R and R (Rejections and Rebuttals)

39 replies
I've been cold calling for what seems like an eternity(barely a year) and I think I have heard almost every stand off, excuse, rejection, etc and business owner could ever think of.

I rarely get something that I haven't heard of a thousand times and by now it's like a broken record every time I hear a prospect leaning towards a rejection. I've gotten a pretty much automated brain when it comes to hearing rejections and throwing out immediate rebuttals that makes prospects re-think their doubts. I built this rejection proof dialogue over months and months of cold calling. I don't remember anyone ever talking much about what rejections to expect and how to overcome them.

So this is why I made this thread, in hope to get as many common rejections us Offliners are prone to hearing out in the open so people just getting started will be prepared for when a prospect stumps them with a rejection.

If we all contribute the most common rejections we've experienced from business owners and how we handled the rejection, I'm sure this thread will turn into a very useful resource to get people comfortable with rejections before they are faced with them.

In addition if you have any rejections you are expecting to hear and you want to have your response ready to go, just let us know here and I or someone else(hopefully) will try to help you get a rebuttal ready.

So I guess I'll contribute a few of my most commonly heard rejections in a few minutes.
#rebuttals #rejections
  • Profile picture of the author bob ross
    Arron, great idea for a thread I'm sure it will help a lot of people.

    In your experience, what was the most difficult objection for you to overcome and how have you learned to overcome it?
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    • Profile picture of the author areevez
      Originally Posted by bob ross View Post

      Arron, great idea for a thread I'm sure it will help a lot of people.

      In your experience, what was the most difficult objection for you to overcome and how have you learned to overcome it?
      The first thing that comes to mind is, "I've got more business than I can handle." Still to this day, I haven't really found a way to get around that. It's just like they're saying, "I dont need you, and I dont want you." So it's kind of hard to fight through that one. I remember one specific time where an auto repair place used the same line, then he said, "You know anybody that I can hire? Then maybe we can talk." Only if I was into headhunting as well, I'd be in the money!

      I used to try to fight through it, but today, I just move on to someone who can handle new business. If they don't even want new business then why would I even waste any more time? That's MY JOB.
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      • Profile picture of the author zmxn73
        Originally Posted by areevez View Post

        The first thing that comes to mind is, "I've got more business than I can handle." Still to this day, I haven't really found a way to get around that. It's just like they're saying, "I dont need you, and I dont want you." So it's kind of hard to fight through that one. I remember one specific time where an auto repair place used the same line, then he said, "You know anybody that I can hire? Then maybe we can talk." Only if I was into headhunting as well, I'd be in the money!

        I used to try to fight through it, but today, I just move on to someone who can handle new business. If they don't even want new business then why would I even waste any more time? That's MY JOB.
        Sorry if someone has already said this in the thread, but a solid statement in return when you hear this is "well our services provide ongoing steady business, so if you have periods of poor sales performance our services will provide much stronger cash flow and steady sales for your business" - now obviously this won't work if the business is truly seasonal such as someone who's business centres around Christmas, snow etc. However normally most businesses will experience down turns in their sales at generally specific times.

        You can then say to businesses that any business they get in strong sales periods can be sent elsewhere, until sales down-turns kick in.
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      • Profile picture of the author TyBrown
        Originally Posted by areevez View Post

        The first thing that comes to mind is, "I've got more business than I can handle." Still to this day, I haven't really found a way to get around that. It's just like they're saying, "I dont need you, and I dont want you." So it's kind of hard to fight through that one. I remember one specific time where an auto repair place used the same line, then he said, "You know anybody that I can hire? Then maybe we can talk." Only if I was into headhunting as well, I'd be in the money!

        I used to try to fight through it, but today, I just move on to someone who can handle new business. If they don't even want new business then why would I even waste any more time? That's MY JOB.
        You hit the nail on the head. Ethical sales is all about a win-win. If someone doesn't have need of extra business then you selling to them would more than likely be a win-lose.

        Spin Selling by Neil Rackham is a great sales training book for how to not have to deal with ever using rebuttals.
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  • Profile picture of the author TheCG
    The top most common objections I get are, curiously, "I have more business than I can handle with out (whatever you are selling)" and "Business has been so slow I can't afford (whatever you are selling)."

    I hear the 2 of those quite often. It is really strange with it being the same type business in the same city.
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    • Profile picture of the author areevez
      Originally Posted by TheCG View Post

      The top most common objections I get are, curously, "I have more business than I can handle with out (whatever you are selling)" and "Business has been so slow I can't afford (whatever you are selling)."

      I hear the 2 of those quite often. It is really strange with it being the same type business in the same city.
      Exactly, the first one, I just mentioned in my previous post. For me, it's THE worst rejection to surface. Not many ways around someone who doesn't even want more business.

      As for your second one, that's a prospect that really wants some help. They'd be an easy sale, if they could afford you. For this situation, I tell them, "So, I understand that you would love to do something to get out of this funk and drum up more business if you could afford it, right?"

      They usually feel some kind of hope after hearing that, which brings back interest.

      If it's about the money, you just have to find a way around it, provide services for them in return for value OTHER than money, until you help their business and the can afford to pay you cash. Obviously nobody likes doing things for free, especially with all the investments you'd have to put up, but there are ways to get value out of your prospects without having cash involved.

      Bartering is a good example, prospects would be much more likely to sign on with you if you offer some kind of barter instead of cash. This isn't always the best thing to do, but there is times where you can get much more value from a barter than an actual cash payment.

      There are other ways to get a lot of value from prospects without cash being involved, just can't exactly get into it right now.
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    • Profile picture of the author reactiontm
      Originally Posted by TheCG View Post

      "I have more business than I can handle with out (whatever you are selling)"
      So at the end of the day, we either have a productivity problem, or a profitability problem.

      Which is it?

      [Both can be solved through better marketing, BTW.]
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      • Profile picture of the author David Miller
        In advertising sales, "I have more business than I can handle" is something that's heard quite often. Besides the fact that it is an incredibly ignorant statement, I've either ignored it and just continued on as if it wasn's said, or, depending on the "vibe" I may say:

        That's a great problem to have. I wish I could say the same thing about my business, I guess I've got a lot to learn....sounds like you may be the guy to teach me. If you could point to one thing that really pushed your business to the top, what do think it was?

        OK, he knows he's lying, I know he's lying, but you might be surprised what comes out of this. It's usually pretty amusing, and it's all BS, but it restarts the conversation, and sometimes that's enough to get where you want to go.

        What you want to do is ignore the fact that he's feeding or fed you a line of BS, that's not going to make the sale. Be a diplomat and never let him know that he's been caught in a lie.
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        • Profile picture of the author areevez
          Originally Posted by David Miller View Post

          If you could point to one thing that really pushed your business to the top, what do think it was?
          Hilarious, it would be amusing to hear some responses to that. Can't wait for the next person to use that rejection...gonna be fun.
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        • Profile picture of the author TheCG
          Originally Posted by David Miller View Post

          In advertising sales, "I have more business than I can handle" is something that's heard quite often. Besides the fact that it is an incredibly ignorant statement, I've either ignored it and just continued on as if it wasn's said, or, depending on the "vibe" I may say:

          That's a great problem to have. I wish I could say the same thing about my business, I guess I've got a lot to learn....sounds like you may be the guy to teach me. If you could point to one thing that really pushed your business to the top, what do think it was?

          OK, he knows he's lying, I know he's lying, but you might be surprised what comes out of this. It's usually pretty amusing, and it's all BS, but it restarts the conversation, and sometimes that's enough to get where you want to go.

          What you want to do is ignore the fact that he's feeding or fed you a line of BS, that's not going to make the sale. Be a diplomat and never let him know that he's been caught in a lie.
          I answered with something close earlier this week. The gal then went on to tell me about how they have been in business for 30 years and word of mouth, blah, blah, blah.

          Trust me, it didn't restart anything about her.

          But I do see where you are going. I should keep trying that and see what happens.
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          • Profile picture of the author David Miller
            Originally Posted by TheCG View Post

            I answered with something close earlier this week. The gal then went on to tell me about how they have been in business for 30 years and word of mouth, blah, blah, blah.

            Trust me, it didn't restart anything about her.

            But I do see where you are going. I should keep trying that and see what happens.
            Well the fact is, and we all know it, nothing works all the time. (Except of course, the "How I Made $43,287 While I Took a Shower With a Simple Google Loophole" WSO)

            Thing is that we deserve to have a little fun too when some of these knuckleheads throw that BS our way. I've gotten that response too from time to time when I dazzle them with that BS question.

            Now I know some people would tell us to take that response and turn it into a referral. I suppose you could do that, but I wouldn't bother. To MY way of thinking, only an idiot would say something like that, and birds of a feather, as they say

            I'll do things like that just to keep my head from exploding sometimes. If it works, great, if not, who cares. Let's face it, in the big picture none of what we're doing here is all THAT important. So why spend so much time struggling with morons when there are bright and ambitious business people that we may catch on the next call.

            I've actually said this quite a few times and you can use this with just about any objection:

            "My boss told me that someone might say something like that, can you hold on for a couple of seconds? I lost my place in the pitch and I can't find what I need to tell you."

            Truth is that on a couple of occassions they've just laughed and I managed to move past it on to a close.

            A couple of them told me to take an airial coitus and hung up. Not a great loss, but gotta have a little fun on my side of the phone too.
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  • Profile picture of the author amulektwo
    Objections is very normal, what you need to do is make a list of objections that you have been receiving and make up a rebuttal that is suited for the objections.
    It is better to study the objections first before delivering the rebuttal.

    Hope this helps!
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  • Profile picture of the author amulektwo
    Objections is very normal, what you need to do is make a list of objections that you have been receiving and make up a rebuttal that is suited for the objections.
    It is better to study the objections first before delivering the rebuttal.

    Hope this helps!
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  • Profile picture of the author David Miller
    @ - op

    Originally Posted by areevez:

    I've been cold calling for what seems like an eternity(barely a year) and I think I have heard almost every stand off, excuse, rejection, etc and business owner could ever think of.

    No one could possibly be cold calling for this length of time without having some measure of success, or being a complete masochist. So when seeing your thread, I'm sure I'm not alone in being anxious for your input.

    I rarely get something that I haven't heard of a thousand times and by now it's like a broken record every time I hear a prospect leaning towards a rejection. I've gotten a pretty much automated brain when it comes to hearing rejections and throwing out immediate rebuttals that makes prospects re-think their doubts. I built this rejection proof dialogue over months and months of cold calling. I don't remember anyone ever talking much about what rejections to expect and how to overcome them.

    Your experience only serves to prove what many of us have thought which is that repitition provides the opportunity to create effective course corrections. I'm anxious to see some examples of how you've done this. I'm sure it could be helpful to all of us interested in cold calling.

    So this is why I made this thread, in hope to get as many common rejections us Offliners are prone to hearing out in the open so people just getting started will be prepared for when a prospect stumps them with a rejection.

    Great idea, and truly the purpose of this forum, to share ideas and information with one another.

    If we all contribute the most common rejections we've experienced from business owners and how we handled the rejection, I'm sure this thread will turn into a very useful resource to get people comfortable with rejections before they are faced with them.

    A couple of us have already shared an example and you have shared one.

    In addition if you have any rejections you are expecting to hear and you want to have your response ready to go, just let us know here and I or someone else(hopefully) will try to help you get a rebuttal ready.

    I see the one that you've submitted is one that you've been unable to work through for all this time. Glad that a couple of us could give you some thoughts on that.

    So I guess I'll contribute a few of my most commonly heard rejections in a few minutes.

    Looks like the "students" are doing all the teaching here. Come on now, if you've been doing this for a year, you've got something to share, don't you?
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    • Profile picture of the author areevez
      Originally Posted by David Miller View Post

      @ - op

      Originally Posted by areevez:

      I've been cold calling for what seems like an eternity(barely a year) and I think I have heard almost every stand off, excuse, rejection, etc and business owner could ever think of.

      No one could possibly be cold calling for this length of time without having some measure of success, or being a complete masochist. So when seeing your thread, I'm sure I'm not alone in being anxious for your input.

      I rarely get something that I haven't heard of a thousand times and by now it's like a broken record every time I hear a prospect leaning towards a rejection. I've gotten a pretty much automated brain when it comes to hearing rejections and throwing out immediate rebuttals that makes prospects re-think their doubts. I built this rejection proof dialogue over months and months of cold calling. I don't remember anyone ever talking much about what rejections to expect and how to overcome them.

      Your experience only serves to prove what many of us have thought which is that repitition provides the opportunity to create effective course corrections. I'm anxious to see some examples of how you've done this. I'm sure it could be helpful to all of us interested in cold calling.

      So this is why I made this thread, in hope to get as many common rejections us Offliners are prone to hearing out in the open so people just getting started will be prepared for when a prospect stumps them with a rejection.

      Great idea, and truly the purpose of this forum, to share ideas and information with one another.

      If we all contribute the most common rejections we've experienced from business owners and how we handled the rejection, I'm sure this thread will turn into a very useful resource to get people comfortable with rejections before they are faced with them.

      A couple of us have already shared an example and you have shared one.

      In addition if you have any rejections you are expecting to hear and you want to have your response ready to go, just let us know here and I or someone else(hopefully) will try to help you get a rebuttal ready.

      I see the one that you've submitted is one that you've been unable to work through for all this time. Glad that a couple of us could give you some thoughts on that.

      So I guess I'll contribute a few of my most commonly heard rejections in a few minutes.

      Looks like the "students" are doing all the teaching here. Come on now, if you've been doing this for a year, you've got something to share, don't you?
      Yeah well, I'm scattering my opinions throughout the thread instead of just typing up my entire rejection sheet in the OP, I wanna give some others a chance to pick up on the thread. I'll be coming in and giving r&r's from my list and/or answering anyone's question about a rejection or rebuttal. Yes, I started this thread to start a conversation and help, I didn't exactly start this thread to give the tell all to rejections and rebuttals.

      And trust me, I'm doing just fine.
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      • Profile picture of the author David Miller
        Originally Posted by areevez View Post

        Yeah well, I'm scattering my opinions throughout the thread instead of just typing up my entire rejection sheet in the OP, I wanna give some others a chance to pick up on the thread. I'll be coming in and giving r&r's from my list and/or answering anyone's question about a rejection or rebuttal. Yes, I started this thread to start a conversation and help, I didn't exactly start this thread to give the tell all to rejections and rebuttals.

        And trust me, I'm doing just fine.
        Didn't suggest you weren't
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        • Profile picture of the author MegaC
          Originally Posted by David Miller View Post

          Didn't suggest you weren't
          Seems like a preface for an upcoming WSO to me...
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          • Profile picture of the author David Miller
            Originally Posted by MegaC View Post

            Seems like a preface for an upcoming WSO to me...
            Wouldn't be the first time that the content of a WSO was essentially the reprint of a thread from this forum.

            Time will tell. Hope you're wrong but it's rare to lose a bet when you bet the worst that can happen.
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  • Relevant: Seth's Blog: Why lie?

    Prospects (people like us) lie in many situations, because when we announce that we''ve made the decision to hire someone else, or when we tell the pitching entrepreneur we don't like her business model, or when we clearly articulate why we're not going to do business, the salesperson responds by questioning the judgment of the prospect.

    In exchange for telling the truth, the prospect is disrespected.

    Of course we don't tell the truth--if we do, we're often bullied or berated or made to feel dumb.

    Is it any surprise that it's easier to just avoid the conflict altogether? Of course, there's an alternative, but it requires confidence and patience on the part of the seller and marketer.

    Someone who chooses not to buy from you isn't stupid. They're not unable to process ideas logically, nor are they unethical or manipulated by others. No, it's simpler than that:

    Given what they know and what they believe, the prospect is making exactly the right decision.
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  • Profile picture of the author Eddie Spangler
    My favorite line in this whole thread thus far comes from David Miller
    So why spend so much time struggling with morons when there are bright and ambitious business people that we may catch on the next call.

    Honestly if I, you or who ever keep this in mind whenever we start getting stuck and turning blue while trying to convince some knuckle head why they can benefit from such and such then our collective stress levels will go down.

    If there is one thing that I can suggest is to qualify hard and as quickly as possible that they not only want more/better business but that they are open to new ideas.
    If they are not already sold on the idea that they need help in some way then its a much harder struggle to get them to buy your idea. HInt..Just because they agree to meet with you in itself is not necessarily confirmation of such.

    The hard part for us is to get over our OWN EGO because we KNOW that we can help the majority of small biz owners and have this NEED to prove something.

    This is one of the biggest mistakes good people make is trying to help people who neither value what you offer or just dont the passion anymore in what THEY do.

    Think of rebuttals as a way to guide peoples OWN thought processes to get them to see your proposition from a different light/poiint of view and not as THE HAMMER that is going to force them to sign on the line that is dotted.
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  • Profile picture of the author Michael Bucker
    @ David Miller, bother you remind me of a few people I know one of them being my cousin who happens to be named David Miller as well. You are a machine my friend. I love reading your responses and input.


    To this thread, I like the idea of where you are going with it. I would like to add a challenge. Instead of just good rebuttals, how about adding proactive statements or questions that both bring up the objections and handle them before the clients use it to create a gap.


    If this is done right, two things happen. First it disarms the prospect. Second it can create instant rapport.


    If we know what they are going to say before they say it why are we waiting to get slapped in the face with it. Why not handle it proactively before it comes up.


    If you bring it up first you control the momentum of it. If they bring it up first you become the standard reactive salesperson.


    This is an art but there are warriors on here I know are capable of it. This technique will be a bit harder for newbies than it will for veterans.


    For those wondering if this works. I use this technique all the time in face to face cold calling. I am a sales trainer and have taught it successfully to hunderds of sales people.

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    • Profile picture of the author David Miller
      I would like to get a little input on this:

      "I don't need (whatever you may be selling), all my business is word of mouth"

      This objection is similar to "I've got all the business I can handle" in a number of ways. Most particularly they have the fact that they are both BS in common.

      The problem with these kinds of objections is that they can not be "overcome" with any kind of logic since they are baseless in every sense. Trying to apply a logical reply only leads to more ridiculous claims by the prospect.

      For example, being told either of these statements you could reply with a statistically proven statement:

      On average a business will lose 10% of it's anual revenue each year due to attrition, relocation, and death.

      So what could a prospect say once you've just told them that. They will try to prove you wrong, that doesn't help either party. They can say something to increase the level of BS such as:

      "My customers never will buy from someone else for any reason, will never move out of town, and will never die."

      Not about to pretend I have any answers to this particular objection, but I know we've all heard it.

      Any ideas how to deal with it?
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      • Profile picture of the author TheCG
        David, I had a guy today that was so hell bent on not buying that he flip flopped back and forth between having too much business and not having enough.

        It was really comical so I took a page from your book and asked him, "So I am confused here. Are you saying that you have too much business or not enough business because you have made both statements."

        He replied, "Well, a little of both."

        hahaha........

        We finally wrapped things up with him telling me that he "needed to ask his wife."
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        • Profile picture of the author David Miller
          @TheCG - Some of these people are stunning in their hypocracy!

          When I did face to face, when I set an appointment I would further qualify by asking them if they liked what they saw, were they in a position to make a decision. Of course, I made the statement with a bit more elegance.

          The reaction could be interesting. A lot of them would say "do you expect me to make a decision on the spot?" I would just respond with, when would you think is a better time? I would also be very clear that a yes was as good as a no.

          I wanted them to understand that I was going there with every intention of having them make a decision.

          I know some may want to jump in and say it's my job to sell them once I'm there. But if someone is afraid to make a simple decision such as a request for a yes or no, they either are not the actual decision maker or had every intention of "thinking it over" and that's just a waste of time. (In my book)

          It weeded out a lot of people who would have done what that prospect did to you.

          It's pretty simple to do the same thing in phone sales as well.
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      • Profile picture of the author beeswarn
        Originally Posted by David Miller View Post


        "My customers never will buy from someone else for any reason, will never move out of town, and will never die."

        Not about to pretend I have any answers to this particular objection, but I know we've all heard it.

        Any ideas how to deal with it?
        This is one of the those times when you just excuse yourself and make the next call.
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        • Profile picture of the author areevez
          Originally Posted by beeswarn View Post

          This is one of the those times when you just excuse yourself and make the next call.
          I'd love to hear someone pull something out of their a$$ for this. I just had this happen to twice already this morning. Owners who just think they are the best at everything. It's like pulling teeth, convincing these people to thing otherwise.

          Seriously, if your arguing with your wife about a disagreement. Your not gonna win if they have a lot of pride.

          I think that's the problem with this one rejection. No matter what we say, pride in these prospects doesn't allow them to hear a word.

          Anyway, some good info in this thread, I'm coming back to list my top 3 rejections other than the above in a few.
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          • Profile picture of the author econnors
            Originally Posted by areevez View Post

            I'd love to hear someone pull something out of their a$$ for this. I just had this happen to twice already this morning. Owners who just think they are the best at everything. It's like pulling teeth, convincing these people to thing otherwise.

            Seriously, if your arguing with your wife about a disagreement. Your not gonna win if they have a lot of pride.

            I think that's the problem with this one rejection. No matter what we say, pride in these prospects doesn't allow them to hear a word.

            Anyway, some good info in this thread, I'm coming back to list my top 3 rejections other than the above in a few.
            You can always use the old "feel, felt, found" rebuttal on them...

            I understand how you feel, Mr. Prospect. Many of the clients I work with now felt the same way when I first spoke with them, but what they found is that their business isn't "bulletproof." You have two choices - deal with whatever your business "throws" your way or take control and really OWN your path to success. You like to be in control, don't you?

            If they don't like to be in control...they are really unworthy of your time, and you should immediately hang up the phone and run screaming from the room...
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            • Profile picture of the author payoman
              You know, I found the more I tried to logically reason with prospects over the phone, the more frustrated I got.

              I am no professional phone salesman, but I find it hard to believe you can win a "Nope, not interested" over with a few rebuttals.

              My system is pretty simple.

              "Have you thought about a website at one point?"

              If they say "maybe/yes", continue.

              If they say "no/not interested/too much work/dont spend money on advertising" or anything except "ummm, maybe" or "yes", HANG UP.

              I seriously hang up on them most of the time, with a very quick "OK Thanks!"

              Using this method, I made 4.8k sales in the last 2 weeks over 500 calls. And my prices are pretty low (5 page site for $600 + $360 for hosting), so if you are charging more, double that.

              **** it, why waste time trying to argue your way into a sale, when you can be on the next call?

              But as I said, I'm no expert. I just know that out of all my clients, not ONE was anywhere near a "NO" that turned into a "YES". They were all at LEAST maybe/yes.
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  • Profile picture of the author chicka
    Originally Posted by areevez View Post

    I've been cold calling for what seems like an eternity(barely a year) and I think I have heard almost every stand off, excuse, rejection, etc and business owner could ever think of.

    I rarely get something that I haven't heard of a thousand times and by now it's like a broken record every time I hear a prospect leaning towards a rejection. I've gotten a pretty much automated brain when it comes to hearing rejections and throwing out immediate rebuttals that makes prospects re-think their doubts. I built this rejection proof dialogue over months and months of cold calling. I don't remember anyone ever talking much about what rejections to expect and how to overcome them.

    So this is why I made this thread, in hope to get as many common rejections us Offliners are prone to hearing out in the open so people just getting started will be prepared for when a prospect stumps them with a rejection.

    If we all contribute the most common rejections we've experienced from business owners and how we handled the rejection, I'm sure this thread will turn into a very useful resource to get people comfortable with rejections before they are faced with them.

    In addition if you have any rejections you are expecting to hear and you want to have your response ready to go, just let us know here and I or someone else(hopefully) will try to help you get a rebuttal ready.

    So I guess I'll contribute a few of my most commonly heard rejections in a few minutes.
    rejections in sales are very normal. just be confident and always emphasize the FAB (features and benefits) of your products/ services you are offering. try to make a rebuttal atleast 3x. if customer is still undecisive, give him/ her time, make call back arrangements. make them feel that you fully understand them in making a decision of buying something and and don't make them feel that you're just another telemarketer who just want to hit his/ her quota for the day. don't sound like you're just really after their money.
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    • Profile picture of the author rjhartl
      I love the idea for this thread!

      So not hijacking the OP's thread, but Monday is going to be my first full day cold-calling. I've done everything I could possibly do not cold call, and I'm doing it no more! I even just started a part-time gig as a telemarketer at a home-remodeling place JUST so I could build up the confidence/know-how to start doing it for my own business...how pathetic is that? Figure I would get paid to acquire the necessary skills and be FORCED to do it so I couldn't wiggle out of it.

      To get back on track though, I was thinking about two of the objections that I saw posted with no real rebuttals.

      "I've already got more business than I can handle" and
      "I get all of my business through word of mouth"

      So I was thinking about something like this...(obviously not tested but curious on your thoughts)

      "Well Mr. XXXX, the way that I look at it is having a website is like hiring both a 24 hour receptionist as well as a 24 hours salesman for just one small one-time payment. So if you really don't need any help getting new customers in the door than that's great, but how many times a day do you find yourself (or receptionist) answering the same old questions?...

      What time are you open till? Do you do BLANK? Do you offer a warranty?etc.

      Wouldn't it be smart to have a single place that answers all of those repetitive questions so that you can save yourself hours on the phone every month? So even if you don't need the salesman half of the website, you can still SAVE yourself a ton of money/time every month in lost productivity and hassle. That seems like a pretty smart move right?

      Not only that, but you'll also be increasing your overall customer experience too! And all of that for just a one time investment that should pay for itself in Blank

      *Hourly wage X Hours of lost productivity time - Website cost = Break-even point*

      Thoughts?
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  • Profile picture of the author YasirYar
    Whether you’ve been selling for a day, a week, or a number of years, you know that whenever you make sales calls, there are objections. But objections are really your opportunity to sell. They give you a chance to focus on the major issues that concern your prospect, and turn them to your advantage in order to make the appointment and later the sale. An objection has to be treated as a hurdle. You must know how you plan to turn around each objection you face.
    In a lot of seminars and trainings that I’ve joined for telemarketing, I’ve encountered common objections that come up again and again. We’ll be discussing them here; if you’ve been selling for a while many may be quite familiar. Look closely at these and at the ways you can jump each of these hurdles.
    You know I'm glad to discuss this with you sometime, I am busy right now.
    Mr. Jones, it’s not my intent to inconvenience you. I’m not going to waste your time; I don’t have a lot of time anyway. I’ll be as brief as possible. If you don’t like what you hear, please stop me and I’ll get out of your way, ok?
    I am not sure. I am not interested at this time.
    You know something, maybe this is not for you but let me just ask you one more question and I’ll get out of your way. If I can show you a service that you and I will benefit each other, would you give it any consideration?
    I am not interested and I am satisfied with our marketing right now.
    I can appreciate that. You know something some of our clients told me exactly the same thing until we had a chance to discuss them all the ways we could save time and money by allowing you the advantage of being in front of the customers in your market area. Mr. Jones, if you allow me let us set an appointment at the place of your business to discuss this in a little more detail. Tomorrow afternoon at 2 o’clock, is that a good time for you?
    Send me an email or literature.
    We don't send out materials Mr. Jones, instead I’m glad to explain it to you now on how we can (benefits) while saving time and money, I’ll be as brief as possible and if you don’t like what you hear I’ll be the first person to advice you to pass on this. Fair enough?
    The client gives you resistance on the money.
    1. I can appreciate that. I know it's not about the money. Let me ask you this, have you ever bought something and you knew you can't afford it? If you want it badly enough you get it, is that right? If you believe and see how you benefit by (benefits), you're going to invest for it, you get it.
    2. I can appreciate that. Is the money the only thing standing in the way? If you have the money would you get started? Well if you believe and see how you benefit by (benefits), you will somehow find a way to do this, like maybe you can borrow the money or let’s put it your credit card. If you really what to do this, you will do those things. It’s not really about the money, right?
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  • Profile picture of the author Steve Faber
    Objection: I have to much business already.

    Overcome With: Now I understand that you may have all the customers you can work with right now, but what if I could show you how to actually handle more business, so you could make more money, whether you use my marketing services, or not?

    Objection: I'm running so lean now, I'm barely making it, and don't think I can afford you.

    Overcome with: You'd be surprised. First, we have very flexible payment options, so we can help you increase your business to the point where you can not only afford us, you'll be begging us to keep working with you.

    Once you discover how much this helps your business, and how little it costs in comparison, you'll never let us leave. Many of our clients say they don't know how they got along without us, and many of them were struggling when we first started working with them, too.
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    • Profile picture of the author racso316
      Originally Posted by Steve Faber View Post


      Overcome With: Now I understand that you may have all the customers you can work with right now, but what if I could show you how to actually handle more business

      Can you expand on that?
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      • Profile picture of the author Steve Faber
        Originally Posted by racso316 View Post

        Can you expand on that?
        This, you'll need to have a business background for, but many folks here do, or be able to outsource the required expertise.

        Offer them management and productivity consulting.

        "Mr Owner, having more business than you can handle is a great problems to have. Most owners I've spoken to would love to have it. We offer management and productivity consulting that can not only help you make all that work you're doing now even more profitable, but let you take on more customers who are looking for exactly what your company is so good at.

        I'll come by and we can discuss how we begin the review process. I have some time available Wednesday morning, Wednesday evening, or Friday afternoon. Which of those would work best for you?"

        Now you have to be able to eiter offer said consulting services, or find a company that you can outsource to. I am fortunate enogh to have such resources available to me. A relationship with a consulting firm is another great avenue to bring in business, though. They constantly find clients in their management consulting business who need what we do. If that relationship is good, it is a very nice win-win for both you and the consultant.
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  • Profile picture of the author beeswarn
    Post #9 by David Miller is gold. So is #24 by TheCG.
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  • Profile picture of the author Colin Fox
    Some great stuff here.

    As soon as an objection comes my way (which is pretty much 90% of the time!), I say that's not a problem. This puts the prospect at ease, and then you come out with your benefits again (USP.)

    A good way to start a call (after you've introduced yourself) is to say that you know that such and such is a problem in their particular industry (you can get problems in all industries by going to the trade websites and doing a bit of research. You just pick companies in the same industry to call that day (manufacturers for example.) Just mention that the trade website states this is a problem and if they are finding the same thing. Then show how your product or service solves these problems and how they can increase they're revenue.

    After this you'll get the objections (how many sales calls go perfectly!) As with the "I'm already too busy", I say that's not a problem, I only work with small/medium businesses that can handle extra growth and from what your saying it's that you're not in a position to handle an increase in revenue at the moment. Is that correct?

    If they still say yes - That's great - however, if you do find that in the coming months your revenue is decreasing, you have my number, save it in your phone, I then give my name, company, my USP again and tell them to have a great day - maybe see you in the future for a chat. Sometimes there's just no helping some people...
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  • Profile picture of the author chicka
    In order to give out good rebuttals you have to learn their rejections.. Research for answers and consolidate it and use it for the future.
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    • Profile picture of the author nyk24
      Just found this great thread as I wanted to find some good rebuttals to get over common caller objections.

      Although there were some great rebuttals 90% of the time your wasting your time as the caller is just trying to politely get rid of you.

      However there are certain objections which you can get around for example,"I don't have the money." If that statement is true then I proceed to say, "We are actually quite competitive...starting at only £100 ($150) a month.

      So don't get hang up over the rejection just move on. Would you try and pester a girl who obviously didn't fancy you or your dance moves in a nightclub?

      No you would give up and sulk (unless you are a warrior....you ask the next attractive babe out and carry on until you get laid...hehe).

      Those of us who cold call are more or less over the fear of taking action by cold calling but some of us haven't yet embraced the rejection and moved on. There is after all plenty more buyers in the sea.

      Lastly I am not discounted the rebuttal as it does work sometimes but for all the times it doesn't you have screwed yourself up inside cos the moron on the end of the line didn't budge. I'd rather go with the numbers and keep moving through the call list quickly until I get my "yes"

      Anyway that's my 1.33p (2 cents) lol
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  • Profile picture of the author Rearden
    It's 90% timing? Buying is an emotional decision? Who can sell something unneeded without a base level of fear or greed? How many of those clients you fight for with rebuttal after rebuttal, end up being easy-to-manage clients?
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