Eat That Frog! Overcoming the Common Objection

29 replies
It has been a long time since I first posted this vid, and there are so many new questions about cold calling in the forum now, that I thought sharing it would be really worthwhile. Used to be you had to sign up for it at my site, but here it is.

If you've made calls, and noticed the same couple of objections keep coming up, this video will show you how to make this issue work for you.

#common #eat #frog #objection #overcoming
  • Profile picture of the author PsycFa
    I do not get it why people did not comment on this post yet; but this video contains tons of top notch advices.

    But even though I agree on most of the points,I don't completely when you say they will not be that receptive to your services. There are strategies to work around this such as:

    1. Educating them properly - take your time and really show them what you are talking about (the fear of failure is one of the main aspects of rejecting your service; also the fear of stepping into the unknown)

    2. Competitors - give a mini case study on one of their main competitors that are actually using the service.

    3. Trial Basis - Cut down the cost and offer them a 1 week free trial in sms marketing, a bit risky but it is very rewarding
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    The aim of marketing is to make selling superfluous. The aim of marketing is to know and understand the customer so well that the product or service fits him and sells itself.....

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  • Profile picture of the author Jason Kanigan
    107 views and 1 comment and 1 thanks (thanks David)??

    Very, very strange.

    In fact, is this a microcosm of the forum lately? People who want stuff for free and care only about themselves?

    If you're a regular, what do you think?
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    • Profile picture of the author kenmichaels
      Originally Posted by Jason Kanigan View Post

      If you're a regular, what do you think?
      IMHO, its just a cycle, and right now we are in the middle of a cycle
      of other types of offline marketing. i.e non phone sales.

      Silly if you ask me, but it is what it is .... what is that saying...

      You can only lead a horse to water, you cant force him to drink it.
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  • Profile picture of the author wislndixie
    Thanks Jason, as always you're spot on. I love your WSO's
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  • Profile picture of the author BrandonMHowe
    Mmmm yummy frogs!

    Thanks for the share man, much appreciated!

    I always like "eating the frog," as you say...

    When acting in my foundation waterproofing consultant role,
    I always qualify budget towards the middle of my first 3-5 minute
    conversation...

    "...We use a fixed pricing chart, Joe.. that means the cost is
    always the same for an equal amount of work. We don't fudge
    pricing up or down, based on what we think you can afford.

    To get our product, system, and guarantee, there is one price --
    based on the depth and length of the treatment.

    Becase of this, some of the homeowners we speak with find that
    the investment can be a little out of reach.

    Joe, do you have any sort of budget set aside for this project?"

    My Gramps and Uncle have always been afraid to talk money with
    their prospects, but I found this approach to be very helpful for
    my prospects and myself. It has helped me to find creative ways
    for a few different homeowners to afford the job, using lines of
    credit or whatever other means... whereas, my gramps or uncle
    would have lost the job because they chose not to eat the money
    frog!

    Again dude, thanks for sharing! Spot on!



    BMH
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  • Profile picture of the author John Durham
    @ Jason

    Appreciate the contribution Buddy. Good stuff.

    Personally I have the face for radio and the voice for TV. You are braver than me!
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    • Profile picture of the author Claude Whitacre
      Great stuff, as always. One thing that was always a challenge was showing reps that, if they are getting the same objection over and over, it's because they are creating that objection in the prospect's mind.

      Maybe the biggest myth to overcome when training salespeople is that people really do not buy later (as long as you are already talking to the right person)...

      I can't count how many times a newbie has said "Claude, I have a sale...next Tuesday I'm supposed to call them back...after they get their insurance settlement..."

      I sure am getting a lot out of your, Ken Michaels, and John Durham's posts.
      Thank you.
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  • Profile picture of the author Jason Kanigan
    True, you can create the objection in the prospect's mind by being afraid of it.

    People are instinctually aware of the "hollow spot" that you step around and won't talk about.

    Part of selling success is being brave for short moments, so you can ask the questions that everyone else is afraid to discuss. With this technique, you talk about the main objection up front. If it isn't going to work, if this prospect is just dead set against whatever it is and there's no way you can change their mind...when would you rather find that out? At the start? Or hours or days into the conversation?
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  • Profile picture of the author digichik
    I have sales experience, but I am a bit rusty from being away from it for years. Your golden tidbits are really helpful to me. I was trained by major corporations, yet I still find major value in your posts.

    If only the newbies would learn to use the search feature here on WF, looking up posts by you, John Durham, iamnameless, David Miller, kenmichaels and a few others,
    they'd have more than enough information to build extremely profitable businesses.
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  • Profile picture of the author rallenk
    Jason..
    From the vantage point of an old, gnarly and gristled outside salesman, you bring up a fundamental selling technique that is as underused as it is effective. I believe most 'salesmen/women' innately do everything they can to avoid 'confrontation' because some "wise" sales instructor once told them that you might 'win the Battle but would lose the War!'

    That, of course , is Horse Puckey. Perception is reality so our job is to change the prospects perception. One cannot do that without first learning what 'Perception' our prospect has.

    Therefore getting to the core of the issue(s) right up front allows one to work on leveling the playing field, so to speak.

    Excellent post Jason.

    Kudos
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  • Profile picture of the author payoman
    Here's a question Jason :

    What's the best way to overcome potential customers who don't follow through? I have had quite a few potential clients recently verbally agree to the sale over the phone, but who fail to take action and make the deposit.

    Any tips to getting them to commit?
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    • Profile picture of the author Jason Kanigan
      Yeah, call 'em back and be Tough about it!

      "When we talked last week by phone, you knew that this was the right thing to do and you wanted to go ahead. Has anything changed?" (NURTURING tone)

      If anything has changed, you have to deal with those objections. What happened, and why?

      "Okay, now that that's dealt with, can we get started with the deposit today? That way I can get right to work on getting you results."

      I have to ask, though...why didn't you get the deposit right then and there in the first place? When I make a sale, I get the money. Otherwise it's not a sale.

      A sale is not a sale until you've taken the money to the bank.

      Originally Posted by payoman View Post

      Here's a question Jason :

      What's the best way to overcome potential customers who don't follow through? I have had quite a few potential clients recently verbally agree to the sale over the phone, but who fail to take action and make the deposit.

      Any tips to getting them to commit?
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      • Profile picture of the author payoman
        Originally Posted by Jason Kanigan View Post

        Yeah, call 'em back and be Tough about it!

        "When we talked last week by phone, you knew that this was the right thing to do and you wanted to go ahead. Has anything changed?" (NURTURING tone)

        If anything has changed, you have to deal with those objections. What happened, and why?

        "Okay, now that that's dealt with, can we get started with the deposit today? That way I can get right to work on getting you results."

        I have to ask, though...why didn't you get the deposit right then and there in the first place? When I make a sale, I get the money. Otherwise it's not a sale.

        A sale is not a sale until you've taken the money to the bank.
        OK, well here's the problem I had when I called them back...

        They had legitimate reasons for not depositing, such as 'I have been busy with work and the family and I want to make adjustments to the text before I go ahead.' This is presumably to reduce the amount of time it will take the job to get done, which makes sense.

        The other client said they need to get in touch with the company who did their photo's, and the old owner of their domain who they need to get access to the site, which also makes sense.

        Finally, the third client said he had been really busy with work and needed it to be done by a certain date, but to call him at the end of this week to get things started.

        So really, none of them had a bad excuse and there really was no legitimate reason I had to push them to get started, unless I made one up that didn't sound pushy.

        So, I dunno, what do you think Jason?
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        • Profile picture of the author Jason Kanigan
          Hmm. All put-offs of one kind or another. Notice how there's no urgency in any of these?

          We can certainly make allowances for our prospect's processes.

          #1 - "OK, I appreciate that family and work take a lot of attention. For the text adjustment, can you give me a date you think this will be done by? Then we can start our process."

          If the prospect won't give you a date, something is wrong. Go back through your sales process and find out where it fell down. If they do give you a date, calendar it, get the agreement that you'll call them on that date if they don't call you, and get the site started. If they put you off at that time, you have a bigger issue and personally I'd get Tough with them. "We agreed that we'd be able to start and you'd have the text revision done by this date...what happened?" Always ready to walk away.

          #2 - "Maybe I can help. What's blocking you from getting ahold of these people today?" If people want something, they'll move quickly enough. Again, stalling = something went wrong in your process.

          #3 - this person gave you a date. Call when he said. Be firm if there's any waffling. "Mr. Prospect...you told me this was urgent and...what was that deadline you gave me again? ____? We have to get this done by that date, right? It's not going to get done by itself, is it." This one imo has the best chance for a sale, because he gave you a date and seems to have a sense of urgency.

          All, however, are delays. Why did #3 put you off to the end of the week? What will have changed by then? (hint: ask these kinds of questions when prospects do this.) You have to be polite but firm. They all acknowledge that they need a website. What they're doing is like telling their doctor that No, they don't really need to take that prescription, wear that cast, do that physical therapy right now...it'll get better on its own maybe; and that's what you have to stand up and be Tough with them about. Do not empathize with their put-offs.

          Originally Posted by payoman View Post

          OK, well here's the problem I had when I called them back...

          They had legitimate reasons for not depositing, such as 'I have been busy with work and the family and I want to make adjustments to the text before I go ahead.' This is presumably to reduce the amount of time it will take the job to get done, which makes sense.

          The other client said they need to get in touch with the company who did their photo's, and the old owner of their domain who they need to get access to the site, which also makes sense.

          Finally, the third client said he had been really busy with work and needed it to be done by a certain date, but to call him at the end of this week to get things started.

          So really, none of them had a bad excuse and there really was no legitimate reason I had to push them to get started, unless I made one up that didn't sound pushy.

          So, I dunno, what do you think Jason?
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          • Profile picture of the author payoman
            Originally Posted by Jason Kanigan View Post

            Hmm. All put-offs of one kind or another. Notice how there's no urgency in any of these?

            We can certainly make allowances for our prospect's processes.

            #1 - "OK, I appreciate that family and work take a lot of attention. For the text adjustment, can you give me a date you think this will be done by? Then we can start our process."

            If the prospect won't give you a date, something is wrong. Go back through your sales process and find out where it fell down. If they do give you a date, calendar it, get the agreement that you'll call them on that date if they don't call you, and get the site started. If they put you off at that time, you have a bigger issue and personally I'd get Tough with them. "We agreed that we'd be able to start and you'd have the text revision done by this date...what happened?" Always ready to walk away.

            #2 - "Maybe I can help. What's blocking you from getting ahold of these people today?" If people want something, they'll move quickly enough. Again, stalling = something went wrong in your process.

            #3 - this person gave you a date. Call when he said. Be firm if there's any waffling. "Mr. Prospect...you told me this was urgent and...what was that deadline you gave me again? ____? We have to get this done by that date, right? It's not going to get done by itself, is it." This one imo has the best chance for a sale, because he gave you a date and seems to have a sense of urgency.

            All, however, are delays. Why did #3 put you off to the end of the week? What will have changed by then? (hint: ask these kinds of questions when prospects do this.) You have to be polite but firm. They all acknowledge that they need a website. What they're doing is like telling their doctor that No, they don't really need to take that prescription, wear that cast, do that physical therapy right now...it'll get better on its own maybe; and that's what you have to stand up and be Tough with them about. Do not empathize with their put-offs.
            Thanks Jason.

            I think SOME of those 3 have legitimate reasons. For example, one lady has to try to get ahold of a domain owner of her site to get the details, and the domain owner lives in another state.

            She also owns apartments (it's a website about the apartments), so she has to try to get ahold of some professional photo's from a realtors website or something or another.

            Funnily enough, she seemed like she was the 'most sold', since she went on about how she went to an online marketing seminar and how she wanted to 'get high up in Google' etc etc

            Yet, when I called her back, she was the only one who said "I'll get in touch with you when I'm ready"...In my experience, this has meant a 2 month + waiting period, which sucks.

            I would have thought my best option would be to just move onto new prospects and check back every 2-3 weeks, since I don't feel right "pushing" people into organising themselves. That will probably change when I get more confident, but yeah...Thanks for your help so far Jason, great work!
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            • Profile picture of the author kenmichaels
              Originally Posted by payoman View Post


              I would have thought my best option would be to just move onto new prospects and check back every 2-3 weeks, since I don't feel right "pushing" people into organising themselves. That will probably change when I get more confident, but yeah...Thanks for your help so far Jason, great work!
              you don't need to push.

              You can let them know you only have so many people you can work with at any given time.
              And those that pay .. play.

              You can also, provide a discount if they act NOW, but not a week from now.

              Some it will provide the motivation, some it wont.

              and you cant hurt yourself by trying.
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        • Profile picture of the author Claude Whitacre
          Originally Posted by payoman View Post

          OK, well here's the problem I had when I called them back...
          I can hear voices from my past sales guys starting off the conversation like this.

          Like Misterme said here. The momentum is gone. You killed it.
          And Jason is being more kind than I am.

          Getting the money isn't being pushy. It's the natural end to the agreement process. By not asking for the money, you send a signal (maybe unconsciously) that they are not supposed to buy.

          Buyers are in heat when they get a good sales presentation. That moment doesn't last. Certainly not as strong anyway.

          Not asking for the money shows the client (OK, non client) that you don't think the sale is done. You are not helping the client by hesitating.

          This isn't about being bold, pushy, aggressive, or anything like that.
          It's about finishing the sale.

          Why put your client through that agony of having to think about your proposition for days before deciding? Accept the money.

          Anyway, That's my rant.

          Oh, once a salesman (I use the term loosely) who "worked" for me came into my office and said "Wow Claude! That was a close one. They almost bought. They said YES five times!"

          Through gritting teeth, and I'm sure, a pulsing vein in my neck...I asked "So, how many times should a person say YES before you'll accept it?"

          Ahhh Memories.
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    • Profile picture of the author Claude Whitacre
      Originally Posted by payoman View Post

      Here's a question Jason :

      What's the best way to overcome potential customers who don't follow through? I have had quite a few potential clients recently verbally agree to the sale over the phone, but who fail to take action and make the deposit.

      Any tips to getting them to commit?
      I've had several salesman with the same problem. They think that here is an additional step between getting agreement, and getting a check (or credit card). After someone says "OK" they are expecting you to ask them for the money. Don't you?

      Them-"That sounds good"
      Me- "I agree. We need to get started on this. Would a check over the phone or a credit card be better?".

      Sales without money are Imaginary sales.

      Sorry, I just read a bunch more posts here that pretty much say the same thing.
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  • Profile picture of the author misterme
    Originally Posted by payoman View Post

    Here's a question Jason :

    What's the best way to overcome potential customers who don't follow through? I have had quite a few potential clients recently verbally agree to the sale over the phone, but who fail to take action and make the deposit.

    Any tips to getting them to commit?
    They commit to the sale on the phone but you don't ask for any payment then? I wouldn't call that being committed. They just verbally okayed the deal. At best.

    Calling back to ask for payment later loses any momentum you had on the first phone call. Plus they had time to speak to the spouse who told them they're crazy to hire you. Or they've had time to speak to the brother in law who told them he knows someone who can do it for less.

    You're better off closing them on the first call.

    So what it sounds like you want to know is how to ask them for payment.

    "I need $XXX to get started. How would you like to take care of this, mastercard, american express or visa?"
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  • Profile picture of the author jfambrini
    Thanks for sharing the video. Some great advice.
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  • Profile picture of the author misterme
    Originally Posted by payoman View Post

    OK, well here's the problem I had when I called them back...

    They had legitimate reasons for not depositing
    Once in a while, people may give a reason that doesn't sound legitimate but most people will come up with something plausible. What do you expect?

    As you don't know if they're being truthful or not, you can only judge by their actions. Actions do speak louder than words.

    Someone who wants to do business acts like someone who wants to do business. So you need to bottom line things. Here's how:

    If it isn't a clear, resounding "yes" then it's a "no."

    "I need to contact my guy first." That's a no.

    "I first need to get photos from my agent." That's a no.

    "I have been busy with work and the family and I want to make adjustments to the text before I go ahead." That's a no.

    If it turns out it really isn't a "no" don't fret. They'll let you know it's a yes. They won't want to lose out. That's what people who really want in, do.

    So they hand you these stalls and you could say, "fine. So you do want to do this then? [Prospect: "Yes."] OK. While you're contacting your guy in another state/making adjustments to your text/gathering your photos, let's go ahead and take care of the payment now so we can get you on board."

    If they really want in, they'll say yes. If they don't, they'll tell you something else.

    Yet, when I called her back, she was the only one who said "I'll get in touch with you when I'm ready"
    Because you bought her first stall. So now she stalled you again.
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    • Profile picture of the author Jason Kanigan
      Originally Posted by misterme View Post

      Once in a while, people may give a reason that doesn't sound legitimate but most people will come up with something plausible. What do you expect?

      As you don't know if they're being truthful or not, you can only judge by their actions. Actions do speak louder than words.

      ...

      If they really want in, they'll say yes. If they don't, they'll tell you something else.



      Because you bought her first stall. So now she stalled you again.
      Yup, misterme and I are on the same page here.

      Payo, you are empathizing with your prospects. Not a good thing for salespeople. I'm not saying don't be understanding. You definitely want to understand their world. However, empathizing with their excuses and stalls is not helpful. Look at it this way: you have nothing now. You don't have anything to "lose". People talk about "losing the sale"...they never had it in the first place! So be Tough and stand up to them. Don't be a jerk, but be firm.

      Believe you me, when someone wants something done, they'll get it done. Their contact is in another state, but they need a thing from them? They will hammer away by phone, email, fax, local friend etc. to get what they want ASAP. The urgency in these situations just doesn't seem to be there.

      Ask those questions I listed above.
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  • Profile picture of the author misterme
    Look at it also like this: When you ask for money, a strange thing happens. You either get the sale, or you get the objections to the sale. You don't get that in full force up to that point. Oh you may get some reflex knee-jerk objections. You may get questions. You may get statements. But the real objections don't really come until you ask for the money. And even then, they're usually a few layers down.

    So you have to ask for the money for the sale to proceed to its conclusion of either they buy or they don't. Asking for the money is when you find out if you have a buyer or a tire kicker.

    (although if you're really good at this, you find out ahead of time how serious they are.)
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  • Profile picture of the author Q Estherr
    Originally Posted by Jason Kanigan View Post

    If you've made calls, and noticed the same couple of objections keep coming up, this video will show you how to make this issue work for you.
    Hi Jason,

    I've made calls prospecting to people and on a few occasions, I come across a few very confrontational people.

    On an occasion, I called a lady providing services in the cleaning industry. Obviously when I called, I have never met her and she has never heard of my company. When I pitched my services to her, I know she's interested because even though she was pretty rude over the phone, she asked questions.

    Also, from my research, I see that she has been advertising quit heavily elsewhere on the internet and I was sure that what I'm offering to her is what she wants and can add value to her business.

    The problem comes when I think she was really rude and started making 'attacks' on me like
    - What's your company again? I've never heard of it. Do you know XXX company? Have you heard of them? They are really big companies offering services like you, you know
    - You said you already have leads and enquiries from your website and I have seen them from your email. But how do I know they are for real? How do I know??

    I was very patient and basically had to humble myself as I addressed her concerns. Her response definitely caught my off-guard.

    The reason why I continued speaking with her is because I know she would be interested in my services.

    Then we I met up with her, again, she was making attacks... I was really uncomfortable, but put up with it anyway. Finally, she said, "OK, everything is right for me, it is just the price. How about $XX instead of $XXX"?

    From what I can see, she is someone who will spend the money to purchase my services, but it was difficult for me to make her see the VALUE I was offering.

    In the end, I didn't go ahead with the deal and contacted another person to take up that particular service I offered...

    Sorry for the long message. So my question is
    1. How would you normally deal with such a person right from the start?
    2. What do you say when someone wants a cheaper price? You want to do business with them and don't mind charging cheaper, but there is a limit as to how far you can go right?

    Thanks in advance!
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    • Profile picture of the author Mwind076
      Originally Posted by Esther Koh View Post


      Sorry for the long message. So my question is
      1. How would you normally deal with such a person right from the start?
      2. What do you say when someone wants a cheaper price? You want to do business with them and don't mind charging cheaper, but there is a limit as to how far you can go right?

      Thanks in advance!
      1. Stand up for yourself. If she is combative she is NOT your ideal candidate. She will be that way before you sell her, when you are providing her a product/service and AFTER. Why would you want to deal with her when she's telling you she doesn't like you, doesn't know you and doesn't trust you? Move on, value yourself and your own sanity. (In the end, she wasted your time, has you second guessing yourself and went to someone else that will put up with her crap...not your ideal customer).
      2. My price is my price. I do not lower it. Period. If they can talk you down, then you don't see your own value...which means they won't either. The ONLY thing we do is offer extras. As in, if you buy _______ I'll throw in _______. It could be consultation time, more calling hours, etc. You could also offer 1/2 payments up front, then 1/2 in the middle as she gets comfortable, but NEVER lower your prices because a combative, potential customer suggests it.

      What I would have done...asked her for her email - if she said no, I would have thanked her for her time, told her my name and company and said "if you change your mind, let me know." Then I would have HUNG UP, and called my next prospect and the next and the next.
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    • Profile picture of the author Jason Kanigan
      Originally Posted by Esther Koh View Post

      Hi Jason,

      I've made calls prospecting to people and on a few occasions, I come across a few very confrontational people.

      On an occasion, I called a lady providing services in the cleaning industry. Obviously when I called, I have never met her and she has never heard of my company. When I pitched my services to her, I know she's interested because even though she was pretty rude over the phone, she asked questions.

      Also, from my research, I see that she has been advertising quit heavily elsewhere on the internet and I was sure that what I'm offering to her is what she wants and can add value to her business.

      The problem comes when I think she was really rude and started making 'attacks' on me like
      - What's your company again? I've never heard of it. Do you know XXX company? Have you heard of them? They are really big companies offering services like you, you know
      - You said you already have leads and enquiries from your website and I have seen them from your email. But how do I know they are for real? How do I know??

      I was very patient and basically had to humble myself as I addressed her concerns. Her response definitely caught my off-guard.

      The reason why I continued speaking with her is because I know she would be interested in my services.

      Then we I met up with her, again, she was making attacks... I was really uncomfortable, but put up with it anyway. Finally, she said, "OK, everything is right for me, it is just the price. How about instead of "?

      From what I can see, she is someone who will spend the money to purchase my services, but it was difficult for me to make her see the VALUE I was offering.

      In the end, I didn't go ahead with the deal and contacted another person to take up that particular service I offered...

      Sorry for the long message. So my question is
      1. How would you normally deal with such a person right from the start?
      2. What do you say when someone wants a cheaper price? You want to do business with them and don't mind charging cheaper, but there is a limit as to how far you can go right?

      Thanks in advance!
      This person views your service as a commodity. They are price shopping.

      She is also the behavioral type that values social proof. In the DISC profile, she's a 'D'...pushy, aggressive, and gives you the "credibility test" right off the bat. This is neither good nor bad; it just is.

      Read this. It'll show you how to stop people from getting your price and vanishing.

      In the short term, you probably did the right thing in passing on this prospect; however, in the long term it would be very valuable to you to learn how to build value.
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  • Profile picture of the author Q Estherr
    Yeah. Believe it or not, I felt horrible for DAYS after speaking to her... And spent a lot of time wondering if I didn't do a good job. And then it didn't help that I called up a friend who is a very successful property agent to speak to him about it and he said it was my problem - that I didn't do a good enough job to close the deal.

    He could be right. If it was him, he'd be able to close the deal and continue doing business with her.

    But I guess it really depends on how far I want to take things... Sometimes I think it'd be great if I could close the deal despite need to face someone like that. Even though she is rude, I'd have 'won' the challenge and have the last laugh because I got the deal - it's about feeding my own ego, lol.

    But I didn't really go that far. And thankfully she is the ONLY person who has behaved like that so far. PHEW.
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    Need to close more deals? Got 64 minutes?
    > Click here for deal closing secrets.
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