Client: It's winter now, so we dont need a website [LOL-NESS]

24 replies
I astounded at the responses I get when i apprach business for website design:

1. Business is a bit slow now [so we dont need a website?]
2. My dad is old-fashioned, he doesnt see the need for a website [he could just said he doesnt seee the need for new clients]

Sometimes, i think its not about cold-calling, scripts, gatekeepers, and all of the other techniques at hand, but purely just one word:

EDUCATION.

Business owners need to be educated. Period.

So, build relationships, and educate.

It's a brand new day.
#client #lolness #website #winter
  • Profile picture of the author Claude Whitacre
    You are getting those responses because you are giving a solution in search of a problem.

    Ask them about their advertising. Ask if they could use some new customers.
    Ask where do buyers go to find them.
    Give a few statistics about Google and Youtube taking over local search
    Show them that competitors are stealing their business. Online

    After they have absorbed that online is the place to be...then you can offer solutions.

    The objections we get tell us where our presentation went wrong. This can be fixed. The only objection you should get is a vague "We don't have the money.."


    Of course, the fastest way to cold call is to make a quick offer and get an "Interested" or "Not interested". at the beginning of the call. In large numbers, it's efficient, but if you are already talking to them, get them to tell you that they need a website.
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  • Profile picture of the author Jubu
    I agree with you completely. You have to be the one to educate them, because they will most likely never go out and find what they need (mostly because they don't know what to look for).
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  • Profile picture of the author Gladiator
    You might be going after the wrong markets but sometimes people just don't get it! Yes they need to be educated but if it too much work to do that then just move on to another potential client and maybe a better market that need clients and have money to spend!
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  • Profile picture of the author Jason Kanigan
    You are looking for people who know they need a website...not trying to convince people who don't have a website that they need one.

    If a person says "Nahh, I have all the clients i need, I don't need a website," unless you're a skilled salesperson, say "OK, thanks," hang up and move on. Faster & better for you.

    You are qualifying here. "Everybody" is not your customer.
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    • Profile picture of the author AlisonM
      I agree with Jason here, in the time it would take to turn around someone with no interest, you could have got sale(s) from people who start with some interest in getting a website.
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    • Profile picture of the author Sonny Am
      Originally Posted by Jason Kanigan View Post

      You are looking for people who know they need a website...not trying to convince people who don't have a website that they need one.

      If a person says "Nahh, I have all the clients i need, I don't need a website," unless you're a skilled salesperson, say "OK, thanks," hang up and move on. Faster & better for you.

      You are qualifying here. "Everybody" is not your customer.

      This makes some sense to me on one level. But how many people that outright say no, could be persuaded to say yes, after you tell them what they are missing out on, and the value a website holds.

      Surely if you qualify from the start and someone says no, you should try atleast to convince them and persuade them to another viewpoint by asking the right questions, ect?, instead of just putting down the phone and moving onto someone else.
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      • Profile picture of the author Jason Kanigan
        Originally Posted by Sonny Am View Post

        This makes some sense to me on one level. But how many people that outright say no, could be persuaded to say yes, after you tell them what they are missing out on, and the value a website holds.

        Surely if you qualify from the start and someone says no, you should try atleast to convince them and persuade them to another viewpoint by asking the right questions, ect?, instead of just putting down the phone and moving onto someone else.
        For a newbie to calling, NO, DO NOT ATTEMPT to persuade someone to change their point of view. This is the easiest way to get hurt, frustrated and shut yourself down.

        Quickly move on to your next call and opportunity to discover an individual who was sitting around wishing someone like you would call.
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        • Profile picture of the author Sonny Am
          Originally Posted by Jason Kanigan View Post

          For a newbie to calling, NO, DO NOT ATTEMPT to persuade someone to change their point of view. This is the easiest way to get hurt, frustrated and shut yourself down.

          Quickly move on to your next call and opportunity to discover an individual who was sitting around wishing someone like you would call.
          Thank you for the advice. Obviously you have vastly more experience than me on the subject of calling and sales, it was just that I thought persuasion was at the heart of the selling process (obviously persuading when there is a match between the prospects needs and what you are offering), and thought by just moving on and focusing on people that are "wishing" someone offering my service would call, id be leaving a lot of money on the table.

          How would you ever get better at persuasion if you dont try it at some point? Or are you proposing that a newbie waits 6 months or so, in which time he/she gets some experience of communicating, listening and asking questions under his belt and gets a firm understanding of the whole process before he/she engages in trying the art of persuasion?
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          • Profile picture of the author kenmichaels
            Originally Posted by Sonny Am View Post

            Thank you for the advice. Obviously you have vastly more experience than me on the subject of calling and sales, it was just that I thought persuasion was at the heart of the selling process (obviously persuading when there is a match between the prospects needs and what you are offering), and thought by just moving on and focusing on people that are "wishing" someone offering my service would call, id be leaving a lot of money on the table.

            How would you ever get better at persuasion if you dont try it at some point? Or are you proposing that a newbie waits 6 months or so, in which time he/she gets some experience of communicating, listening and asking questions under his belt and gets a firm understanding of the whole process before he/she engages in trying the art of persuasion?

            There are lay down seekers and then there are sales people.

            and then there are lay down seekers who will eventually become sales people.

            If you feel you need to rebut.. then rebut.. and rebut.. and rebut some more

            worst that will happen is you don't get the sale.

            Eventually you will get it right. And then the world is you oyster.

            there is nothing wrong with trying. IMHO, you sound
            as if you are on the right path... good luck.
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            • Profile picture of the author PeacefulCalamity
              Originally Posted by kenmichaels View Post

              There are lay down seekers and then there are sales people.

              and then there are lay down seekers who will eventually become sales people.

              If you feel you need to rebut.. then rebut.. and rebut.. and rebut some more

              worst that will happen is you don't get the sale.

              Eventually you will get it right. And then the world is you oyster.

              there is nothing wrong with trying. IMHO, you sound
              as if you are on the right path... good luck.
              Ken, to this day, would you say you're comfortable "rebutting" your way into a sale?

              I always figure that it's not a battle worth fighting, since they don't see the value in your services to begin.

              At the same time, I figure it's a trait worth learning in order to become a "good" seller.
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              The very existence of flame-throwers proves that some time, somewhere, someone said to themselves, "you know, I want to set those people over there on fire, but I'm just not close enough to get the job done."

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              • Profile picture of the author iAmNameLess
                Originally Posted by PeacefulCalamity View Post

                Ken, to this day, would you say you're comfortable "rebutting" your way into a sale?

                I always figure that it's not a battle worth fighting, since they don't see the value in your services to begin.

                At the same time, I figure it's a trait worth learning in order to become a "good" seller.
                IMO there are "sell me" objections, and then there are those that object simply because they aren't qualified anyway.
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              • Profile picture of the author kenmichaels
                Originally Posted by PeacefulCalamity View Post

                Ken, to this day, would you say you're comfortable "rebutting" your way into a sale?

                I always figure that it's not a battle worth fighting, since they don't see the value in your services to begin.

                At the same time, I figure it's a trait worth learning in order to become a "good" seller.
                Absolutely ... yes.
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          • Profile picture of the author Claude Whitacre
            Originally Posted by Sonny Am View Post

            How would you ever get better at persuasion if you dont try it at some point? Or are you proposing that a newbie waits 6 months or so, in which time he/she gets some experience of communicating, listening and asking questions under his belt and gets a firm understanding of the whole process before he/she engages in trying the art of persuasion?
            When you are beginning to learn sales, you just want the easy sales, because you don't know how to efficiently convince the un-convinced to make it worth your time.

            As you get better at selling, you'll see how to recognize the difference between a real question that needs answered, and an objection that is just a stall.

            But until you have developed some expertise, it's simply faster to sort than to convince. Meaning you'll get sales faster.

            In my speeches I say that in every town there are between 10 and 100 people that already want to buy what you are selling. You just need to find them.

            Kanigan was dead on when he told you that trying to convince people while you are cold calling is highly frustrating and will quickly lead to an overwhelming desire to quit.

            Here is the way I look at it, after a few decades of selling.
            If you have a huge number of people to call, and you are cold calling by phone, you'll get faster sales by just running as quickly as you can through the numbers. And if you get an objection in the first phone call, most people are wasting time by trying to convince.

            Again, Jason Kanigan has information on the precise best way to approach, qualify, and sell over the phone I've ever seen..Debates are pointless when there are real answers so close. His approach has real selling in it, while you are running through the number as quick as you can.

            The single best phone sales call I ever got was several years ago. A man called my at my business and said "I have long distance at 4 cents a minute. Want to hear more?" I swear, that's all he said.

            I was sort of in shock, and said "Sure". Later, I wondered how many people he went through to get to me? Let's say it was 100 and it took three hours. I know he made a few hundred dollars off the sale.

            And if I would have said "No"? No rejection, because I didn't know his name. There was no feeling of loss. no wasted time. That's the power of calling-qualifying-and sorting.

            Actually selling while cold calling takes training, and is not for the timid.

            After thirty years of face to face selling, I still take rejection personally.
            It's simply the way our brains are wired. Because selling is more personal, sorting is not.

            I hope this helps.
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  • Profile picture of the author Mike Anthony
    I agree with Claude. I think you are pitching the wrong thing. I would hate to be selling website design in today's market, Business owners don't give a rip about owning a website. What they care about is making money and thats a matter of traffic. So although you offer design you should be selling the idea of customers.

    Tell any business owner he can get 100-200 extra people looking at his product or service every day and every last owner would be interested. You have to build that angle into what you offer by way of design.
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    • Profile picture of the author Claude Whitacre
      Both Jason and I are correct.

      I'm much more salesy than most internet guys.
      So my impulse is to fit what I do to what they want. And show how they match.
      And most of my prospecting is still in person and speaking from a stage. The first post didn't say how the leads were contacted. And I (maybe incorrectly) assumed he was getting these objections after an actual pitch.

      But the fastest way, if you are cold calling, is to sort them fast into "interested" and "not interested". One product, one offer, and plow through the calls.

      If you are cold calling on the phone, educating is the last thing you want to do. "Convincing" is a waste of time. Jason Kanigan has a lot of material that can give you better advice on this.
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  • Profile picture of the author misterme
    Originally Posted by RyanLester View Post

    I astounded at the responses I get
    They sound like typical reflex stalls to me.

    So it's not about "educating" anyone. It's about bypassing their reflex stalls.
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  • Profile picture of the author bob ross
    Jason is right on. There are laydowns all over the place if you just make enough calls. There's business owners out there right now that want a website made for their business but want an expert to do it for them. You just have to call enough people to reach them.
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  • Profile picture of the author iAmNameLess
    Are you in the business of education? Cool... then start a course. If not, then you're in the business of sales, and you need sales. I personally don't want to take time to educate everyone I talk to, I'd rather spend time on the people I can help, without fighting a battle.
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  • Profile picture of the author EnzoBlaque
    Originally Posted by RyanLester View Post


    EDUCATION.

    Business owners need to be educated. Period.

    So, build relationships, and educate.

    It's a brand new day.
    Most business owners are prone to ANYTHING that guarantees to 'make them MORE money'. It is as simple as that.

    If you approach me and leave me with the impression that:

    1. My association with you and you company will INCREASE my profits
    2. You have a track record of success
    3. WHATEVER service you bring to the table will affect my company in a positive manner

    Then I am SOLD!.. Selling is as simple as those 3 things above. Forget everything else.

    If you nail down those three points above, then your prospects wont shun you with pathetic excuses like "it's winter now, we don't need a website".. Nail down these three points and you'll surely begin to convert an excessive amount of Leads.

    Enzo
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    • Profile picture of the author iAmNameLess
      Originally Posted by EnzoBlaque View Post


      If you nail down those three points above, then your prospects wont shun you with pathetic excuses like "it's winter now, we don't need a website".. Nail down these three points and you'll surely begin to convert an excessive amount of Leads.

      Enzo
      All a matter of perception too... It's winter now... You NEED a website more than you did before..
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      • Profile picture of the author Irish Intuition
        Most service businesses batten down the hatches when Frosty
        comes to town... ugh. I can't tell you how many "you need to do
        MORE when its slow" talks I've had.

        It's like watching bears march in a line straight into a cave for
        a seasonal slumber..
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        • Profile picture of the author Rus Sells
          I just got that excuse from a roofer client of mine. I was floored because having been a roofer for over 2 decades I never closed my doors during winter.

          These are just excuses! Roofers in Canada roof year round because they have families to feed and bills to pay!

          What planet are you living on pal, seriously!



          Originally Posted by Irish Intuition View Post

          Most service businesses batten down the hatches when Frosty
          comes to town... ugh. I can't tell you how many "you need to do
          MORE when its slow" talks I've had.

          It's like watching bears march in a line straight into a cave for
          a seasonal slumber..
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      • Profile picture of the author RyanLester
        Originally Posted by iAmNameLess View Post

        All a matter of perception too... It's winter now... You NEED a website more than you did before..
        Thank You!
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  • Profile picture of the author zylun
    Perhaps there are still lot of small business that are not well educated why they should have a website and the benefits behind it, but I think it vary from what state you are calling. But over all the answers of 1 & 2 are the most common.
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