Business doesn't have a website and STILL not interested! ARGH!

by eshber
17 replies
Hey guys,

I've made a number off calls now to businesses that don't even have websites, and they're STILL not interested...

Most of the responses I get is 'We're an established firm and get most of our business from repeat customers or referrals'...

I must be doing something wrong...maybe im not being pushy enough?
#argh #business #interested #website
  • Profile picture of the author Jimian
    When you show em (or tell 'em) they're losing out to their COMPETITORS (like when people type in their kind of business online in their location) then they're more apt to listen.

    But yeah, doing THAT over the phone is tough. There's better ways...
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  • Profile picture of the author Trivum
    Originally Posted by eshber View Post

    I must be doing something wrong...
    Well, I would say they're the ones who are doing something wrong, but I get your point.

    I think you just have to look for a glimmer of interest on their part. If it seems they might be open to listening, then you can develop a "next line" to say to them. See if the interest increases a little more.

    If they aren't interested, then drop them and move on without another thought. We all do things that are against our better interests all the time. People change when they're ready to change. You're not going to make them change.
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  • Profile picture of the author John Durham
    Originally Posted by eshber View Post

    Hey guys,

    I've made a number off calls now to businesses that don't even have websites, and they're STILL not interested...

    Most of the responses I get is 'We're an established firm and get most of our business from repeat customers or referrals'...

    I must be doing something wrong...maybe im not being pushy enough?
    How many numbers have you dialed...?

    Much like PPC, if it isnt 3 or 400 yet, then you cant really judge whether you are doing good or bad.
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  • Profile picture of the author Rus Sells
    See, I am the kind of person what would turn around and get a domain name, install wordpress quickly, slap up some relevant content and then put that businesses information with a different phone number so I can track the calls. Have a HUGE call to action to mention the company name and web site for a discount or something when calling!

    I'd wait until they got their first two or three calls and then call them back. Nuf said.

    I know right? Some of you would not like this tactic but hey this is me.



    Originally Posted by eshber View Post

    Hey guys,

    I've made a number off calls now to businesses that don't even have websites, and they're STILL not interested...

    Most of the responses I get is 'We're an established firm and get most of our business from repeat customers or referrals'...

    I must be doing something wrong...maybe im not being pushy enough?
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[3395165].message }}
    • Profile picture of the author Nevin McQ
      Rus,

      I like this tactic and I am going to assume their is nothing illegal about this.

      So what we are doing is having their business information on our Page One listing and receiving the calls ourselves? We then are passing these calls to the target customer in question?

      If this what I am reading?

      Originally Posted by Rus Sells View Post

      See, I am the kind of person what would turn around and get a domain name, install wordpress quickly, slap up some relevant content and then put that businesses information with a different phone number so I can track the calls. Have a HUGE call to action to mention the company name and web site for a discount or something when calling!

      I'd wait until they got their first two or three calls and then call them back. Nuf said.

      I know right? Some of you would not like this tactic but hey this is me.
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      • Profile picture of the author MerlynSanchez
        Originally Posted by Nevin McQ View Post

        Rus,

        I like this tactic and I am going to assume their is nothing illegal about this.

        So what we are doing is having their business information on our Page One listing and receiving the calls ourselves? We then are passing these calls to the target customer in question?

        If this what I am reading?
        It may be illegal or at least can get you in trouble with your hosting company if the client complains. It's certainly unprofessional.

        You may get away with it if it's a small company or not very savvy. But stay clear of anyone who values their reputation. People don't appreciate being impersonated.

        I would never do business with someone who did this.
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  • Profile picture of the author Nathan Alexander
    Also keep in mind it's not for lack of opportunity to get a website either.

    They're certainly aware they could "have a website" and you can bet you're not the first to pitch them on it. At that point, assuming they "do" need a website it doesn't matter a bit if they're convinced they don't.

    It's an uphill battle you don't have to fight.

    You don't want to waste valuable time trying to convince someone who doesn't want to be convinced. Go looking for people who "get" the need for an online presence and get the need for marketing in general. Those people are looking (many times without knowing it) for someone to help them take it to the next level.

    They want an authority that can guide them and prove themselves to help them with their business via whatever channels you can provide results for. Those folks may want an update to their sites done by you.
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    • Profile picture of the author marciayudkin
      Most of the responses I get is 'We're an established firm and get most of our business from repeat customers or referrals'...

      I must be doing something wrong...maybe im not being pushy enough?
      Yes, you're doing something wrong: chasing potential clients who are the least interested ones in what you are selling. It is much easier to sell a business that has a site on a better web site than a business that believes it doesn't need one. Even those who have a very successful site are more likely to want help than those who don't have a site at all.

      Marcia Yudkin
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      • Profile picture of the author ElaineBaker
        We all experience this problem but what these companies don't realise is that anytime they could "dry up" for whatever reason.

        Maybe telling these businesses about certain "busy" businesses that have been in the news of late, some businesses a few years down the line were so busy they probably would've said the same thing, and where are they today.... gone into liquidation - there have been many large companies that this has happened to.

        Search Google and look for some in your area that are no longer trading and quote that to these businesses next time they say they are tooooo busy.

        That will certainly give them food for thought, and even though they may not sign up straight away, don't forget to leave your biz card, cos I'm sure some will be on the phone to you within a short time.

        Elaine
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      • Profile picture of the author MerlynSanchez
        Absolutely! You're doing double the work because you have to sell them on the need for a website and then sell them on hiring you.




        Originally Posted by marciayudkin View Post

        Yes, you're doing something wrong: chasing potential clients who are the least interested ones in what you are selling. It is much easier to sell a business that has a site on a better web site than a business that believes it doesn't need one. Even those who have a very successful site are more likely to want help than those who don't have a site at all.

        Marcia Yudkin
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    • Profile picture of the author joshril
      Originally Posted by Nathan Alexander View Post

      Also keep in mind it's not for lack of opportunity to get a website either.

      They're certainly aware they could "have a website" and you can bet you're not the first to pitch them on it. At that point, assuming they "do" need a website it doesn't matter a bit if they're convinced they don't.

      It's an uphill battle you don't have to fight.

      You don't want to waste valuable time trying to convince someone who doesn't want to be convinced. Go looking for people who "get" the need for an online presence and get the need for marketing in general. Those people are looking (many times without knowing it) for someone to help them take it to the next level.

      They want an authority that can guide them and prove themselves to help them with their business via whatever channels you can provide results for. Those folks may want an update to their sites done by you.
      Agreed. There are enough "yes's" out there and people that do want and need to a website... No point in worrying about the no's. Some will, some won't... next!

      Originally Posted by DanRMorris View Post

      I think you're selling the wrong thing. No one needs a website. People need revenue. People who have revenue need automation and quality of life.

      The goal in offline marketing isn't to sell websites, it's to create wealth for small businesses. He's right - they're doing just fine without a website.

      Consider a bowling alley that is doing just fine without a website. Friday nights and weekends are their big nights. Weekdays suck. And in winter . . . .argh. What if on snowdays they could e-mail everyone the night before and invite the kids in to bowl - Free Shoes!

      They may even have a list -but what if they could grow that list without doing any work? What if the only people who signed up were people searching for bowling on-line?

      They could potentially sell out the bowling alley every snowday when kids are out of school.

      Nobody needs a website. People need revenue. Learn their business before you call - and then call with some revenue generating ideas that you could help implement.
      Dan makes a great point as well! Provide true value and the sales take care of themselves.
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  • Profile picture of the author MichaelHiles
    I don't have a big web presence for my consulting. I've got channel relationships with partners that feed me more business than I can ever handle, and I've operated that way for years. There's a waiting list of those who want my consulting.

    I realize this is a difficult concept for marketing types that are web exclusive folks, and don't necessarily understand the food chain of marketing function and tactics (or specifically where a website fits into that food chain), but there really are businesses that have no need for a web presence.

    A client of mine is a software company, $10 million a year in sales. Up until 2005 they had a website that looked like it was generated by a Frontpage template. Today, their website is pretty sparse, and really says nothing at all.

    Why? They are exclusively a government contractor and derive 100% of their business responding to RFPs. A web presence has zero bearing on their contract acquisition, and never will. The only purpose that it might serve is giving potential competitors ideas about what they do. They have maybe 20 clients total that generate $10-12 million per year in sales through long term support contracts of 5 years or even longer. The CEO is worth $50 million cash liquid, so you going to waltz in and tell him how he really needs your services and if he doesn't bow to your marketing greatness, he's going to go bankrupt?

    It's pretty narrow of a focus that imposes one's own, very limited worldview onto a business that really may not need your services.
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    • Profile picture of the author Nathan Alexander
      Originally Posted by MichaelHiles View Post

      I don't have a big web presence for my consulting. I've got channel relationships with partners that feed me more business than I can ever handle, and I've operated that way for years. There's a waiting list of those who want my consulting.

      I realize this is a difficult concept for marketing types that are web exclusive folks, and don't necessarily understand the food chain of marketing function and tactics (or specifically where a website fits into that food chain), but there really are businesses that have no need for a web presence.

      A client of mine is a software company, $10 million a year in sales. Up until 2005 they had a website that looked like it was generated by a Frontpage template. Today, their website is pretty sparse, and really says nothing at all.

      Why? They are exclusively a government contractor and derive 100% of their business responsing to RFPs. A web presence has zero bearing on their contract acquisition, and never will. The only purpose that it might serve is giving potential competitors ideas about what they do. They have maybe 20 clients total that generate $10-12 million per year in sales through long term support contracts of 5 years or even longer. The CEO is worth $50 million cash liquid, so you going to waltz in and tell him how he really needs your services and if he doesn't bow to your marketing greatness, he's going to go bankrupt?

      It's pretty narrow of a focus that imposes one's own, very limited worldview onto a business that really may not need your services.
      ...And there is that.

      (Are you telling me that that CEO doesn't need to be ranked #1 for a Google Places search too?...Now what will some folks do?)
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  • Profile picture of the author Nevin McQ
    Some businesses are really happy with the amount of customers they have and what there referrals are bringing in for new customers.

    See depending what type of business it is more business (customers) costs money to maintain. Maybe the business owner is happy with their income and other factors.

    It really depends what the business is and the cost.

    How are you selling the website? Not everyone needs to be on the internet.

    The best thing for you to do is move on to clients who actually want your services.

    Originally Posted by eshber View Post

    Hey guys,

    I've made a number off calls now to businesses that don't even have websites, and they're STILL not interested...

    Most of the responses I get is 'We're an established firm and get most of our business from repeat customers or referrals'...

    I must be doing something wrong...maybe im not being pushy enough?
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[3399411].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author DanRMorris
    I think you're selling the wrong thing. No one needs a website. People need revenue. People who have revenue need automation and quality of life.

    The goal in offline marketing isn't to sell websites, it's to create wealth for small businesses. He's right - they're doing just fine without a website.

    Consider a bowling alley that is doing just fine without a website. Friday nights and weekends are their big nights. Weekdays suck. And in winter . . . .argh. What if on snowdays they could e-mail everyone the night before and invite the kids in to bowl - Free Shoes!

    They may even have a list -but what if they could grow that list without doing any work? What if the only people who signed up were people searching for bowling on-line?

    They could potentially sell out the bowling alley every snowday when kids are out of school.

    Nobody needs a website. People need revenue. Learn their business before you call - and then call with some revenue generating ideas that you could help implement.
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    Dan R Morris
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    • Profile picture of the author Mahara Adhe
      Originally Posted by DanRMorris View Post

      I think you're selling the wrong thing. No one needs a website. People need revenue. People who have revenue need automation and quality of life.

      The goal in offline marketing isn't to sell websites, it's to create wealth for small businesses. He's right - they're doing just fine without a website.

      Consider a bowling alley that is doing just fine without a website. Friday nights and weekends are their big nights. Weekdays suck. And in winter . . . .argh. What if on snowdays they could e-mail everyone the night before and invite the kids in to bowl - Free Shoes!

      They may even have a list -but what if they could grow that list without doing any work? What if the only people who signed up were people searching for bowling on-line?

      They could potentially sell out the bowling alley every snowday when kids are out of school.

      Nobody needs a website. People need revenue. Learn their business before you call - and then call with some revenue generating ideas that you could help implement.

      Awesome post! Just because they don't want a website, doesn't mean that you don't have something of value to offer them. The best process, that I've seen, is to learn about and show interest in their business...ask questions..pay attention to where they could improve...and then tailor your response/pitch and services to those areas.
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