Got An Appointment, What Should I Bring To It

12 replies
Hi all,

Besides my success last week, I actually got an appointment setup for tomorrow Tuesday 3/15/11.

It's for re-doing a clients website and was curious to know what I need to take with me as this is my actual first appointment.

Any help would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks,

South Bay Bones
#appointment #bring
  • Profile picture of the author Will Perkins
    Originally Posted by southbaybones View Post

    Hi all,

    Besides my success last week, I actually got an appointment setup for tomorrow Tuesday 3/15/11.

    It's for re-doing a clients website and was curious to know what I need to take with me as this is my actual first appointment.

    Any help would be greatly appreciated.

    Thanks,

    South Bay Bones
    Print out a copy of their site, take a laptop, along with anything you need to seal the deal on the spot (I'm not sure if you already have or not).

    You want to show him what you're redesigning, also have a reason WHY you are redesigning 'element A' rather than leaving it as is.
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  • Profile picture of the author Ryan Shaw
    Don't bring a powerpoint!

    You can bring any samples of your previous work or just simply talk man to man.

    Then, deliver to them a proposal after your first meeting.

    Sometimes, you can sell them something right there such as a FB Fan Page or Website. Go back for the monthly retainers and marketing.
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    • Profile picture of the author Will Perkins
      Originally Posted by Ryan Shaw View Post

      Don't bring a powerpoint!

      You can bring any samples of your previous work or just simply talk man to man.

      Then, deliver to them a proposal after your first meeting.

      Sometimes, you can sell them something right there such as a FB Fan Page or Website. Go back for the monthly retainers and marketing.
      Completely forgot to mention that. Ryan nailed it, definitely don't bring a powerpoint or anything like that.

      This is face to face, so you have to keep the conversation active and engaged.
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  • Profile picture of the author John Durham
    Just take a note pad and a pen. Look at the clients site beforehand, make notes. Go in and talk to him. Let him show you his site on his pc if you have to look at it. Be conversational and relaxed. Let him talk about how the last web guy traumatized him... and BE THE SOLUTION - EMPATHIZE. Let it end with... "okay what do I have to do to get started..." ? Get a little more info for the site, give him your contact info, and say "Okay i guess all I need is a check"... BAMMO!
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    • Profile picture of the author iamchrisgreen
      Don't forget that your meeting is all about the customer.

      Establish why it is that you are meeting him and how you can help him. What are his issues? Why do they need a site? Is it to generate more leads? Why do they need more leads? What effect will what you do have on their business... (you get the idea).

      In an ideal meeting, the client will be doing the majority of the talking. There's a saying in the business world "telling isn't selling", so stay clear of taking in powerpoints and other necessary stuff.

      Someone said about taking in previous examples or testimonials. Me personally, I would send those before the meeting. This is called "social proof" and it helps them know that you are not a fly by night company before they meet you.

      The big thing is that he likes you and trusts you, so be attentive and be genuine.

      Good luck and I hope it goes well.
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  • Profile picture of the author FreeBird85
    Make sure to bring an invoice, when they give you a check they'll probably want an invoice for their records
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  • Profile picture of the author AllanWard
    I'd take in a list of questions to ask. Before you start showing your work, find out more about the client.

    Why does he have a web site? What does he want from it? What traffic does it get? What does he like about his web site? What doesn't he like? What knowledge does he have of marketing on the internet? What services is he looking for from you? What other services can you offer that he doesn't even know he needs?

    When you're selling a service, it takes a while to build up trust. Listening to your client is a great way to do this.
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  • Profile picture of the author tonyscott
    To echo John, notepad, pen and two ears. Ask him to show you a few sites that he does like the look of. Regardless of how well you build the site, what will make him happy initially is how it looks.

    Tony
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  • Profile picture of the author krikkod
    Bring your nizuts

    I've always done well following 3 things:
    - Good presentation, in appearance and speech (use big words wherever you can so you sound like a pro - which no doubt you are - just look tidy - you don't need a suit but a polo and jeans with clean shoes is great - and wear your spectacles if you have them - makes you look smart)

    - The meeting must have a purpose - once acheived leave and don't meander - they have s*** to do - and so do you (even if you don't - hanging around just looks like you're not a real business dude)

    - Take a book for notes and actually take notes (this shows that you are listening, and above all clients dig that the most)
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    • Profile picture of the author Jim Guererro
      First bring yourself there on time and prepared. Pretty much common sense here but first impressions last forever. Looks like the appointment was for today but it will still be interesting to see how you did during the interview.

      Being prepared by even going into the historical aspect of their website by looking at whois.net and finding out as much information definitely helps to validate what the client is telling you. If I was the client I would be duly impressed if you came to me and knew when I created the website at least, where I have the domain registered too and other pertinent information.

      Let the client dictate the direction of the conversation in the beginning and find out what their goals are. Once you have this basic information you would be able to take charge and give your vision of what can happen given the proper SEO and marketing advantages that you can offer.

      I'd like to know how everything went with you,
      Jim
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  • Profile picture of the author John Callaghan
    competitive information

    Easiest way to motivate a business owner is to show them how one of their competitors is ahead of them.
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    "I am the master of my fate: I am the captain of my soul."
    from Invictus by William Ernest Henley

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    • Profile picture of the author Dillinger411
      Run their website through WooRank. Chances are they will take a big thorough dump all over the website and then present yourself as someone that can build a website with none of these problems right outside of the box.
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