Face to Face? I need some advice please.

40 replies
With the weather beginning to get as close to pleasant as it ever gets in the New York area, I've decided to put down the phone and take the show on the road for a couple of days a week.

I've done face to face sales some years back, but have come to prefer the phone for many reasons. Most of which I've expressed many times so I'm not going to repeat myself. I've done nothing but phone sales for so long that I've almost forgotten what would be different about face to face. I've spent the last couple of days wondering what adjustments I would have to make?

Giving it some thought, I couldn't think of anything signifigantly different. What I say on the phone gets the job done, therefore, why would I say anything different in someone's office. A script is not just for the phone, it's for a sales presentation where ever it may be done.

Before anyone jumps in and starts going on about how much they don't like scripts, clearly you don't understand scripts. A well crafted script is a conversation. However, when it's performed, yes I said performed, properly, it's the salesperson who is controlling the conversation. So, no more talk about using or not using scripts please.

As I've been thinking about this, I remembered exactly why I prefer to use to phone. Simply stated, it suits me. I'm not much for small talk. In fact, I've been labeled by many as being shy. Who knew? My personality is such that when it comes to business, I like to get right to the point. It's a critical factor in using the phone successfully.

I don't like spending valuable time talking about bowling trophies, the bumper sticker that belongs on his bumper but is stuck on his wall that says his kid is an honor student at some snotty middle school. Nor would I mention that every kid in that school gets the same ridiculous bumper sticker. Everyone wins in the 21st century middle schools I guess.

When I'm on the phone, it's clear to them that I value their time and mine. I need to get that done in person now. I don't want to offend someone by ignoring the pictures of their family, and I don't want to compliment a boat or talk about the last time they caught a fish.

So where better to come for some advice about face to face than this forum. What have I forgotten, and what do I need to learn.

I do want to say this before I close this request for assistance. If I come to find out that a big part of face to face is a matter of pretending I give a crap about his "blowhard of the year award" or anything like that, I'm back on the phone!
#advice #face
  • Profile picture of the author Michael Bucker
    David, I agree that there should not be much difference in face to face verses phone. As you know I train sales people mostly face to face training. As I read your post I could not help but to smile. When I am training and we eventually get to the subject of phone sales one of the main things I emphisize the most is for them to treat a phone slae the same as they do their face to face.

    The sales process is the same regardless really and most face to face salesmen fail at phone because they change the sale up. The biggest diffference is body language. However I'd say unless you already are good with body language and adjusting with it. I'd pretty much ignor it. The reason I say that is you have developed a pretty good method that may partcially be strong because you don't have body language throwing you off. You don't see a person making a strange face so you keep going not knowing and may close some of your deals for that very reason.

    So the only partical advice I'd have is possibly ignor body language. May sound like odd advice coming from me if you attended some of my classes but in this case it may be some of the best advice to give.

    Forgive any typos I'm on my phone.
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    • Profile picture of the author David Miller
      Thanks Michael, fully understand what you're saying about body language. I don't have anything to say about it right now, but I'll have some feedback to share by the end of the week I'm sure.

      I can't help but think it's like riding a bike in some respects.

      If I run into a wall, I'll pull out my phone and call from the other side of the desk and see if I can close him that way.

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  • Profile picture of the author Michael Bucker
    I don't think your going to have a problem. One possible helpful nugget my be use your very outlook and use it proactivley to create rapport. Since your a to the point kinda guy to save yourself time and the prospect time, use that upfront. It will set you apart for most face to face guys who are all about the gulf game in attemtps to build rapport.

    One thing we all know is important to all americans is time. Time is very valuable. We go to a fast food place, pull into the dive thru and look down at the time if you don't have out food in 30 second. If it takes 45 seconds we wonder what taking them so long. Lol as if we could produde our own meal in less than a minute.

    Just my point, time is valuable so you have a niche a lot of face to face people bypass. I'd go in and upfront say somthing to the affect that you want to be sesnstive with their time as well as yours so unlike most you are straight to the point. It actually may buy you the time several others don't get face to face.

    Cognitive dissasocitaion, setting yourself apart.
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    • Profile picture of the author David Miller
      Good point!

      Long ago I did in-home sales. I had the same no small talk issues back then. I was very successful, in fact I had the highest closing percentage in the company. I broke the number one in-home rule, I NEVER went to the kitchen.

      I knew that every sales person that ever went into a home went to the kitchen so they could live the myth that families talk over the kitchen table. Maybe some do, but I think that mostly happened on Father Knows Best and The Donna Reed Show.

      Everytime I walked into a home, I was asked if I would like to go to the kitchen, and I always declined. I would say whatever room was closest was just fine. By saying I didn't want to go to the kitchen, I didn't even realize I took control from them and they had no idea, but it turned out to be powerful.

      The other big in-home sales rule was to be 5-10 minutes early. Supposedly this was supposed to catch a family before they had the chance to leave the house or turn off the light to pretend they weren't home. I used to arrive 5-10 late, without exception.

      The reason was because I thought if they wanted to leave or pretend they weren't home, I wasn't going to waste my time giving a presentation. I didn't want to spend 30 minutes while they would be busy thinking of objections instead of listening.

      In addition, being late allowed me to use my warm up, which was:

      "I apologize for being a few minutes late, so I hope you'll forgive me for not complimenting your house, kids, car or carpet. I'm sure they're all very nice, but I'm just as sure you'd like to get down to business and then on with your evening, correct?"

      This was followed by a sigh of relief from the husband and wife, and my first "yes" of the presentation.

      I don't think I ever used this in B 2 B, and I wonder how I could translate it?

      Any thoughts?
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  • Profile picture of the author Hugh
    David,

    When you talk about being a few minutes late, I had to smile.
    When I first got into in-home sales, I was taught to always be
    5 minutes late because the lady of the house always wanted
    to tidy up a bit before the guest (us salesmen) arrived.

    Hugh
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  • Profile picture of the author kenmichaels
    I have never made a good face to face sales person.

    When it comes to face to face, i am marginally above adequate.

    I am not sure why you want to go over to the dark side ...

    but i wish you luck brotha.
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    • Profile picture of the author David Miller
      Originally Posted by kenmichaels View Post

      I have never made a good face to face sales person.

      When it comes to face to face, i am marginally above adequate.

      I am not sure why you want to go over to the dark side ...

      but i wish you luck brotha.
      A lot of people seem to believe we ARE on the dark side now. I just want a change of pace for a day or two a week.
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      • Profile picture of the author kenmichaels
        Originally Posted by David Miller View Post

        I just want a change of pace for a day or two a week.
        be careful now, that fresh air can getcha ...

        I hope that's not the beginning stages of "burn out"

        How many years have you been hammering the phone?
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        • Profile picture of the author David Miller
          @kenmichaels - No it's not the beginning of burnout. It's a combination of things. As I said, a change of pace may be a welcomed change for a day or two here and there. I also want to look into the possibility of hiring a few outside reps.

          It's just my nature to never ask someone to do what I haven't done.
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  • Profile picture of the author Jay Rhome
    I'm hiring reps, and I let them decide if they want to close over the phone, face to face, or both. I hired this stunning blond blue-eyed 18 yo girl that says she likes it better face-to-face, and well, she has a few things going for her that I just have to agree :p

    To train her, I went and met some businesses, and wow, I do make small talk and waste time. Mostly because it's in my own area and I use that for rapport, and I am often interested. I wouldn't waste as much time if I was far away. In NY, my guess is everything is near :confused: but then New Yorkers are known for their speedy ways, so you're "not waste our time" approach fits perfectly.

    IMO there's no pressure for you as you can simply revert to the phone anytime you want. The way I see it, the closing ratio is a lot higher in person than on the phone, but you see a lot less prospects. So if you have good closing numbers by phone, maybe the only thing you'll accomplish is a nice change of pace, or new desire for more phone sales. Either way you win
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  • Profile picture of the author RentItNow
    David, you are so much the opposite of me! I can think of every reason in the world to go out and sell than pick up a phone, but that's me.

    What I do is I do not dress up too much, button-down shirt and nice black jeans or I'm liking those new dress pants that sort of look like jeans the way they fit.

    OK, #2 DO NOT carry a bunch of papers or samples and especially not a clipboard.

    #3, It is rare I have to deal with small talk. I just show interest in their business and ask them what is working for them. BUT the thing I run into all the time is someone positioning themselves above you...hard to explain. If someone tells me to wait for the owner or whatever and have a seat, I think the big difference between this and the phone is you have to sit and bare it. Sometimes I say ok, i'll be back at 2pm after a few other appointments...blah blah just to make it seem like I am on the same level as they are, not some salesman (which technically I am but hey!)

    What I most like about face to face is I can see someone's position or posture or somehow sense if they are interested or blowing me off pretty fast. I cant explain what it is I do. I either connect with someone or not and know pretty well right away if I should spend more time in the pursuit or not. Another is they can be looking away a lot but are still engaged in the conversation...I dont think you can see that on the phone.

    Hmmm...what else? Will write more later if I think of as this is where I shine. Btw, it is shining and I love going out in the good weather like it sounds like u want.
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    • Profile picture of the author David Miller
      Great info John! I have a feeling that after doing some face to face I'm going to find some clues to things that may end up enhancing what I do on the phone.

      I've been through that "waiting game power play" many times over the years. Because of my weakness in the area of small talk I've tried to use it to my advantage by saying something like:

      "Clearly you're busy, so I know you want me to get right to business and dispense with the small talk. Am I right?"

      Always a yes response as I recall. Has to be something good when you start any meeting with the prospect saying "yes", I hope so anyway.
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      -- FRANK SINATRA, quoted in The Way You Wear Your Hat
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      • Profile picture of the author RentItNow
        Originally Posted by David Miller View Post

        Great info John! I have a feeling that after doing some face to face I'm going to find some clues to things that may end up enhancing what I do on the phone.

        I've been through that "waiting game power play" many times over the years. Because of my weakness in the area of small talk I've tried to use it to my advantage by saying something like:

        "Clearly you're busy, so I know you want me to get right to business and dispense with the small talk. Am I right?"

        Always a yes response as I recall. Has to be something good when you start any meeting with the prospect saying "yes", I hope so anyway.
        David, once you get into it you can close about 2 out of 10 business owners. It USUALLY involves a second meeting but just think how long it takes to visit 10 stores compared to closing 1 in 100 calls. I just feel way more connected to what's going on when I talk with local business owners in person.

        I learned long ago dealing with landlords and tenants all day that (mostly the landlords) wanted to know what the other guys (their competitors) were doing and was it working. It was as though I was positioning myself to be the transfer person of knowledge of the state of the rentals in my city. Which was perfect because I had entire real estate trusts listening to my pitch just as intently as a one house landlord.

        My point is, sometimes the talk can add a whole lot of value and increase your closing ratio as you said later on the phone.
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        • Profile picture of the author dunkinbbb
          Way back when - I did a lot of B2B high ticket face to face sales - and I hate small talk.

          But, what looks like - to the uninitiated - small talk - to a good salesperson - is relationship building - or bonding.

          As is said many times by online "gurus" = people buy from those they know, like and trust. The foundation of that is a relationship.

          Now there are several ways to establish that relationship - but I think, no matter how good your offer is, business people will be reluctant until that relationship is in place.

          It can happen in a few moments - discovering you both vacationed in the Bahamas - or hate the Red Sox - or whatever - IMHO - it needs to be in place before proceeding to the next step - how you might work together.

          So its not purposefulness small talk - it discovering how you are already related.

          Someone smart once said - you can only build a building as big as the foundation is deep - same thing applies to relationships.

          If you're selling $20 widgets - not much - if any relationship needed.

          If your selling $499 per month SEO services - no matter how good your pitch - I think it considerably more difficult if the relationship is not in place.

          Relationships are not hard to establish - considering the fact that we are all already related - it's just a matter of uncovering how.

          Just my two cents.

          dunkinbbb
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  • Profile picture of the author HypeText
    David,

    Good News! There is no need to have to "pretend" to be a business Owners "Buddy, Pal, Friend O'Mine".

    In Person communication really isnt that different than what you are doing on the phone.

    You mentioned doing "In Home Sales", in the past and I've "been there-done that" too....thankfully B2B is much different than B2C.

    The biggest Factors that will be different in Person are

    1) Eye Contact
    2) Body Language
    3) Amicability (Smile...no different than "Smile & Dial)
    4) Attire...Dress for Success...Jammies aint gonna cut it.

    Obviously the above is all pretty much common sense, but you would be surprised how many overlook one or more items on that list.

    Business Owners know you are there to "Talk Business" and appreciate a strictly business approach.

    Just like on the phone there will always be times that you might find you have some common interests but there is no need to have to pretend.
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    • Profile picture of the author David Miller
      Originally Posted by HypeText View Post

      David,

      Good News! There is no need to have to "pretend" to be a business Owners "Buddy, Pal, Friend O'Mine".

      In Person communication really isnt that different than what you are doing on the phone.

      You mentioned doing "In Home Sales", in the past and I've "been there-done that" too....thankfully B2B is much different than B2C.

      The biggest Factors that will be different in Person are

      1) Eye Contact
      2) Body Language
      3) Amicability (Smile...no different than "Smile & Dial)
      4) Attire...Dress for Success...Jammies aint gonna cut it.

      Obviously the above is all pretty much common sense, but you would be surprised how many overlook one or more items on that list.

      Business Owners know you are there to "Talk Business" and appreciate a strictly business approach.

      Just like on the phone there will always be times that you might find you have some common interests but there is no need to have to pretend.

      Thanks for this....I have done face to face b 2 b....just been a while. I was hoping that enough time has based in society that I would be able to wear my pajamas by now...but I guess not!
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      • Profile picture of the author kenmichaels
        Originally Posted by David Miller View Post

        I would be able to wear my pajamas by now...but I guess not!
        maybe not PJ's , but i hear a guitar, titey whities and a cowboy hat
        gets you pretty far these days. ( well in your neck of the woods any way )
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      • Profile picture of the author HypeText
        Originally Posted by David Miller View Post

        Thanks for this....I have done face to face b 2 b....just been a while. I was hoping that enough time has based in society that I would be able to wear my pajamas by now...but I guess not!
        Well, I hear a great set of legs and a miniskirt can make for a great door opener...you could always try that!
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        • Profile picture of the author David Miller
          No way! The last time I shaved my legs.....oh..nevermind...wrong forum!

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  • Profile picture of the author Kunle Olomofe
    Hi David,

    Here's a simple "script" I've used well...

    1. Walk in smiling warmly--most people stuck in doors are pissed off just for being at work.

    2. Say hello, good morning, good afternoon, whatever it is that flies best in your part of the world (where I live a proper good "morning, afternoon" is the best opener) in a loud enough voice so that you're sure they hear you. Basically speak CLEARLY and CONFIDENTLY.

    3. Hold your head up if that means anything. Again basically I mean be confident. 100% confidence puts people who want to be mean initially or blow you off on the wrong foot for long enough so that you can slide in and get what you want before they remember they don't like you--yeah even though they never met you before

    4. Now here's my best technique... I politely and clearly say... "I'm Kunle Olomofe, an E-business Consultant in the area and I'm looking to introduce myself to businesses I feel might be eager to get online effectively but have no way of doing so correctly and affordably. Could I by any chance get to speak with the person in charge?"

    5. It doesn't ever matter what they say... short off get the hell out, which no one has ever said... I go on with the rest of it as a conversation... yes, I wing it to connect with whoever it is I'm talking to. If they respond favorably, I simply ask them if I can get less than 10 minutes to discuss their web presence or lack thereof. If nothing else they can get to pick my brains totally free.... and I smile.

    6. That usually gets me a few minutes in front of them. Then I tailor the rest of the conversation to what they need, and what I have. It's basically that simple.

    I have a good close rate. Just like rentitnow said about 20% which works great for me. Sometimes I can close 50% on one of those days when the sun is shining just right in my favor Now I don't by ANY means LOVE door-to-door selling, but I can live with it if I have to, and sometimes it's just nice to get out and shake hands.

    Oh by the way, sorry David, I do small talk sometimes if I like the fellow or lady. Nice to get to know the customer too. For me it helps with closing them--when I can think like them I know what to say and what to zip shut about... doesn't work like a science but sure helps especially in cases where the person is open and friendly.

    Hope that helps some.

    Kunle
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    • Profile picture of the author David Miller
      Pardon my confusion:

      Whenever there's a thread about using the phone for cold calling there are typically dozens of responses. Most of them negative. Although, since the discussions about phone sales have broadened in the past few months it seems that many people have made the change to phones, and that's great!

      I haven't seen many threads about face to face, and that's why I thought I would throw this out and get some thoughts about it. I find it odd that just a few people have something to say about, and at least one of them as far as I know for certain, uses the phone exclusively.

      This leads me to the following conclusions:
      1. This thread just isn't interesting enough to warrant many responses.
      2. There's no one doing face to face here because they're out on the road and too tired to comment.
      3. Face to face is pretty much the same as phone, except with pants.
      Just to be clear, I'm not whining that no one is saying much, just wondering.
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      • Profile picture of the author DianaHeuser
        Originally Posted by David Miller View Post

        This leads me to the following conclusions:
        1. This thread just isn't interesting enough to warrant many responses.
        2. There's no one doing face to face here because they're out on the road and too tired to comment.
        3. Face to face is pretty much the same as phone, except with pants.
        ^That^ David .

        Seriously I spend most of my day dealing face-to-face with my customers. It has developed into a more customised business than an off-the-shelf business. I am not sure how that happened but it does mean bigger deals for me. So I have less clients but a higher turnover.

        Everytime I talk to someone new face-to-face, my conversion rate has been 80%. It's time consuming and I am wondering if I need to change to a more generic "Here's a website for $xx and this is what you get" model.

        Anyway, nattering away here Back to work!

        Di
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        • Profile picture of the author David Miller
          @Di - Thanks for that. Actually I have no plans to give up the phone but I know that I'm leaving some money on the table by not meeting at least some of them face to face.
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      • Profile picture of the author RentItNow
        Originally Posted by David Miller View Post

        Pardon my confusion:

        Whenever there's a thread about using the phone for cold calling there are typically dozens of responses. Most of them negative. Although, since the discussions about phone sales have broadened in the past few months it seems that many people have made the change to phones, and that's great!

        I haven't seen many threads about face to face, and that's why I thought I would throw this out and get some thoughts about it. I find it odd that just a few people have something to say about, and at least one of them as far as I know for certain, uses the phone exclusively.

        This leads me to the following conclusions:
        1. This thread just isn't interesting enough to warrant many responses.
        2. There's no one doing face to face here because they're out on the road and too tired to comment.
        3. Face to face is pretty much the same as phone, except with pants.
        Just to be clear, I'm not whining that no one is saying much, just wondering.

        David, I've been going out literally 4 hours a day and can get one to two mockup requests and sell both or the very least one. I can probably do it in less time than that once I get comfortable.

        I have really been paying attention to what you said about the small talk thing and tried a trick today. I just handed the people a letter of introduction (folded in half and paper clipped) and said, do you mind giving this to the owner. It is just a letter introducing myself, I do marketing such as website.....and turn around and go to walk out. Then I pulled the old columbo move, "Oh by the way..." then I would just say some casual comment like "Are the rents very high here?" or "How is your business doing in this area?", whatever...yup small talk. Then I lead it into "Oh the reason I ask is I am doing marketing and noticed a trend in this area...." whatever....it just leads to a conversation and always that darn $500 website lead. Don't know why I can't sell what I want to sell except that a good site is in high-demand....REALLY high demand.

        I was dealing mostly with places I frequented for months but ran out of leads so hit the streets again and have not looked back. So easy to get solid leads in just a couple hours....but as you said...maybe it is just me or my personality...still cant figure out why it does not transfer to the phone.
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  • Profile picture of the author ryanmckinney
    Actually have my first face to face coming up - but I am cheating. We both have something of value we each want, it will not be a pure "sales" meeting.

    I am sure I would do well in face to face meetings, I just don't have the time to attack my local market.

    I have studied NLP, and have been told (prior to studying or even knowing what the heck it was) I was a natural at it.. which "prompted" myself to look into it.

    So I suppose, read up on NLP, that would help with face to face..

    I still reached out and contacted this person first via a direct mail letter. The mailer was vague - just said I have an idea, call if interested. She called, was turned off at first since I told her what I did for a living, but when I came full circle (bartering services), she was interested in talking with me.

    So I'll be bartering for something. I can help her, she can help me, we all "win" to a degree.

    So I suppose I could report back here on how it went.

    For those of you who must know, it was a lawyer, needs help with online presence, I need a divorce. She did agree to drop her $150 consultation fee to meet, so I guess I am already "winning".

    Beauty is in the eye of the beholder.

    Ryan
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    • Profile picture of the author David Miller
      @Ryan - Hate to say this bud but lawyers almost never have consultation fees....unless it's very different in your market. But I'm hard pressed to believe that an attorney without web presence would have a fee. Unless she's some kind of superstar.

      I think you should exchange your consult fee for her consult fee.

      Turn about it fair play.
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      • Profile picture of the author ryanmckinney
        Originally Posted by David Miller View Post

        @Ryan - Hate to say this bud but lawyers almost never have consultation fees....unless it's very different in your market. But I'm hard pressed to believe that an attorney without web presence would have a fee. Unless she's some kind of superstar.

        Actually, prior to mailing to any one, I contacted 3-4 lawyers in the area, since I have a genuine problem: I a married to the devil.

        Anyways, where I am, I haven't found one cheaper than $100. Crazy, I figured they would all be FREE, since I live in a smaller city with a bad economy.

        Their online presence isn't "terrible" - bottom of page 1 some days, top of page 2 others, so they are not getting much. They also do not have a GP listing claimed.. and I see they had YP make them a video, which I could easily rank.

        I am making this meeting in a much larger city 30 minutes away.

        BUT if you must, and feel liking helping a guy out, find a divorce lawyer in Sumter, SC with no consultation fee! I have called as many as 5 a couple of months ago (give or take).

        I know that I could up her inbound calls, and I am fairly confident she can get me divorced lol.

        Ryan
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  • Profile picture of the author jonnnyd23
    One thing I learned about face-face is that it's harder for the prospect to just turn away or kick you out. It's easier for them to hang up the phone and move on. I would recommend reading a little bit about psychology when it comes to body language. There is a lot you can tell from people just by paying attention with out them having to say a word. Eye movement patterns, placement of hands and certain small actions can say a lot.


    Use some visuals

    Say your selling postcards for a nickle a piece, take out an actual nickle and place it on the table and ask them "What can you get for a nickle now a days?" Of course they will say pretty much nothing. Then take out a nicely designed post card sample and tell them this is what you can get for a nickle. This nickle can turn in to $100 and lay out a $100 bill. People "get" things in different ways. Some people understand more when reading, some when watching a video, some with examples and visuals, and some just listening. It's best to have all types of learning styles in your arsenal when pitching. Switch things up a bit and try to make it interesting for the prospect.
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  • Profile picture of the author beeswarn
    David, I've not seen face to face B2B prospecting work for mobile in any appreciable way. I understand that you offer mobile, so I'm eager to see your results while wishing you good luck. Please keep us posted.
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    • Profile picture of the author David Miller
      Originally Posted by beeswarn View Post

      David, I've not seen face to face B2B prospecting work for mobile in any appreciable way. I understand that you offer mobile, so I'm eager to see your results while wishing you good luck. Please keep us posted.
      Hi Beeswarm is it my imagination or have I not seen you around lately? Come back to get smacked around I guess.

      Actually I've never sold mobile, I gave it some thought but decided against it. The few clients that I have where mobile would make sense, I just outsource.

      Today I was out prowling the streets of the exclusive north shore of long island. When I used to sell yellow page ads I used to make appointments and during that process of setting up an appointment I made a mini presentation. When I went back it was pretty much a done deal when I walked in the door.

      I did that today and made 3 appointments. Now here's the odd thing. I KNOW that I could have closed these same 3 on the phone in one shot. However, the experiment is to see if I'm leaving any money on the table by not doing at least some of my sales face to face.
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      The big lesson in life, baby, is never be scared of anyone or anything.
      -- FRANK SINATRA, quoted in The Way You Wear Your Hat
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      • Profile picture of the author RentItNow
        Originally Posted by David Miller View Post

        I did that today and made 3 appointments. Now here's the odd thing. I KNOW that I could have closed these same 3 on the phone in one shot. However, the experiment is to see if I'm leaving any money on the table by not doing at least some of my sales face to face.
        Cant wait to see the results! I have been thinking about this A LOT going forward. Still need to train my army of sales people but dont know if it will be in phone or door-to-door. There is just sooo many businesses to cover that have never even hear of a place that does marketing for them. I still feel we are not even scratching the surface of what is possible. I just drive down the streets and think to myself, there is another and another and another and another place I can sell something to. But when i look at a phone book it is almost like I don't understand the business unless I visually see it. Guess that's what google streetview is for!

        Btw, David, what is it you are selling? The mobile is not viable here yet either yet I have one client that has THOUSANDS of visitors a day and 1/3 his visitors are mobile/ipad. Businesses can only ignore this so long.
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        I have no agenda but to help those in the same situation. This I feel will pay the bills.
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  • Profile picture of the author macker2298
    well right off the bat i can tell you that in a face to face appearence is very important, no matter how good your product is if you can't sell yourself (both visually and intellectually) it'll be harder to sell your product. I find that face to face works better for me, i can close a deal faster and usually the amounts are higher.
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  • Profile picture of the author beeswarn
    Yes, I've been deep in a big project and I've had no free time for few days.

    Sorry, concluded you were doing mobile from something else I read. No matter. Staying tuned anyway because Lawn Guyland must be the most over-prospected area in the country and I wanna see how someone with no fear will do.
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    • Profile picture of the author David Miller
      New Yorkers and Lawn Guylanders in particular are nothing but paper tigers.

      Toughest place I've ever sold was in South Florida. Pretty sure that's because it's full of New Yorkers and Lawn Guylanders with a bad attitude.
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      The big lesson in life, baby, is never be scared of anyone or anything.
      -- FRANK SINATRA, quoted in The Way You Wear Your Hat
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  • Profile picture of the author beeswarn
    Hey David, how's it going?

    Make any new friends or dates for coffee? Build any warm, true, trusting, personal relationships with complete strangers so that you're right there for them if they ever need anything?

    I feel so slimy after writing that I've got to go take a shower. Lemme know how you're doing in the field.
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    • Profile picture of the author kat57
      Having been in outside sales for many years I find that sometimes just going back to the basics helps.
      Speak to them as if they are your friends and family.
      Look around the office at their interests and break the ice that way.
      If you are so busy planning your next sentence you aren't really listening to your client.
      Be in the moment and remember, they put their pants on one leg at a time like everybody else.
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      • Profile picture of the author David Miller
        Originally Posted by kat57 View Post

        Having been in outside sales for many years I find that sometimes just going back to the basics helps.
        Speak to them as if they are your friends and family.
        Look around the office at their interests and break the ice that way.
        If you are so busy planning your next sentence you aren't really listening to your client.
        Be in the moment and remember, they put their pants on one leg at a time like everybody else.
        Speak to them as if they are your friends and family.

        This is subjective, depends how you speak with them! It also depends on who you are marketing to. There are a lot of people who are comfortable with informal approaches and there are just as many that appreciate the formality that is the nature of their profession. You have to adjust.

        Look around the office at their interests and break the ice that way.

        This has always been what I've hated about face to face and loved about the phone. It's also typical of the many old "chestnuts" of sales training that condradicts itself in the same breath.

        What I'm saying here is that there is wisdom in the advice to "be yourself." If that advice is followed by doing something like you suggest above, it's at cross purposes if you are not comfortable doing it. I'm not comfortable feigning interest in things that don't interest me.

        If you are so busy planning your next sentence you aren't really listening to your client.

        I couldn't agree more! Phone or in person, if you don't have a script to follow that's what's going to happen.

        Be in the moment and remember, they put their pants on one leg at a time like everybody else.

        Again, I agree with you. However, lately I've been wearing a cape and superhero tights.

        Thanks again for the input.

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        The big lesson in life, baby, is never be scared of anyone or anything.
        -- FRANK SINATRA, quoted in The Way You Wear Your Hat
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        • Profile picture of the author John Durham
          Okay, I was going to take a sabbatical from the Warrior forum today but...

          David,

          As strong a trainer as you are, you shouldn't be doing personal sales at all. You should be duplicating your processes and multiplying your efforts.

          My two cents.

          Edit: Read Og Mandino's Greatest Salesman In The World and "Get" The End.

          The end of the rainbow in a great salesman's journey is that he duplicates himself and his systems.
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          • Profile picture of the author David Miller
            Originally Posted by John Durham View Post

            Okay, I was going to take a sabbatical from the Warrior forum today but...

            David,

            As strong a trainer as you are, you shouldn't be doing personal sales at all. You should be duplicating your processes and multiplying your efforts.

            My two cents.

            Edit: Read Og Mandino's Greatest Salesman In The World and "Get" The End.

            The end of the rainbow in a great salesman's journey is that he duplicates himself and his systems.
            Thanks so much for the kind words John!

            I'm a strong believer in not asking or suggesting that someone do anything that I haven't done myself. Particularly in a case where I'm about to begin a project that I'm bringing a few sales people on board for.

            Way back when I first decided that I might like the role of sales, like a lot of others, I found myself taking direction from managers who had never actually been in front of a prospect. This can only mean that failure cannot be very far away.

            First the sales person fails because he's following advice that is mere guess work, the sales manager fails because the sales people aren't selling, and then the business will fail.

            Now I've got two very talented sales people who will be working with me. They have their own personalities and style and I would never change that natural quality, nor would I want to. But they know what I've done. They know when I share with them what has been effective and what has not, it isn't mere theory.

            It doesn't promise that they will follow my advice to the letter. But it does allow me to be better able to pin point any areas of problems they may have.
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            The big lesson in life, baby, is never be scared of anyone or anything.
            -- FRANK SINATRA, quoted in The Way You Wear Your Hat
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    • Profile picture of the author David Miller
      Originally Posted by beeswarn View Post

      Hey David, how's it going?

      Make any new friends or dates for coffee? Build any warm, true, trusting, personal relationships with complete strangers so that you're right there for them if they ever need anything?

      I feel so slimy after writing that I've got to go take a shower. Lemme know how you're doing in the field.
      As it turns out, you don't have to share warm fuzzies, hugs, have coffee, or any kum-by-yah moments with business people.

      Who would have thought that common sense and most basic business reasonings would create a sales opportunity. I have said many times in many posts that:

      "the only reasons a business has to make any buying decision is either to make a profit, decrease operating expenses, or both."

      I will say that I have come across a few who have expressed the need to meet for coffee, but it turns out it's because they can't afford to buy their own cup. Since they can't afford a cup of coffee, they can't write a check either. NEXT!
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      The big lesson in life, baby, is never be scared of anyone or anything.
      -- FRANK SINATRA, quoted in The Way You Wear Your Hat
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