, if people come to you, if you have a reputation, it's a lot more fun, and the ratio (aka numbers) of closes is way higher than cold calling. But it IS a numbers game.

        Cold calling can be seen as inefficient in the ratio, but since you can get the volume and the speed (aka do it NOW without much preparation) it's still pretty efficient, though obviously not the preferred way for 99% of the people, myself included!
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      • Profile picture of the author GCooper
        Very, very true.

        -G
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  • Profile picture of the author ecoverbox
    Although a script is probably a good way when you are new at it, it doesn't mean that you actually have to "read" from the script. You can actually make it sound like a natural conversation (as much as possible).

    Does anyone have scripts that actually convert? Would be great to share what works and what does not...
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  • Profile picture of the author abhi1
    Totally agreed with Alexa.
    Apart from email marketing & telephone marketing, one needs to be have
    effective communication skills for a proper customer support desk.

    This is the decade of Social Media and it's all about mouth-to-mouth marketing.
    If you're not good at after sales support, people are not going to be interested
    in your services.

    I've been into webhosting & software sales business for over 24 months now and
    I have to say, people who take refund from me are also the people who recommend
    me to others only because of my support services. It does really counts...
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    • Profile picture of the author entrepreneur16507
      One of the best telemarketing companies uses not only scripts to sell the products, but scripts to do everything. So if a telemarketer has to answer the main phone and make an appointment with a person looking for a job interview, etc. they know exactly what to say.
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  • Profile picture of the author gvannorman
    I agree that you need to sound professional and actually know what you are talking about. A script may ease the nerves if your a bit shy. I also feel that it takes a personable approach to really seal the deal. We have all heard the spammy sounding sales calls. We just hang up or at least I do. But, if the person on the other end is interacting with me, I tend to stay on the phone a bit longer and listen to them. So, a script is okay but in the long run you need to ad lib and interact with the other person to get them to listen and buy what your selling.
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  • Profile picture of the author Headfirst
    It all depends on how long you've been doing it, your background, skills and abilities.

    I think scripts sound canned and dont work. When I start calling on a new product or service I make some bullet points and put them on index cards that I lay out on my desk. By the end of the first day I no longer need them, but they help on the first day.

    I've been selling B2B for about 14 years though and I have no problems talking to a client. Others may need the script.
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  • Profile picture of the author Creativegirl
    You have to understand what you're selling "to" them vs. what you're actually selling. We solve problems, save them money, grow their business, etc.
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  • Profile picture of the author Danial09
    selling own products or even using affiliate, you must be professional in praparing your script and we will get no success if we dont have good strength of script to force them into actioin
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  • Profile picture of the author Rus Sells
    Scripts are great when your playing the numbers game. Many people view sales as a numbers game. While sales is a numbers game to a point, scripts tend to make us view each new person we speak to as a "pitch" instead of a person.

    This is the most basic problem with scripting the sales process. I just need to read this piece of paper enough times to enough people and I will get some sales.

    This isn't sales, this is purely a numbers game and when playing a numbers game your always going to get a certain number of yes's versus no's. This isn't selling its mindless drone work.

    When I get a phone call from a company selling me something, the first thing I do is listen to what the person is saying. The very second I ascertain that the person is reading a scripted pitch I just hang up the phone.

    Well sounds rude right? I think its rude that my intelligence is insulted by a company that thinks I will buy their product by being read a script over the phone.

    I want to have a conversation not be spoken or read too. Don't you?
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    • Profile picture of the author Randy Miller
      Scripts are a powerful tool that have helped me close a higher percentage of sales then I would have had I not been using the script.

      But after a while, say 50 or 75 times of using the script I like to make a change. Once I've used the script enough times to have it really memorized, I distill it down to a checklist with 5 - 7 - 10 key points. I leave in the opening sentence just as a reminder, but then I just have a conversation, making sure that I touch on the key points of the checklist.

      So long as I remember to cover the hot buttons on the checklist, my closing percentage remains high and I have more fun while "conversing" with my prospect.
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  • Profile picture of the author Ryan57
    Very much agree.
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  • Profile picture of the author DavidT12
    I would agree that a script can be helpful, particularly when you are just starting out, but I would also emphasise the need to build rapport with whoever you are speaking to.

    By that, I don't mean asking how they are or about their wife and kids but not really being interested in the answer.

    What I mean is that you should ask them about the problems they face related to your business so that you can build empathy and really help them.

    You need to build trust, and a script on its own is not enough for that.
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  • Profile picture of the author ileneg
    IMHO - it's okay to have & use a script...BUT at the same time you don't want to sound "scripted". Make sense?

    ileneg
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    • Profile picture of the author MRomeo09
      I'm a firm believer IN scripts. There are too many reasons why they work.

      You often hear salespeople with years of experiences saying they don't need a script. But, in my experience a good script book is one of the most powerful things you can develop.

      A script book should be a living breathing document. It should change according to changes in your offering, and new approaches that have been found to work. But having a script isn't so much about having every word that the person says mapped out, it's about the flow, the process. For instance I've found in many service businesses that most people want to know the price of a service before we know what they need, and they know what we offer. If you state price right out of the gate, you lose most of the time. So part of my "script" is a hard and fast rule that no discussion of price until at a very minimum 120 seconds into the conversation.

      Let me give an example, we had a particular type of service call in my primary business where we were losing 40% of our calls. That was unnaceptable, until we defined a selling story that was designed from the ground up to counter most of the issues that we heard time and time again. Using that story we turned what once was a major hole in our processes to one of the strongest areas.

      It takes practice and work to deliver a script efficiently but when done correctly can be very powerful.

      In my primary business the average competitor closes between 20-50% of incoming calls. I know this because I also do lead gen for other companies outside of the 8 major metropolitan areas we service. Uniformly they are bad, bad, bad. I can take a young kid of the street, and in one day of training he can be closing 60%. And within one month that same kid can be closing around 90% of the incoming calls. That allows me to do a lot of things others can't do like I can afford to pay much higher prices for PPC, etc.

      I've tested and scripted every part of the sales experience. Did you know that answering on the second ring versus the first ring bumps up conversion 9%. How would you know unless you measured and "scripted" the experience?

      We scripted out the voice mail when we just can't get to the phone quick enough. We used to have around 20% leave messages, now we average 72%.

      It all comes down to a 63 page script book that we've created that is the best in the business.

      My staff is not allowed to vary far from the script. They know it works, and they are constantly trying to find better scripts.

      I incentivize conversion rates, and bonuses to the best addition to the script book monthly. We have a weekly script book meeting. We listen to recorded calls to find the best deliveries. I bonus the best conversion of the week, etc.

      If you study Dan Kennedy(you should). He'll tell you that his stage pitch when he was doing speaking was OBSESSIVELY scripted, down to the very moment he would take a sip of water. And in doing that he was one of the highest grossing producers on the Peter Lowe events, even though he was uniformly one of the least known there.

      If you're serious about business you'll build scripts. If you're serious about getting better, you'll examine every "failure", and try to find the nugget of inspiration for next time.

      At least that's the way I see it.

      Marcos
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  • Profile picture of the author Tim Hoogasian
    Scripts are to 'sales' what recipe books are to 'cooking'.

    Have you ever seen a master chef using a cookbook recipe?

    On the other hand, nobody starts out as a master chef, and the masters probably can't tell you anymore how to cook some great dish... they've been doing it so long it's become ingrained in them so they honestly aren't being coy, they just can't tell you anymore... they "just do it".

    Even so, cold-calling on the phone with a script makes you SOUND like you're canned scripted, and you won't be able to answer questions that fall outside of your script so you come across as an amateur sales-critter which is a turnoff that gets a "click" (line goes dead).

    I'd much rather someone else do the calling than me, I'm much more of an "in-person" kind of guy where people can see that I know what I'm talking about and it's a lot less socially-acceptable to rudely walk away. (Of course, I'm not a hard-sell kind of guy anyway, I'm all about friendly teaching; so that factor doesn't hit me anyway.)
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  • Profile picture of the author kld
    I think having a script is critical to success no matter what level your experience is. You may not say the exact same speech in the exact same way to every person you talk to, but you need to deliver the same basic message each time.

    Just because you may not describe your business or services in the same words to everyone, doesn't mean you don't have a script.

    I don't have a written script that I use, but I do have a list of bullet points that I want to touch on with the people I talk to. It helps me not forget anything that's important and it helps me not stumble if I get distracted or off track for some reason. I also don't always deliver my talking points in the same order or with the same words to everyone - I do let a conversation take it's natural course.

    I use the same bullet points for initial phone conversations and for early face to face meetings to potential clients. I want to be sure I'm being consistent in every interaction and I don't care if my client sees me looking at notes. I believe it sends the signal that I'm organized and that completeness is important to me. If someone finds a problem with this, then we aren't going to be a good match in the long run, anyway. I'm okay with that.

    So, maybe the script isn't a formal sounding speech, but it's the complete statement you want potential clients to hear.
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    • Profile picture of the author Ghostinthemachine
      Yes. I also sell offline and know my topic well. I can deliver it in a natural sounding manner- that is very important.
      I did a lot of telemarketing in high school, and you get to the point where you are n longer "scripted"... which is when sales go up.
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