Offline Sales VS. Offline Marketing...

39 replies
Im sure Allen doesnt want to segregate any more than he already has, but its becoming clear to me that offline sales and offline marketing are two different subjects.

I think alot of the head butting around here is because we havent made the distinction between the two...

In other words, alot of these posts are offline salespeople and techs who do ONLINE work, correcting each other constantly... comparing apples to oranges.

Just a random thought. Wanted share.

For instance, as long as Iamnameless knows how to do SEO, and he is offering an seo package... I dont really need to be a tech to sell his package for him. I just need to know his presentation.

But if I can sell and he cant, then I am valuable in an area of offline that he isnt.... (he can sell too BTW newbs- Just an example).

I think alot of the opportunity seekers here are spinning their wheels for months on end trying to learn how to become techs...and the techs are offended that they are calling themselves "pro's", just like I would be if I had worked hard on my skill and less experienced people were taking credit for being like me...

This battle shouldnt exist, because we can all be an asset to one another.

In truth, these newbies could easily just focus on learning the sales part to "make money" (because thats what we talk about at the WF) and in the process feed another warrior who needs work with their very special talent for selling.

In other words; their talent for offline "Customer Acquisition" (Oooh big word huh? lol)

To summarize:

Someone made a post the other day that had me thinking about this....and truly they are separate subjects - sales vs. marketing. Even though closely related.

This distinction also helps me understand better what the purpose of my own site should be.

Anyway, I thought this was an interesting distinction and wanted to share it. I think it will increase everyones understanding of one another.

-JD
#marketing #offline #sales
  • Profile picture of the author iAmNameLess
    You make a good point. There are many things this part of the forum is great for. There are so many sub niches in this forum though, that it expands far beyond just offline marketing and sales.

    This section of the board, I think is the fastest growing area and people are noticing the value in here is greater than the other areas of the forum. People want valuable responses so they ask some questions in THIS forum instead of some of the others. That is where you have the people that know how to sell something or act like they know how to sell it, come in as a technical pro on the matter when they really aren't and people yell out blasphemy! lol.
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    • Profile picture of the author John Durham
      Originally Posted by iAmNameLess View Post

      You make a good point. There are many things this part of the forum is great for. There are so many sub niches in this forum though, that it expands far beyond just offline marketing and sales.

      This section of the board, I think is the fastest growing area and people are noticing the value in here is greater than the other areas of the forum. People want valuable responses so they ask some questions in THIS forum instead of some of the others. That is where you have the people that know how to sell something or act like they know how to sell it, come in as a technical pro on the matter when they really aren't and people yell out blasphemy! lol.
      .................................Indeed.

      As far as this area being greater....?

      Well I guess that depends on what you want to learn, but this is where most of the "offline World" business experience is, and you get alot more common "general business sense" in here, than you would in other areas where alot of the guys who have been on the internet since they were born dont understand business outside of it, or that the principles of success at work for them extend beyond it.
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  • Profile picture of the author sandalwood
    John,

    You do raise a point that may or may be blurred. I looked up the definition of sales and marketing and this is what I found:

    sales/Noun:

    1.The exchange of a commodity for money; the action of selling something.

    2.A quantity or amount sold.


    mar·ket·ing/ˈmärkitiNG/Noun:

    The action or business of promoting and selling products or services.


    BTW, these aren't the only definitions but they do succinctly represent what we think of when we use the respective terms. It would appear to me that if Iamnameless, to use your example, was or wasn't an SEO expert wouldn't make much difference in his choice of selling his offline product.

    He could always outsource his SEO needs whether he said he was selling them or marketing them. The only distinction it would appear to me to be is, if we use the above definitions as our paramenters, in the promotion thereof.

    If he promotes himself as an SEO guy, again your example, than he is marketing. If he is merely selling something, and even if he doesn't have knowledge of the stuff he is selling, he is engaging in sales. Either way, he is selling products or services.

    The bottom line, I don't think your argument, as phrased, is strong enough for a segregation. Of course I'm not Allen so what I say may or may not be relevant. It is my opinion that in today's world, attempting to segregate marketing and sales is a waste of time.

    However, segragating tech stuff from sales/marketing isn't. We would all agree if you put a tech guy in a room in front of a client and a sales/marketing guy in front of the same client at the same time, the sales/marketing guy, in most cases, will win the client. They could both be selling the same software, system, WSO, whatever.

    There's my 2¢. Hopefully the feds haven't devalued the penny by the time I post this reply.

    Tom

    Originally Posted by John Durham View Post

    Im sure Allen doesnt want to segregate any more than he already has, but its becoming clear to me that offline sales and offline marketing are two different subjects.

    I think alot of the head butting around here is because we havent made the distinction between the two...

    In other words, alot of these posts are offline salespeople and techs who do ONLINE work, correcting each other constantly... comparing apples to oranges.

    Just a random thought. Wanted share.

    For instance, as long as Iamnameless knows how to do SEO, and he is offering an seo package... I dont really need to be a tech to sell his package for him. I just need to know his presentation.

    But if I can sell and he cant, then I am valuable in an area of offline that he isnt.... (he can sell too BTW newbs- Just an example).

    I think alot of the opportunity seekers here are spinning their wheels for months on end trying to learn how to become techs...and the techs are offended that they are calling themselves "pro's", just like I would be if I had worked hard on my skill and less experienced people were taking credit for being like me...

    This battle shouldnt exist, because we can all be an asset to one another.

    In truth, these newbies could easily just focus on learning the sales part to "make money" (because thats what we talk about at the WF) and in the process feed another warrior who needs work with their very special talent for selling.In other words, his talent for offline "Customer Acquisition" (Oooh big word huh? lol)

    Anyway,

    Someone made a post the other day that had me thinking about this....and truly they are separate subjects - sales vs. marketing. Even though closely related.

    This distinction also helps me understand better what the purpose of my own site should be.

    Anyway, I thought this was an interesting distinction and wanted to share it. I think it will increase everyones understanding of one another.

    -JD
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  • Profile picture of the author John Durham
    Awesome Tom, thats what this is for, to make a clearer distinction. We are pondering together.

    Another note Tom is that Sales people are sometimes narrowly focused and dont understand "markets", but they dont have to in order to do what they do well.

    To be clearer, I have had alot of great sales people who dont know anything but their pitch. I wouldnt call them "marketers" necessarily, because they dont get the broader perspectives.
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    • Profile picture of the author sandalwood
      Originally Posted by John Durham View Post

      Awesome Tom, thats what this is for, to make a clearer distinction. We are pondering together.

      Another note Tom is that Sales people are sometimes narrowly focused and dont understand "markets", but they dont have to in order to do what they do well.
      You are absolutely correct. To prove your point, we could go into another round of ins lead genning. But why, we killed that niche already. :-)

      I hope I didn't wear out my ponderer...
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  • Profile picture of the author John Durham
    Lol. We didnt kill lead gen Tom.

    Oh I see what you are saying, we "covered" it. Yes we did. Agreed.


    I think a salesperson may be a marketer but not an "offline Marketer", which is what we generally refer to as a person who makes web page reach an offline market.

    If someone like Iamnameless does that, and I only rep his product/marketing package, then Im a sales person, but he's the actual offline marketer, in my view.

    Does that help clarify what I intended to say? Maybe could have said it better.

    Im making this post primarily to tell newbies that you dont have to feel pressured to be everything...Just be good at what you do, and it can benefit everyone including yourself.

    There was probably a better word than "tech" ie; the actual "offline marketer". Who doesnt even necessarily need to be a "tech" (ie; the one who does the hands on page building).

    Edit: Offline marketing to most of us, is the act of getting a business person's offer in front of his market...but Offline Sales (to me) is the act of getting the offline marketers package in front of the business owner.
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  • Profile picture of the author RedShifted
    edit: question removed to keep focus on original post.

    Thanks John.
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    • Profile picture of the author John Durham
      Let me put it in simpler terms redshift.


      If you can say a presentation, and sell a package for an offlline marketing company to a local business, then you are a "sales person" for an offline marketing company. All you need is a sales pitch.

      Technically you may be a marketer of a narrow sort, but there is a clear line between you and the one who is actually marketing the business owners site to the local community and making his marketing work.

      You just sold the website...you may be 16 years old and just a good talker who couldnt draw traffic , and doesnt understand how to market a web page to the public, or anything else outside of your pitch and rebuttals.

      You just know how to say a sales pitch to a business owner, which in my book makes you and offline "sales person"...Not "A marketer of offline businesses".

      Hopefully that helps.

      Unless Im wrong, we tend to think of offline marketing as the act of "Marketing an offline business owner online and helping him achieve online sales...".
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  • Profile picture of the author mojo1
    Thanks John for this distinction. I personally have come to conclusion as of last week that I truly want to act and function as an Offline Salesperson and not an Offline Marketer at this point in my life.

    The way you've unpacked this along with the previous distinctions made by David Miller have made me no longer ashamed or dejected by admitting this to myself.

    A really good salesperson who uses the phone as their selling instrument of choice is a force to be reckoned with and can make a thriving economic lifestyle for themselves and their family.
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    • Profile picture of the author John Durham
      Originally Posted by mojo1 View Post

      Thanks John for this distinction. I personally have come to conclusion as of last week that I truly want to act and function as an Offline Salesperson and not an Offline Marketer at this point in my life.

      The way you've unpacked this along with the previous distinctions made by David Miller have made me no longer ashamed or dejected by admitting this to myself.

      A really good salesperson who uses the phone as their selling instrument of choice is a force to be reckoned with and can make a thriving economic lifestyle for themselves and their family.
      Thanks. "You" are the person I posted this for!

      You dont have to feel the pressure to know "everything" in order to make money in the offline marketing world...you could simply set appointments for someone who does and never even worry yourself over the rest. Or have your own company representing another persons product who is an offline business "marketer".

      You will serve a valuable function, just as a "sales person".
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    • Profile picture of the author kenmichaels
      Originally Posted by mojo1 View Post

      Thanks John for this distinction. I personally have come to conclusion as of last week that I truly want to act and function as an Offline Salesperson and not an Offline Marketer at this point in my life.

      A really good salesperson who uses the phone as their selling instrument of choice is a force to be reckoned with and can make a thriving economic lifestyle for themselves and their family.
      Welcome to the fold.

      Now that you understand what it is you truly want,

      you finally have the control you have been looking for ...
      and your life will never be the same.
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      Selling Ain't for Sissies
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  • Profile picture of the author mojo1
    It's a little scary admitting this on such a public forum but hopefully others who have and are stressing out trying to do too much to soon can just partner up with another person who excels in an area they don't all while truly learning and increasing in knowledge and positive results.
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    • Profile picture of the author John Durham
      Originally Posted by mojo1 View Post

      It's a little scary admitting this on such a public forum but hopefully others who have and are stressing out trying to do too much to soon can just partner up with another person who excels in an area they don't all while truly learning and increasing in knowledge and positive results.
      Doesnt have to be embarrassing, or scary. Whats embarrassing is when you have a product , or know how to market offline businesses, but you cant get anyone to buy a site from you. lol

      Having sales knowledge alone is a HIGHLY valuable asset in a community like this without claiming to be an offline marketer.

      You know something they dont and vice/verse.

      I use to believe in cross training employees, but now Im of the mindset to keep blinders on every person who serves a specific function, and you get more productivity.

      The heel of a 100 lb womans shoe will break ground before an elephants foot will, because the pressure is concentrated on a more focused point, even though there is less weight/substance.
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      • Profile picture of the author PaulCook
        Originally Posted by John Durham View Post

        Doesnt have to be embarrassing, or scary. Whats embarrassing is when you have a product , or know how to market offline businesses, but you cant get anyone to buy a site from you. lol

        Having sales knowledge alone is a HIGHLY valuable asset in a community like this without claiming to be an offline marketer.

        You know something they dont and vice/verse.

        I use to believe in cross training employees, but now Im of the mindset to keep blinders on every person who serves a specific function, and you get more productivity.

        The heel of a 100 lb womans shoe will break ground before an elephants foot will, because the pressure is concentrated on a more focused point, even though there is less weight/substance.
        I agree, but many people are scared of offline marketing. Many people have "sales person block". They are afraid of cold calling, meetings etc (not me). Good coaching would help them a lot to get over it.
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        • Profile picture of the author John Durham
          Originally Posted by PaulCook View Post

          I agree, but many people are scared of offline marketing. Many people have "sales person block". They are afraid of cold calling, meetings etc (not me). Good coaching would help them a lot to get over it.
          This is why it will always be true that some succeed and some dont. You have to play by successes rules.

          Its classic and it will never change "successful people do what failures wont". Its pretty simple. I honestly think my first report which is floating around here for free somewhere in this section is some of the best training on here to get newbies started, not bragging, really, but I really think its true.

          Og mandino wrote some stuff that does not move me at all, in fact it bores me, but he has ONE book that literally changed my life and I believe it was divinely inspired...

          Well, I dont know about divinely inspired... but I think the great telemarketing war report is single handedly the most helpful offline book here (so far) for a newby starting out... and I only say that because it has brought the most results for the most people. Its free with no optin, so Im not trying to sell you, but its better than coaching IMHO.

          I dont know how it happened. I just wrote it thats all, but it seems to help alot of people.
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    • Profile picture of the author jimbo13
      Originally Posted by mojo1 View Post

      It's a little scary admitting this on such a public forum but hopefully others who have and are stressing out trying to do too much to soon can just partner up with another person who excels in an area they don't all while truly learning and increasing in knowledge and positive results.
      Mojo

      This is actually what business is.

      Garden Centres, for example, are set up by people who have a passion for gardening.

      But they don't make the lawnmowers they sell.

      So what is your passion?

      Then find the supplier of it and sell that. You will enjoy your life so much more.

      Dan
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  • Profile picture of the author RedShifted
    I've always found it odd how telemarketers are called "telemarketers" instead of "telesellers".

    How is it more marketing than sales when sales is more the goal than marketing?
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  • Profile picture of the author John Durham
    @ Red

    In the offline world I usually call them TSR's, good point.

    Originally Posted by kenmichaels View Post

    Welcome to the fold.

    Now that you understand what it is you truly want,

    you finally have the control you have been looking for ...
    and your life will never be the same.
    Ken,

    This post is to help them understand what they "dont have to be" in order to fit into a slot, and participate at WF and make money.
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  • Profile picture of the author FormerWageSlave
    Marketing and sales have always been two entities. Marketing's job is to deliver sales ready leads.
    Signature

    grrr...

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    • Profile picture of the author John Durham
      Originally Posted by FormerWageSlave View Post

      Marketing and sales have always been two entities. Marketing's job is to deliver sales ready leads.
      Indeed, we often hear the term , or see departments called "Sales and Marketing".

      Closely intertwined at times, but not the same. You dont have to be an offline marketer to make money being an offline sales person for an offline marketer. Your function is just as important.

      As pointless as this post may seem, that understanding is important for some. Especially those who came here seeking an answer to make money and feel overwhelmed that they have too much to learn first.
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      • Profile picture of the author FormerWageSlave
        As one whose sales skills lie well below my marketing abilities, the divide has been all to clear.

        Originally Posted by John Durham View Post

        Indeed, we often hear the term , or see departments called "Sales and Marketing".

        Closely intertwined at times, but not the same. You dont have to be an offline marketer to make money being an offline sales person for an offline marketer. Your function is just as important.

        As pointless as this post may seem, that understanding is important for some. Especially those who came here seeking an answer to make money and feel overwhelmed that they have too much to learn first.
        Signature

        grrr...

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      • Profile picture of the author Fernando Veloso
        Originally Posted by John Durham View Post

        As pointless as this post may seem, that understanding is important for some. Especially those who came here seeking an answer to make money and feel overwhelmed that they have too much to learn first.
        But it's also a "dangerous" reminder. Some of the newcomers don't have a clue of "what" they're selling and that can be (and often IS) damaging for them - especially in the early days when they need to build a good rep.

        That's why we drop the "learn it first" advice so often. At least that's what I do.

        lol
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        People make good money selling to the rich. But the rich got rich selling to the masses.
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  • Profile picture of the author Jason Kanigan
    Think about it this way:

    Marketing is what you do to get them to talk to you.

    Sales is what you do when they are talking to you.

    So a drip campaign is marketing. When they're ready, they know about you and you're who they call.

    A squeeze page is sales. They landed here after announcing they were looking for something specific, and they should be ready to buy. The purpose of the page is to induce them to buy from you.

    A print advertisement is marketing. People get attracted by the ad, then call in. Once they're talking with us, that's sales.

    Ask: are they qualified and ready to buy right now? Then it's sales. Otherwise, it's marketing.
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  • Profile picture of the author Aussieguy
    ...in the same way, having sales skills or marketing skills is not the same as having management skills. Great management skills will build a great business...and you could be the worst sales person, marketing person, and technical person all in one. A great manager is able to get people together to accomplish a goal using available resources.

    Anyway, what I was really chiming in for was to say (probably worth its own thread): The whole freelance/self-employed thing IMO gets confused on the forum with business ownership at times. Both are great, but different.
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  • Profile picture of the author anthonytori1
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    • Profile picture of the author sandalwood
      John,

      A slice of what you said:

      "Im making this post primarily to tell newbies that you dont have to feel pressured to be everything...Just be good at what you do, and it can benefit everyone including yourself."

      Imagine if people ran with this. We'd see more success than anyone thought possible. Why? You can't be good at EVERYTHING. We aren't built that way, If we were good at everything, there wouldn't be a WF.

      That one sentence alone exploded the point. Heck you could have written just this phrase:

      "Just be good at what you do..."

      Why would that have worked too?

      Because that is the entrance way to the road towards _____________ (you fill in the blank).

      Just my 2¢...
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      • Profile picture of the author John Durham
        Originally Posted by sandalwood View Post


        "Just be good at what you do..."
        Yes, "Be good at what you do" AND "Dont feel the need to be good at what you dont do yet..." There are plenty of opportunities around here to make money regardless of where you are starting from...

        "You dont have to be a web designer, or play one on TV, to make money selling offline services", plenty of people will give you an opp to sell for them!

        However, if I hadnt made it interesting they would skim it, and not think about it...". Something you get to know after a few years of sales training and messing with humans. Little silent truths that make all the difference.

        How you put something is the difference between someone skimming vs. engaging their mind.
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        • Profile picture of the author sandalwood
          Originally Posted by John Durham View Post

          Yes, "Be good at what you do" AND "Dont feel the need to be good at what you dont do yet..." There are plenty of opportunities around here to make money regardless of where you are starting from...

          "You donr have to be a webdesigner, or play one on TV, to make money selling offline services", plenty of people will give you an opp to sell for them!

          However, if I hadnt made it interesting they would skim it, and not think about it...". Something you get to know after a few years of sales and messing with humans. Little silent truths that make all the difference.
          I hear ya...(sorry couldn't resist)
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          • Profile picture of the author ShayB
            My strong point is sales.

            I have been told that I can sell ice to Eskimos. By numerous people.

            They didn't say that I made the best ice ever, so I should go out and sell it to people. They said that I could sell ice to Eskimos.

            I know that phrase is cliché, but I think it really does illustrate a good point.

            I couldn't build a WordPress website if you had a gun to my head. I deal with a very low tech version of websites, and I don't even do those very much anymore because I have handed that over to my kids. I am probably one of the least techie people you would ever meet.

            However....

            If you offer a website service, give me the specs on what you sell/what you offer/what your different packages entail, then give me 20 minutes and I can come up with a script and I could sell it. The script may not be pretty, but I could make it work until I refined it according to my initial results on my calls. (Or any kind of service. I just use the website one since it's so common.)

            Sometimes I feel out of place in this forum because I don't offer the usual "offline" stuff - SEO, websites, social media, etc. I started off in off-line marketing offering writing services to off-line business owners, and then developed my own business from that.

            But I think that I do have something to offer because I have sales experience.

            If you can sell, you never have to worry about what the economy is like. You can make your own financial future from it.

            If you have a skill that is in demand - such as building websites - then you also have a valuable asset. If you don't have the skills to sell it, then you can easily come up with a win win situation by finding someone who can sell and offering him or her a mutually beneficial deal.

            The only drawback that I see is that sometimes the two groups I mentioned above - those who can sell and those who have the technical skills - don't view each other as equals. The one with the technical skills wants to try and get away with paying as little as possible to the salesperson - and vice versa - Because they view themselves as the one with the "real" talent.

            A good salesperson knows that he or she is good, and a good salesperson is not going to settle for 10 bucks an hour. I'm not talking about a telemarketer, per se, or appointment setter - I'm talking about a salesperson. A good salesperson is going to want a commission per sale, and not just five or 10% either.

            There are times when marketers have both the technical skills and sales skills - and those marketers are a force to be reckoned with. We have a number of those here on the forum. I don't need to mention names, because we know who they are.

            Then there are times where somebody has one skill or the other - either the technical skill or the sales skill. There's nothing wrong with that, because everyone has their talents. And there's nothing to say that you can't learn the skill you don't have right now.

            But in the meantime it just makes sense to me to find someone who has the skill that you don't and to join forces. Tech people joining forces with salespeople and vice versa.

            By doing so, you create a force to be reckoned with - because each of you brings a strength that the other one doesn't have. And in many ways it's even better than having a jack of all trades being a one-man operation - because each of you can focus on what your strength is.

            I would love to see more people on this forum join forces instead of trying to beat their heads up against the wall trying to learn the skill they lack. Instead of doing that, they could simply partner up with someone who has the skill that they lack and be making money while they learn whatever skill they need to - if they even decide to learn that skill, because if a partnership between salesperson and tech person is the right balance, I don't even see where anyone would want to do anything different.

            JMHO and YMMV
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      • Profile picture of the author DWolfe
        [QUOTE=sandalwood;6103732]John,


        "Im making this post primarily to tell newbies that you dont have to feel pressured to be everything...Just be good at what you do, and it can benefit everyone including yourself."
        QUOTE]

        Great point

        Problem is alot of these newbies venture into this forum from the main fourm and they are bombarded by a ton of information. Cold Calls, tele -sales, QR Codes, Direct mail, Etc.. Than some well respected members here are challenged every time they lay something basic out.

        Because the challenger is either going to release a WSO or is scared to try a proven method. (Cold calling) So the newbies get confused reading all this. Plus as John said so many have spent there life in the Online world they dont grasp the concept that certian old proven methods still work today..

        A tech savy newbie could help people who are not tech savy and visa versa. While respecting each other. Would be a great win-win for both. If the newbies focus on one thing they are good at than hopefully they wont be pressured.
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  • Profile picture of the author mojo1
    Totally agree with you Shay.

    Now if only the "techs" and "teles" can make things happen and end 2012 with a bang that would be awesome!
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  • Profile picture of the author John Durham
    Funny Shay, someone in the offline world just said those exact words to me this very morning "You could always sell ice cubes to eskimo's whenever you wanted...". Thats a good compliment!
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    • Profile picture of the author ShayB
      Originally Posted by John Durham View Post

      Funny Shay, someone in the offline world just said those exact words to me this very morning "You could always sell ice cubes to eskimo's whenever you wanted...". Thats a good compliment!
      I think it is, too.
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    • Profile picture of the author Jerry McGough
      Hi john,
      I'm going to sidetrack a bit, so I'll keep it brief.

      There's also completely different approaches that work best, depending wheter people are working "Local" or national/global.

      If Allen ever does expand the offline section, it would be helpful to also zero in on "Local" to some degree.
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  • Profile picture of the author cuttingedge
    I look at marketing/advertising and sales as one and the same and should be measured by the salesman's standards, in other words, both are there to make sales. They are successful if there is profit, so you must measure the cost of each to determine results and each needs to stand on its on.

    Advertising should be written for the typical person, just like you are talking with them one on one and you should tell the complete story of your product. You wouldn't tell a salesman he has only one minute and I wouldn't shorten your advertising until it tells the complete story as this maybe the only time you get the prospects complete attention.

    Some of the best advertising guys I know came from a sales background. They find out what the typical customer wants and write the ad according to them. Those that show interest will read the ad no matter how long it is.

    Marketing usually requires 7-12 touches before you have a buyer, so do yourself a favor, and write the complete story, as if you will never see or hear from that propect again.
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  • Profile picture of the author InTh3Moment
    John, thanks for the thoughtful thread and posts. I was wondering if you would mind sharing your report and what exactly the mandino writing was that changed your life, I'm very interested now. Thanks!
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  • Profile picture of the author Michael Bucker
    As an offline sales trainer I can tell you there is a vast difference in selling and marketing. People not understanding the difference has cause many to continue in struggle.

    Marketers should hire strong sales people and strong sales people should hire great marketers. Unless you have the time to master both and the decipline to do so let the expert do his job he will make you money lots of it.

    No offense to any other post but if you continue to believe that marketing and sales are one in the same you will be losing money. i train veteran sales people and super sharp sales people how to market all the time. Two seperate worlds that may look the same to many, but are decieved by that falsehood.
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  • Profile picture of the author acharyabbs
    Great discussion thanks for this big discussion I learned lot of new things..
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  • Profile picture of the author eguinan
    I am so glad that I came across this thread! I was very frustrated today with a couple people on the forum hating on "sales people" and in particular cold calling. I love the idea of partnering. A person just can't be fabulous at everything.

    Thank you!
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  • Profile picture of the author anamikasingh
    Purpose is same but Offline marketing is good choice rather than telesales.
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