Business Owner Has All the Business He Can Handle

75 replies
Restaurant owner told me "I have all the the business I can handle right now." Didn't care about next month. Today was good, so next month and next summer would therefore be good too. He's nowhere on Google and doesn't care.

No wonder the failure rate of restaurants is so high.

I'm new to offline marketing. I am surprised when I run into a business owner who is not a "go-getter." I'll check in in a few months to see how it's going, but am not going to waste my time if he really doesn't want to do anything to bring in business. Maybe I'll be hitting up the next business in that space.

I'd love to hear other stories and how you handle it.
#business #business marketing #handle #offline #owner #sales conversion #sales objections
  • Profile picture of the author iInvent
    Wow... I can kind of understand not wanting or needing a website, but a Google Place listing would certainly be the least they could do... Surprising!

    Are they advertising in newspapers, sending direct mail?
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  • Profile picture of the author Colm Whelan
    Not everyone wants or needs more customers. If they don't you congratulate them and go help their competitor take their existing customers. Simple
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  • Profile picture of the author mosthost
    Restaurants don't need Google. Let's be realistic here. Sure, it may help business, but it's not essential.
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    • Profile picture of the author TheCG
      Originally Posted by mosthost View Post

      Restaurants don't need Google. Let's be realistic here. Sure, it may help business, but it's not essential.
      Don't agree with this at all.

      When you travel, out of towners are looking for a certain type of restaurant, type it in on the phone and bam....Google Places pops up the top ones. Take a look at the reviews and choose one.

      When I am out of town, this is how I roll and I am sure alot of others do, too.
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      • Profile picture of the author mosthost
        Originally Posted by TheCG View Post

        Don't agree with this at all.

        When you travel, out of towners are looking for a certain type of restaurant, type it in on the phone and bam....Google Places pops up the top ones. Take a look at the reviews and choose one.

        When I am out of town, this is how I roll and I am sure alot of others do, too.
        Chances are Yelp or other websites will already contain the info. Or YellowPages.com etc.

        No one's arguing that whether people use search or not. But for many local businesses it's not critical.

        If they perceive building the website as a big expense without much payoff, there's no chance they'll want it.
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      • Profile picture of the author iInvent
        Originally Posted by TheCG View Post

        Don't agree with this at all.

        When you travel, out of towners are looking for a certain type of restaurant, type it in on the phone and bam....Google Places pops up the top ones. Take a look at the reviews and choose one.

        When I am out of town, this is how I roll and I am sure alot of others do, too.
        Exactly my point...
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    • Profile picture of the author Kevin Krebs
      Originally Posted by mosthost View Post

      Restaurants don't need Google. Let's be realistic here. Sure, it may help business, but it's not essential.
      I respectfully disagree. To an extent, I agree that location, location, location is better for restaurants geographically than online, but social proof & personal experience is the lifeblood of any restaurant.

      Local directories are more powerful than a Google #1 ranking I would agree, but with so many social proof opportunities (Google+Local, Yelp, Zagat, etc.) determines the choices of at least 80% of people if I were to guesstimate and if you've got bad reviews, or even ONE horrible review - credibility is thrown out the window regardless of whether it's even true or not.

      If a restaurant can rank #1 in google for website and Google+local, then I believe logically they'll receive most of the web traffic and most people are willing (risk) to spend $10-$20 for a meal if it has good reviews. In fact, a GOOD taste is already in their mouth (no pun intended) of how good of experience they will have, which means most probably 1) more referrals and 2) more repeat business.

      Just my 2 cents friend.
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  • Profile picture of the author DWolfe
    Originally Posted by ypadilla View Post

    Restaurant owner told me "I have all the the business I can handle right now." .
    Take it as sign he did not want to talk to you now or in the future. Just move on, and take it as any thing personal. If the owner was having a hectic (bad) day they do not want to speak to anybody.
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  • Profile picture of the author Entrecon
    "that's great, can I show you how a website can help you turn tables faster and reduce the time your staff has to spend on the phone answering questions and taking take-out orders? If your menu is online, many guests will know what they want when they sit down and won't have to look at a menu for 10 minutes. This will also help for people calling in for take-out. By having a website and a Google listing your hostess will not have to answer a many calls from people checking on your hours or trying to get directions."

    You have to find the business owners problem and then provide the solution. If he is busy and getting angry customers that are having to wait in line, don't tell him you are going to send more people, tell him how you can help with all of the people that are already there.
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    • Profile picture of the author ypadilla
      Originally Posted by Entrecon View Post

      not have to answer a many calls from people checking on your hours or trying to get directions.
      Great thought! Location is a big problem. He's off the main drag, a block down pedestrian-only walkway and make one more turn .... " and not open every day.
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  • Profile picture of the author ypadilla
    People are funny. I won't take it personally. This personal interaction thing is taking some getting used to!

    I was introduced to him by an investor in his biz who told him that he REALLY needs to talk to me. The investor can do the selling. I run into the investor often and he'll ask how it went.

    Mostly, I'm looking elsewhere for business and won't be so surprised by this objection in the future. :-)
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  • Profile picture of the author MonteMichaels
    You cant win them all no matter how much you know it will benefit them. You might have wanted them for a client, but they may be doing you a favor. By their tone, it sounds like they could be a problem if you don't meet their expectations on day one. Just find your next target.


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  • Profile picture of the author bnicoletti82
    did he ask you the price right off the bat? If so, that's the ONLY thing he cares about.
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    • Profile picture of the author ypadilla
      Originally Posted by bnicoletti82 View Post

      did he ask you the price right off the bat? If so, that's the ONLY thing he cares about.
      No, he didn't. I'm wise to that signal.
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  • Profile picture of the author TheCG
    Originally Posted by ypadilla View Post

    Restaurant owner told me "I have all the the business I can handle right now." Didn't care about next month. Today was good, so next month and next summer would therefore be good too. He's nowhere on Google and doesn't care.

    No wonder the failure rate of restaurants is so high.

    I'm new to offline marketing. I am surprised when I run into a business owner who is not a "go-getter." I'll check in in a few months to see how it's going, but am not going to waste my time if he really doesn't want to do anything to bring in business. Maybe I'll be hitting up the next business in that space.

    I'd love to hear other stories and how you handle it.

    I hear all the time "I have all the business I can handle." I guess the recession I keep hearing about was just at my house.

    Anyway, it is just an excuse to blow you off. I will throw a couple of questions at them about it if I am having a slow day but otherwise it is generally a waste of time.

    I have a guy yesterday spend a good 5 minutes trying to tell me whay he "wasn't ready" for a website.

    Me: Is money a problem? We can put you on a payment plan.

    Him: No, I got the money. I just don't have the time to mess with it.

    Me: That is the great thing about letting US do it for you. We take care of everything.

    Him: I am just not ready for a site.

    Me: So you aren't ready for more customers?

    Him: Oh, no, I always want more customers.

    Me: Well, let me bring them to you.

    Him: I am just not ready for a website.

    And on it goes......haha
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    • Profile picture of the author ypadilla
      TheCG: Thanks for the dialog! Ya gotta laugh. I sure beats going crazy!
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      • Profile picture of the author Jerry McGough
        I'll suggest not even talking to a restaurant owner when all the seats have butts on them.

        That a common comeback.....

        Kinda tough to use that line on you if the place is three-quarters empty.

        Also, if your offering services like Google listings and rankings.....tell them you don't work with neighboring competitors, and you'll likely be working with their competition....that you really like their place and would sure like to help with their needs.
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    • Profile picture of the author mojo1
      Originally Posted by TheCG View Post

      I hear all the time "I have all the business I can handle." I guess the recession I keep hearing about was just at my house.

      Anyway, it is just an excuse to blow you off. I will throw a couple of questions at them about it if I am having a slow day but otherwise it is generally a waste of time.

      I have a guy yesterday spend a good 5 minutes trying to tell me whay he "wasn't ready" for a website.

      Me: Is money a problem? We can put you on a payment plan.

      Him: No, I got the money. I just don't have the time to mess with it.

      Me: That is the great thing about letting US do it for you. We take care of everything.

      Him: I am just not ready for a site.

      Me: So you aren't ready for more customers?

      Him: Oh, no, I always want more customers.

      Me: Well, let me bring them to you.

      Him: I am just not ready for a website.

      And on it goes......haha
      Sounds like this guy might think HE has to be featured on the site and probably doesn't feel comfortable with his looks. I mean this in the most sincerest way as I personally feel this way with post pregnant weight still with me which is the primary reason I don't have a linkedin profile nor gasp....a Facebook page and I know how beneficial this would be for my business

      If this was his case or somthing similar, this type of sensitive reason would never be revealed no matter if you gave him a website for free. Just something to ponder.
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      • Profile picture of the author umc
        I have a service business, and I don't need or want more customers. Take it however you want, but I'm working 7 days a week now, and more marketing would only leave me susceptible to sullying my reputation because people might be upset when I turned them away.

        I have a friend with a handyman business. They are in the same place I am, working 7 days a week, and they don't need your help either. They don't have a GP page. I do, but don't need it.

        This is the offline marketing forum. Someone truly good offline doesn't necessarily need your help online, just sayin'.

        By the way, that doesn't mean that I and my friend are not "go-getters". We hustle seven days a week and work harder than most people.
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        • Profile picture of the author mojo1
          Originally Posted by umc View Post

          I have a service business, and I don't need or want more customers. Take it however you want, but I'm working 7 days a week now, and more marketing would only leave me susceptible to sullying my reputation because people might be upset when I turned them away.

          I have a friend with a handyman business. They are in the same place I am, working 7 days a week, and they don't need your help either. They don't have a GP page. I do, but don't need it.

          This is the offline marketing forum. Someone truly good offline doesn't necessarily need your help online, just sayin'.

          By the way, that doesn't mean that I and my friend are not "go-getters". We hustle seven days a week and work harder than most people.
          Succession planning would sound like the next step for folks like yourself perhaps.

          In your honest opinion, would someone like yourself or your successful business colleagues entertain the notion of selling their already super, successful businesses?

          Would a phone call venturing into this path be something you would be open to discussing with a consultant who could not successfully sell you their income generating internet based services?
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          • Profile picture of the author umc
            Originally Posted by mojo1 View Post

            Succession planning would sound like the next step for folks like yourself perhaps.

            In your honest opinion, would someone like yourself or your successful business colleagues entertain the notion of selling their already super, successful businesses?

            Would a phone call venturing into this path be something you would be open to discussing with a consultant who could not successfully sell you their income generating internet based services?
            I love what I do and wouldn't sell it. I also won't hire, as I don't want those headaches. My friend hires crews and subs them out. He too loves what he does, and probably wouldn't sell. You can't always sell a product or service to someone.

            Myself, I do have interest in marketing for others because I've done it for myself, and was once a successful telemarketer, so marketing is just in my blood. We do plan on slowing our business down a little at a point, and I will then play in the marketing field a bit on the side. I've also got an idea for a podcast, blog, etc.
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        • Profile picture of the author globalpro
          Originally Posted by umc View Post

          I have a service business, and I don't need or want more customers. Take it however you want, but I'm working 7 days a week now, and more marketing would only leave me susceptible to sullying my reputation because people might be upset when I turned them away.

          I have a friend with a handyman business. They are in the same place I am, working 7 days a week, and they don't need your help either. They don't have a GP page. I do, but don't need it.

          This is the offline marketing forum. Someone truly good offline doesn't necessarily need your help online, just sayin'.

          By the way, that doesn't mean that I and my friend are not "go-getters". We hustle seven days a week and work harder than most people.
          OK, maybe I am missing something.

          While it's great that you and your friend have more work than you can handle, and don't want new customers, how does what you are saying help the OP? I guess what I am wondering is why you would try to negate what the OP was asking?

          Through the rest of your posts, you mention working 7 days a week with 3 different businesses. Does one not make enough that you have 3 to keep up with?

          Not being critical here, but the offline forum is for people to come and ask questions to help build their business up. So far your posts have been to say why we don't need to worry about businesses that have 'too much business'.

          Bad part is, I know a lot of businesses where I live that said the same thing a few years back that aren't in business any more.

          The difference in the way I approach it is, it's not the amount of business, but the quality of business you have. I call it reputation. Customers can come and go, but a solid reputation will carry any business through all kinds of situations.

          Still kind of lost on your posts.

          Thanks,

          John
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          • Profile picture of the author umc
            Originally Posted by globalpro View Post

            OK, maybe I am missing something.

            While it's great that you and your friend have more work than you can handle, and don't want new customers, how does what you are saying help the OP? I guess what I am wondering is why you would try to negate what the OP was asking?

            Through the rest of your posts, you mention working 7 days a week with 3 different businesses. Does one not make enough that you have 3 to keep up with?

            Not being critical here, but the offline forum is for people to come and ask questions to help build their business up. So far your posts have been to say why we don't need to worry about businesses that have 'too much business'.

            Bad part is, I know a lot of businesses where I live that said the same thing a few years back that aren't in business any more.

            The difference in the way I approach it is, it's not the amount of business, but the quality of business you have. I call it reputation. Customers can come and go, but a solid reputation will carry any business through all kinds of situations.

            Still kind of lost on your posts.

            Thanks,

            John
            I was simply telling the OP that there ARE actually businesses out there that don't want or can't handle more business. That way she doesn't waste time with them, doesn't get into thinking that business owners are simply blowing her off, doesn't sit and stew trying to think of ways to profit off of those people, but rather spends her time on the market she is truly targeting. She obviously was struck by it enough to start a thread here, and people chimed in agreeing with her premise, and I was just showing that sometimes things are just what they are. If a business owner says that he or she cannot handle or doesn't want more business, it might just be the case. I've had countless marketers call me wanting to get me more business, and have had to argue with them because they've wasted their time and mine continuing to try to overcome my objections.

            As to your next point in bold, I like variety in life, so sue me. I enjoy working my business in various ways and cleaning in a variety of capacities. We started with house cleaning, and I decided to throw in other services and start them on the side because it is interesting work too. It also isn't a bad idea to be able to provide multiple services to my clientele, as it is quite efficient to be able to clean their house and in the same trip be able to detail their car and clean their carpet if I want. But the bottom line is that I just like to get involved in lots of things, probably the ADD in me. I could certainly go after any one of them and earn what I need to if I so desire though.

            I too believe in reputation and producing quality work, and as a perfectionist I spend an inordinate amount of time testing products and methods and coming up with my own ways of doing things. Our clients will have nobody else in their homes but us, and there is a reason for that. I agree that it isn't all about volume, but what is awesome is when the volume of work comes simply because of just what you're talking about, quality of work. Do quality work, provide excellent products or services, and marketing efforts of others aren't needed. So, when mister or misses business owner tells you that they don't want or need your help at the time, they might not actually need it, which is all I've been saying, refuting the earlier theories that they were just blowing you off, weren't "go-getters", etc.

            Now, could they be just sick of getting calls? Sure. Could they be busy and not have time to deal with you? Sure. Could they need your services but be narrow minded? Absolutely. But they could also just not need or want your help, an option that didn't seem to be considered valid, so I tried to point out it's validity.
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    • Profile picture of the author Jack44
      WOW,Wish i had that Problem!!,been in the Welding Buiss,for 36+ Years, Co. is 109 Years Old, 3-1/2 years ago,some one thru the OFF SWITCH!,And I only deal with fortune 100 co's,Contractor's come to you,when the Other shops,have them on COD!, We all talk,, Thats why,im taking so course's in IM,, People,DON'T have the Money! Big Co's,are cutting Back,or have a massive site allready,! Sure is a 100% Turn around, Nov. cant come fast enough for Manufacturing!,Thanks, Jack,, Lucky were making Artistic Iron ,,As the Upper Class want hand Made,quality, So,its a diff. World out there,! Dont know any Rest. in Ct. that are saying, I have to Many Customers., Thanks, Ps, Then the small Co's that Pay in 30 days, CAN'T get a bank loan!! My banker, for 25+ years,told me flat out, If you don't need it!,,You will get It!, If your desperate,and dont have a 830 Fico, Forget it. And,hes not the Only ones ive heard it from!????
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  • Profile picture of the author laurencewins
    You have to remember that not EVERY customer will say yes, regardless of how much they probably need your services. Qualify them, ask questions as Entrecon says and if they still don't want to buy from you, NEXT!
    Remember the old sales adage?
    Some will, some won't, so what!
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    • Profile picture of the author simranjeet singh
      You can offer him free service sample. FREE mostly attract people. Once he agree with your service plans you can talk about your charges, m sure he will sure listen to you.
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      • Profile picture of the author Aaron Doud
        Originally Posted by simranjeet singh View Post

        You can offer him free service sample. FREE mostly attract people. Once he agree with your service plans you can talk about your charges, m sure he will sure listen to you.
        I disagree free doesn't attract me especially if it isn't something I want. Free in my mind means no $ but it still takes my time.

        Many free services I would gladly pay for if the time involved would be nearly zero for me.

        Time is more valuable than money especially to a lot of small business owners who are working 7 day work weeks.
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  • Profile picture of the author Fernando Veloso
    Good for him, and good for you. Time to move on and focus on next customer. No point in taking it personal - even when you know they're wasting something really good.

    Thats just the nature of sales, isn't it?
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  • Profile picture of the author Quentin
    We run into quite a few businesses that are doing well in the current environment.

    With these people I ask if I can take them out for coffee or something and find out what they are doing that works.

    I love talking to business people and not having to sell just chewing the fat and you can learn so much.

    Quentin
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  • Profile picture of the author Aaron Doud
    This is a key learning lesson.

    What are you? Are you a marketing consultant? Or are you providing web services? As a marketing consultant you have more to offer.

    Is the resturant always full? Or was he just getting rid of you?

    I think a lot of people on this forum have a bias toward online marketing. But in the real world online marketing might not be the best for the client.

    If a resturant is local and well known online marketing isn't going to help them. Honestly they likely don't even need to advertise. We have a few local resturants like that. They simply have a strong loyal base of repeat customer and their referrals.

    So how do we market to this guys? Do we even bother? My answer is we do market because our job is to help them maintain the clients they have and to maybe grow the slower times. Even the best resturants have periods of empty tables.

    What can we offer to fill those? First our advice. Would 2 to 4pm deals get more people into the seats during this slow period? Yes. Could we use SMS marketing to inform their raving fans of these deals? Yes. Do you think we could turn a once a month customer into a once a week customer with SMS? Yes.

    The key is to talk to the potential client. You need to offer them marketing that makes sense. If a business is almost 100% repeat and referrals and at near capicty it makes no sense to waste money getting new customers when those are the most expensive to get. They are a mature business at the stage of increasing visits and average ticket. How can we help them increase the average ticket and increase the number of visits per month.

    Maybe we can even ask them about expansion plans and how we could help do the grand opening launch.

    In the end what we want to sell isn't always what the customer needs. If you are a marketing consultant you have more you can do.

    I can 100% say if this potential client was being honest that google places would be worthless for them. Even for visitors. Most people visiting an area either know people there who they will ask where to eat or are visiting attractions in the area. So that is referral business and offline marketing at an near the attractions aka billboards and cross promotions.
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  • Profile picture of the author racso316
    Don't take it personal but it might've been due to bad positioning, lack of qualifying or the plain and simple truth: they don't need more customers.

    Like they say above, you can't win them all. No one has a 100% closing rate. Besides, because we are in a recesion doesn't mean there are not businesses applying solid marketing and making money where most are not.

    They might really not need your services because they are making as much money as they need and they can't afford anymore.

    Either way, keep on going, congrats on taking action.
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  • Profile picture of the author Aaron Doud
    umc you and your friend are perfect examples where I would be talking about consulting on how to grow the business since you have hit a peak. You can't handle more business without a growth plan.

    I do management and business consulting on the side but normally work with small companies or home based businesses. If I decided to do consulting full time(which i have been) I would target companies like yours. Working with successful people and taking them to the next level is always exciting.

    To all the offliners the more you offer the better your closing with be. You become a trusted business partner and not just a service provider.
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  • Profile picture of the author Aaron Doud
    umc why not hire or at least get some 1099 people to help with the work load?

    Why create a job when you can create a business and make the income semi-passively?
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    • Profile picture of the author umc
      Originally Posted by Aaron Doud View Post

      umc why not hire or at least get some 1099 people to help with the work load?

      Why create a job when you can create a business and make the income semi-passively?
      Our primary services (residential house cleaning) are very personalized, and most clients would be upset if we hired out their houses. We develop great relationships with our clients and are paid well for what we do, which is fat beyond just cleaning.

      With that said, I have been developing carpet cleaning on the side, and it is more of a one time interaction that also has more margin in it. I do have some interest in developing that and hiring it out, but I also have trepidation as to whether I want that headache or not. Hiring others is not "passive" income. As a member of many professional forums, I've seen the stupid employee tricks that happen, and dealing with stupidity is not my forte. So, I'm not sure if I want to do that.

      I also have a mobile auto detailing service, but it is somewhat seasonal. I had someone on a 1099 basis doing that, but after he came back from armed forces training he became weird and disappeared (with some of my stuff, no less). I haven't hired it out since.

      My passion is serving others, and I might develop my skills into information products, a podcast, etc. for more of a passive income, without employee headaches. I don't know, I'm pretty happy doing what we do, and wont stop that. To know that you made a difference in someone's personal life is a beautiful thing, and we are told often how great we are at what we do. Not sure I'd trade that for anything.
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      • Profile picture of the author Mister Natural
        Originally Posted by umc View Post

        Our primary services (residential house cleaning) are very personalized, and most clients would be upset if we hired out their houses. We develop great relationships with our clients and are paid well for what we do, which is fat beyond just cleaning.

        With that said, I have been developing carpet cleaning on the side, and it is more of a one time interaction that also has more margin in it. I do have some interest in developing that and hiring it out, but I also have trepidation as to whether I want that headache or not. Hiring others is not "passive" income. As a member of many professional forums, I've seen the stupid employee tricks that happen, and dealing with stupidity is not my forte. So, I'm not sure if I want to do that.

        I also have a mobile auto detailing service, but it is somewhat seasonal. I had someone on a 1099 basis doing that, but after he came back from armed forces training he became weird and disappeared (with some of my stuff, no less). I haven't hired it out since.

        My passion is serving others, and I might develop my skills into information products, a podcast, etc. for more of a passive income, without employee headaches. I don't know, I'm pretty happy doing what we do, and wont stop that. To know that you made a difference in someone's personal life is a beautiful thing, and we are told often how great we are at what we do. Not sure I'd trade that for anything.
        You should protect your future and convert today's satisfied customers into
        positive "Testimonials" on your website for future reference and to maintain the income you are now accustomed to.

        So you are a "one man" cleaning company?
        Don't you deserve a vacation?

        What will happen to your business when you trip and break your ankle ?
        The smallest injury can throw your business into a lot of unhappy customers.
        Sounds like you're kind of hard on yourself.

        I would at least bring some one in part time so they are familiar with the jobs
        in case I slip in the shower and land on my head.
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  • Profile picture of the author rhinocl
    People lie when you try to sell them things. It is your duty to yourself and your potential customers to get through the lies to the truth by asking more questions. That way you can collect a check and help your prospects. You must uncover the real objections before you can close them.
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  • Profile picture of the author Aaron Doud
    umc I understand.

    I've spend most of my professional life in management. Managing employees isn't hard. But the key is hiring right. I always had the lowest turnover and highest metrics. Employee satifaction tied with good hiring practices means very little work for the manager. Your employees take pride in their work, themselves, and the company. I can honestly tell you that years back when I managed at blockbuster I literally "worked" a 45 hour work week which was me reading magazines and watching videos for about 3/4th of it. I had the lowest turn over in the district and I had the highest loyality program(rewards, movie pass, and etc) percentage in the region. I was top 100 in that percentage for the whole company. I loved that job but the pay wasn't that great(around $45k a year with 4 weeks of vacation) so I left it.

    You can build the same with your own company. The "4 hour work week" is easier IMO with employees vs. outsourcing. But in the begining it takes time because you have to hire and create the culture where employees are motivated by personal satifaction with a job well done. Where for example using my Blockbuster example they call you at home to tell you how many passes they sold. Why did they call? Not to hear me tell them "good job". No they called because they wanted to share with me the fact they knew they did a good job. They reconized their own greatness and knew I wanted to hear about it. They also knew that when I spoke to my bosses it was never my store and my success but their store and their success.

    Check out the one min manager for some great tips on how to create that kind of workplace culture.
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  • Profile picture of the author Jason Kanigan
    Originally Posted by ypadilla View Post

    Restaurant owner told me "I have all the the business I can handle right now." Didn't care about next month. Today was good, so next month and next summer would therefore be good too. He's nowhere on Google and doesn't care.

    No wonder the failure rate of restaurants is so high.

    I'm new to offline marketing. I am surprised when I run into a business owner who is not a "go-getter." I'll check in in a few months to see how it's going, but am not going to waste my time if he really doesn't want to do anything to bring in business. Maybe I'll be hitting up the next business in that space.

    I'd love to hear other stories and how you handle it.
    Read this post.
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  • Profile picture of the author ahlexis
    Loving what you do is one thing. But if you are a family (wo)man, and your business is run only by you, then you run the risk of putting your family in a precarious position should something happen to you. Most people think in terms of when they pass on, but there are other things that can happen as well, for example an auto accident that is not your fault can put you in the spot of not having the ability to do what you love, sometimes for months on end. I have one friend who had to learn how to walk all over again as a young adult after a really bad accident left his family unsure if he would make it, and then after he survived, unsure if he would ever get out of the wheelchair or not. He eventually did, but it took a long time to get his life close to anything remotely considered pre-accident normal. Having a business where you can choose to be active or passive already structured as passive eases some of the pain of that situation, and also allows you to focus 100% on recuperating to your full potential.

    Also, in the event you do pass on, you have spent all this time building a wonderful business but how does your family sell that business should they desire to when you are no longer be there? If structured as a passive business then they have an asset to sell. If not, then it will be a lot tougher for them to move on when they are ready and the time is right after they have grieved your loss.

    I recently met someone who knew he did not like dealing with employees and had sold a business. He ended up starting a different business, and knowing that he did not like dealing with employees, he started out with the determination not to deal with employees and so hired a manager to deal with the employees. It left him with his sanity (that he said he had lost with trying to manage more than one employee in the first business) and a lot more free time to spend with his family actually getting to watch his kids grow up.

    Believe it or not, there still are trustworthy employees out there who take a serious pride in their work and getting things done to the level that makes your customers very happy. Yes, it may take some work in finding them. But they are out there. And some of them will strive to keep the business just as successful as you would but do not want the risk of actually owning a business.

    Getting back to the main point of the OP, which is a potential client who is saying they have all the business they can handle, is it possible that there is some way to streamline their business so that they are not maxed out? And are they HAPPY with the fact that they have all the business they can handle? For some people having so many customers might not be ideal, and perhaps they might want to slow down a bit (or at least find some free time) but think that their constant busy state is the only way they can manage to have the income they have become accustomed to. Maybe there is something you can show them where they can use technology to take some of the load off without disappointing their current customers so that they have less stress and yet still maintain the high levels of customer satisfaction?
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    • Profile picture of the author umc
      @Ahlexis

      I totally understand the risk of being self-employed vs being a true business owner. I'm self-employed at this point, which leaves me exposed (like most other employees out there in the world) if I were to not be able to work for some reason. I get that. That is why I have been working on starting a carpet cleaning business on the side that I may indeed hire out at some point, and is why I have some interest in doing some various things in marketing. I'm also working on building my 6 months "emergency fund" ala Dave Ramsey.

      I also agree that there are good employees to be had out there. I just think that they are hard to find for house cleaning, as it attracts a certain type of person. Employees often get too friendly with clients and overstep their bounds, and that's the ones that actually show up and don't just show up to steal meds and money. Ours is a very person service that takes place in someone's home, and often it attracts people that want that access and/or just think that anyone can clean and there is therefore a low barrier of entry into the business. I would never subject my clients to the horror stories that I read time and time again on professional cleaning forums from my peers that have tried to hire.

      However, like I said, carpet cleaning has a higher margin and is more of a one time gig, not so much repetition. I'm looking at that once I hit a financial goal that I'm aiming for now.

      Also, I'm contemplating training someone to take over my detailing business and acting as the marketing arm only to earn some money more passively, though it won't be much in all likelihood. Gotta start somewhere, and I don't have time to detail anymore, but I know how to get the business.

      Thanks for the input on my behalf. I'm sorry if I've taken over this thread. A hijack was not intended. Hopefully it at least gives some insight, and maybe it helps some here see the mindset of the service business that they may be talking to.
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  • Profile picture of the author srh41
    I'm just looking to start myself so I don't have any experiences yet. That owner is a fool and he will be begging you for service especialy if you sign the guy nextdoor
    I have watched some informative videos on this and sounds like they are right. Alot of business owners do NOT want to see any money going out the door even though they can spend $1,000 - $5,000 / month on their own ad campain that dosn't work efficently if at all.
    Watch this it's very informative: (this is NOT an affiliate link, I don't give a **** if you buy it or not- very good concept that's all) http://www.instantlocaltraffic.com/f...-and-whiskers/
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    Strike where their is lots of Competition!!!!.....If you don't........... it's like opening a business in the country.....
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  • Profile picture of the author NewParadigm
    Yep, just a blowoff answer, haven't really felt him out to get to his real objection. Heck, he just might be intimidated not knowing anything about IM. Just talk benefits, not the process or technology. A few probing questions might help, but don't waste too much time on the guy. Ask open ended questions.

    Under what circumstances would you take a look?
    What needs to change for you to consider?
    What areas of your business are you working on to improve?
    What areas are a pain in the rear? why?
    What ares of biz are doing well? why?
    Which restaurants in town that you know are sucking wind and might want my help?
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  • Profile picture of the author Adrian John
    Restaurant owner told me "I have all the the business I can handle right now."
    My Answer: That's great.I really didn't realized that's soooo much potential in this area. I'm sure restaurants around (or name 2-3 of them) would love to get more of the business you have now.

    What would the owner say than? )
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  • Profile picture of the author sloanjim
    i feel the same. A lot of offline biz simply do not really need any kind of online Marekting.

    I've never done a search for a restaurant online. Not saying it isn't done but the vast majority do not.

    Restaurants don't need Google. Let's be realistic here. Sure, it may help business, but it's not essential.
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  • Profile picture of the author sloanjim
    what from Google searches? You are about that? Proof?

    My Answer: That's great.I really didn't realized that's soooo much potential in this area. I'm sure restaurants around (or name 2-3 of them) would love to get more of the business you have now.
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  • Profile picture of the author sloanjim
    1st rule of biz: Go where the money is.

    That is why I have been working on starting a carpet cleaning business on the side that I may indeed hire out at some point, and is why I have some interest in doing some various things in marketing. I'm also working on building my 6 months "emergency fund" ala Dave Ramsey.
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  • Profile picture of the author sloanjim
    Or simply refuse to work with "liars". Are you so desperate for biz you weill overlook lies and try to do biz with them? That bad huh....

    People lie when you try to sell them things. It is your duty to yourself and your potential customers to get through the lies to the truth by asking more questions. That way you can collect a check and help your prospects. You must uncover the real objections before you can close them.
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  • Profile picture of the author sloanjim
    Look, lets' be fair, They have proably already been scamemd like 100+ times with hyped up B*S* already and their guard is up. Can't blame them.

    Like buying a 2nd hand car these days dealing with Offline I.M salesman.

    If you have to work SOOOO hard to concince them maybe you are targettign the wrong kind of person/biz?

    People lie when you try to sell them things. It is your duty to yourself and your potential customers to get through the lies to the truth by asking more questions. That way you can collect a check and help your prospects. You must uncover the real objections before you can close them.
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    • Profile picture of the author Aaron Doud
      Originally Posted by sloanjim View Post

      If you have to work SOOOO hard to concince them maybe you are targettign the wrong kind of person/biz?
      This is so true if selling is hard work you are doing it wrong. Either by targeting the wrong people(not qualified well) or because you don't have the skills to sell well.

      Doing Sales is easy(relatively of course) because people like to buy. Hell some of us are pure impulse buyers.

      Remember even with something with low percentage sales like phone sales the numbers alone tell you that you will make sales.
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      • Profile picture of the author Dan DaSilva
        Originally Posted by Aaron Doud View Post

        This is so true if selling is hard work you are doing it wrong. Either by targeting the wrong people(not qualified well) or because you don't have the skills to sell well.

        Doing Sales is easy(relatively of course) because people like to buy. Hell some of us are pure impulse buyers.

        Remember even with something with low percentage sales like phone sales the numbers alone tell you that you will make sales.
        Sorry, but I have to disagree with you on this. Experiencing a case like this doesn't mean you target the 'wrong businesses' or your sales skills are 'underdeveloped' (by the way, I don't believe there is such a thing as a wrong business...).

        Casual people like to buy on impulse, business people don't. The difference here is you first need to properly qualify the prospect before there is an opportunity to sell:

        1) Find out if they have a problem we could provide a solution for,
        2) Monetize that problem to demonstrate what he's missing or loosing and create a state of urgency at the same time
        3) Make sure if he's interested in discussing your solution in detail
        4) Make sure he is willing and able to pay for what we ask which should include a 50% down payment before you get busy

        Once, you manage to do this in a relaxed, non-pressure and non-salesy way, success is a matter of persistence before anything else.

        Think about it: You are coming from a place to help companies grow their business. And in the process you are demonstrating the value you can bring in to make this happen. If there is no interest, for whatever reason, there is simply no interest and it doesn't make sense to try to turn this around! It's not your fault and you don't spend time and energy to meditate about it. Cultivate an attitude of 'not needing your business' and think: No problem, I wish you all the best! Next please...

        Best,
        Dan
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  • Profile picture of the author sloanjim
    Yeah Ok I can buy into that. Wouldn't do any harm..but i still suspect it won't be big numbers. Msot will be word of mouth or simply walking around..but yeah might be a useful addition. "Might be" for the right price.

    When you travel, out of towners are looking for a certain type of restaurant, type it in on the phone and bam....Google Places pops up the top ones. Take a look at the reviews and choose one.
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  • Profile picture of the author moneylab
    This is another example of why I avoid doing businesses with restaurants, no matter how much I think they need web services. I've been in sales for 15 years, and besides doctors, no other type of business is as difficult to try and do business with, for a variety of reasons. Plenty of other businesses out there who are more receptive and nicer to work with, IMO.
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  • Profile picture of the author Dan DaSilva
    SeƱora Padilla,

    I guess it depends a little on the personality type, how far you wanna go. I am very familiar with your experience and I make them myself. Face it, most of businesses you contact won't be interested in what you have to offer, that's just the name of the game.

    That's the reason why you should qualify those contacts first and as early as possible, not by telling them what great things youd could do for them but by asking them about their biggest challenges with their business. Remember: you wanna be a consultant not a sales girl! This way, you will get information from your prospect and can then take it from there. Think about if you can provide a solution to resolve one or several of his challenges and ask him if he's interested in discussing this any further. If no, against popular belief ask him why straight away. In 9 out of 10, times he will tell you something. Based on that you can either go on or say thanks you and go. If he's interested make sure you check if he understands the value you offer and if he would be ready and able to invest in it, knowing what he will be getting. If you are not sure, ask him if he could at all handle more business because that's what you are here for. And so forth.

    Stopping people from wasting your valuable time is one of the most important skills you coul acquire as a business person, in my experience. If they are not interested and don't believe in or understand the leverage of new media (internet, social media, mobile) marketing, don't try to coonvince him, if it'ss a hassle in the beginning it will be later as well! Relax and go on and remember: it's all a numbers game!

    Best,
    Dan
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  • Profile picture of the author mil0x
    How did you introduce yourself? Let me take a quick guess: I'm a website designer from..

    I love the 'pitch' Jason Kanigan introduced on the Telemarketing Forum.. It's all about monetizing the problem. Use the Google Keyword Tool to find out how many people are searching for 'restaurant city', tell them: can I have a few minutes of your time so I can start sending a part of those xxxx people per month over to your restaurant?
    Then let them tell you how much new clients they think they're gonna get. Then let them tell you how much the average client is spending. Then let them do the math how much revenue those new clients will bring in per month. Then let them calculate the yearly revenue. Then let them decide how much they're going to invest in your solution to get these clients ('website' price)..

    THEN you close them and tell them, yes, the visual end result of your investment will be a website. But I do much more than 'just' making a website. I want you to see your investment as an ongoing, huge advertisement to get qualified leads in a market that you've never even touched.
    You don't have to get into the technical stuff of SEO etc. Most of them will be scared if you do, thinking they don't have the knowledge and they just can't relate to what you're saying. Some will insist, so tell them.. but not before you let them answer this question: 'Mr ____, when someone comes ordering a meal at your restaurant.. do you give them a tour in the kitchen? Do you give them the recipe of the meal? Do you show them the ingredients? OR do you serve whatever they ordered, give them a great time and service and then bill them?' [That would be the last option, Mr ____, right? We do nothing different then what you do in your restaurant, we get you the result or the meal if you'd like. Provide you with an awesome service and take the payment. BUT, if you really insist on getting the recipe, our technical solution.. here's what we do: .. ']. Most will actually stop you and tell you it's not needed..

    If they really insist they have enough business after you've monetized the problem, or actually the solution.. just let them go.. unqualified prospect.
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    • Profile picture of the author kat57
      If they have all the customers they need then how about enhancing the quality of the service their existing customers get?
      Mobile friendly webpage with tap to call buttons, sms program
      to drive existing customers to the location when certain nights are slow, etc.
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  • Profile picture of the author RentItNow
    It's just a blow off to you. Go onto the next and next. Very typical. They are not your customer and if they were they would be nothing but trouble wanting you to prove yourself before they pay you...etc. etc.

    If you really really wanted it as an account, you can use the Limited Opening trick. It is working REALLY well for me but with BIG accounts I am going after. It is basically telling them you are only going to work with one restaurant category per city and I have also sent this letter to the other restaurants in their cat.
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    I have no agenda but to help those in the same situation. This I feel will pay the bills.
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  • Profile picture of the author DueDiligenceDiva
    I think your initial reaction is spot-on. Move on to the next potential customer, with the possibility of checking back on this one in the future.

    In my business, the most important component is authentic relationship-building, and that is where I always keep my focus. Many prospects who initially aren't in the right mindframe or business condition to need/want my services eventually come around to ME and ask for help, because I stay in personal contact and keep things positive, with no pressing sales agenda.

    On the flip side, I have also learned in my offline consulting business to self-select clients who understand the value of marketing, as too many expect champagne service on a water budget (not even beer, LOL).

    Best of luck to you!
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  • Profile picture of the author samwatson1
    Thanks a lot friends for sharing your useful tips and suggestions.
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  • Profile picture of the author philipdwyer
    Not everyone is ready to be a business owner. Call their direct competitor and get them signed up instead. Next, someone else is waiting.
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    Philip Dwyer
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  • Profile picture of the author cosmeticsKing
    see the guy didnt take u up on the offer because he didnt belive you could help him.
    you cant control it .it could be your clothes .it could be your not streetsmart like him.
    people buy from people who are like them and that they believe can deliver

    plain and simple

    dont look at the client as he was at fault

    he didnt lose money you did

    improve your selling and never blame customers for not buying accept responcibility

    there are two customers in this world Price and Value

    this guy was Value
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  • Profile picture of the author Jason Kanigan
    When you get a prospect who tries to get rid of you like this, realize they are probably lying. They do this to protect themselves from getting ripped off. You and I do this, too, when we're prospects.

    Check out this post, where I explain in detail what's happening, and exactly what you can say to effectively deal with it.
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  • Profile picture of the author contentment1st
    As a former 16 year operator in the restaurant industry, I think we're attempting to fix something that doesn't need fixing. I have one friend who's been operating a successful restaurant on a lake in Alabama for over 15 years Wed-Sat. Packed all four days. His motivation is quality of life. His wife works the business with him.

    I have two friends here in South Carolina who operate a 3 million and a 4 million operation seven days per week. Lines out the door most lunch and dinner shifts. Both with well over 15-20 years in their respective locations.

    All three of these guys are street smart, hard working individuals. They've taken what they've learned to be universal truths in the restaurant industry and applied them consistently across the board...Great menu, great atmosphere, exceptional customer service and a consistent daily focus.

    Neither of these three gentlemen want or need an online/offline marketing program. None of them want or need a growth strategy, a succession plan or an exit strategy.

    Experience in both the restaurant industry and offline marketing tells me it would be both presumptuous and a waste of my time or yours to even suggest any of these things.

    None of the three are capable of doing much more than checking their email and one of them doesn't even have an email account. Now that I think about it, they rarely go online, they don't watch reality shows and they spend most of their free time outdoors.

    I envy the fact that all three live free of all the distractions we face and this keeps them grounded, sincere and genuine.

    Without those distractions, they're "in touch" and they have a real handle on the "pulse" of their business, their family and their community. As a full time Offliner, I've mostly forgotten what that's like.

    We tend to forget that there are people out there who are wildly successful even though they're 10-15 years behind the times on technology and don't know anything about the online/offline world.

    But you know what? These guys don't give a s*#t. All three are happy; content. They represent a class of restaurant owners who are not going to change and none of us here should expect them to do so.

    I admire all three for their work ethic and I applaud them for their steadfast resistance to what we consider to be imperative to their success.

    Work a day in their shoes setting up for a shift, prepping food, cooking, serving customers that are lined out the door, washing dishes, cleaning up and closing for the evening and you'll get an appreciation for why these specific type of True Operators don't want or need your help.

    Follow them to the bank the following morning and watch them deposit their huge cash deposit from the day before and you'll understand why you are not relevant and why they'll always give you a "Thanks, but No Thanks".

    The good news for us? These guys are the rare exception. Admire them, respect them, but then...move on.

    Applaud their laser focus on their business and apply that same focus to your own.
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  • Profile picture of the author Sardent
    Originally Posted by ypadilla View Post

    Restaurant owner told me "I have all the the business I can handle right now." Didn't care about next month. Today was good, so next month and next summer would therefore be good too. He's nowhere on Google and doesn't care.
    That's when you say "Good to hear in this economy."
    Turn to leave but before you hit the door, ask him who his direct competitor is, or better yet if you know who it is, mention that that means "XYZ" company will definitely want what you have to offer.

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  • Profile picture of the author Rotwic
    Google might not be the best deal in this situation. Brand marketing is where id stress on. Build a community of fans via facebook or twitter. More the social media coverage, more chances of your restaurants being reviewed online (hence more exposure) and greater word of mouth chances.
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  • Profile picture of the author newfriends
    Well I would say to show him the ROI or some of your work that you did and it gave you great results. OR give him a piece of cookie he will know the taste. OR give him 100% money back if you don't improve his business(You should only say this when you are confident and you can give him some more business at-least what he invested.)

    Hope this helps you . Good Luck. Bye.
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  • Profile picture of the author MarketingMonk
    Oh I've come across such people too! In fact I have sold social media marketing to restaurant owners for over 2 years in my previous job. Most would just shy away from it and say that they are doing fine and don't want to go online. Sad thing.
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    • Profile picture of the author DABK
      Many of you talk about restaurant owners wanting and needing your services. It is highly irrelevant whether they need your services or not. If they need and don't want, they don't hire your. If they want and don't need, they'll hire you. If they need and want, they'll hire you.

      Find someone who wants what you're selling.

      To the OP. A few years ago, I had a real estate appraising company. I got to a point that I'd have paid you good money to show me how to get rid of clients. After a while, I raised my prices significantly, and got rid of some of them that way. Life was better.

      My problem was not a marketing problem but a business set up problem.

      Sometimes, business owners lie when they tell you they don't need marketing, sometimes, they tell you the truth.

      To Dan, who said, business owners, unlike private people, don't buy on impulse:

      I, as a business owner responsible for 7 appraisers and a receptionist/secretary, was once contacted by a rep for the local paper. For $1,200, she told me, they'd put something in the paper about me. I'd be in the company of prominent doctors and lawyers. It will come out on a Sunday in August. It will be as wide as the page was and 4 inches tall. It will say... and she read to me what she put together.

      And it was all about what a great dude I was. And I agreed and, without asking any questions about anything important, I said, Sure.

      Came to regret it, but bought it on impulse, just because she came at the right time and said pleasing things about me. Right time means, she called when there was a lull and I had money in the bank.

      Back to OP. He might have been in a place where he did not need... he definitely did not want... and have a good reason for it. Like others have said, move on... after you've tried to figure out why he doesn't want... for future reference, so you can better qualify in the future.

      Try calling on accountants who don't have a website... You soon learn that you're better off calling on accountant companies... those with more than accountant + 1 assistant companies.
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  • Profile picture of the author 300SMG
    It truly is amazing but even in today's day and age many business owners don't "get it". This type of response I find more times than not comes from these type of owners. It's usually because they themselves aren't Internet savvy. When I started my first freelance web design company in 2001, the number 1excuse I heard was I don't have a computer..or i dont go online..and to make my point..those business owners just didn't understand IM. it's our job to inform them of the benefits. And I don't know about anyone else but there is never enough business.
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  • Profile picture of the author rachelskiles114
    Great to be here in this kind of forum thread for Business Owner Has All the Business He Can Handle, good to view some of responses that gives a great idea for real estate.
    Thanks for the post.
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  • Profile picture of the author misterme
    Sometimes they don't need any help and are doing crazy fantastic business. Sometimes a cigar is a cigar. There are people in the restaurant business that know what they're doing and they don't need to show up in Google.
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    • Profile picture of the author Kevin Krebs
      Originally Posted by misterme View Post

      Sometimes they don't need any help and are doing crazy fantastic business. Sometimes a cigar is a cigar. There are people in the restaurant business that know what they're doing and they don't need to show up in Google.
      I agree. Ultimately I believe that as an offline marketing company we have a vision for each one of our clients. If that vision does not match up with the business owner, then the relationship probably won't last.

      For example...if you envision offering fantastic internet marketing services that help them grow into 10 chains within 5 years, the restaurant owner must desire the same vision of growth and increase wealth, as well as increase responsibility.

      However, if they are happy with their 1 restaurant and do not desire to grow whatsoever, because they're happy with the current profits and traffic into their restaurant, then that's great. No need to change their vision, but it's not a bad thing to plant the seed of a bigger vision and see if it grows in their mind with time.

      Bottom line, always offer selfless and stellar work, charge what you're truly worth, and deliver high quality services and you will be fine. If a restaurant, or any business for that matter feels currently satisfied, if you've planted the seed, then they will most likely come back to you if they're revenues start to slip in the future.
      Signature

      Kevin Krebs
      Offline Marketing Specialist
      Lifeshine Marketing, LLC
      www.LifeshineMarketing.net

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  • Profile picture of the author tomrichards317
    Such great to know this kind of forum thread that will the real estate business to be in success, thanks for the great valuable information.
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