Walking In Cold - First 138 Doors

21 replies
With all the great threads on cold calling over the phone, I thought I'd make a thread about my experience walking in cold in person.

I am not selling offline services. I am selling uniform rental programs.

Here are the results.

My guys have sold 3 deals with an annual revenue value of $5200 that are contracted for 5 years. We have 3 or 4 really great leads to be worked that could double the revenue value.

I simply walked in, introduced myself and what I do. Nothing special. They then tell me from there if they are a prospect.

From what I gather, these prospects take me at my word at I am an expert. No, I don't tell them I am.

The majority of the calls I make, I speak with the decision maker. I get a ton more info in person than on the phone.

I walk into 2 man greasy auto shops, up to Tier 1 national auto assembly plants. It all works no matter the size.

The key is volume. My goal is 100 doors a week; I would do more if this was my only gig. I know I can send 3-5 A leads to my salesmen with that kind of volume.

Only 1 out of the 140 calls I made was a douche. Everyone else was nice and sympathetic, short at worst.

Just do it guys. The money is out there. All you got to do is pick it up.
#138 #cold #doors #walking
  • Profile picture of the author Irish Intuition
    I find it is not just cold calling or pounding the pavement that
    unmotivates people. They really don't do anything but buy
    WSO's and sit on this forum all day looking for a magic
    lottery ticket.

    Most are too lazy. The illusion 'online marketing' has
    set up has a hangover most can't get past.

    I don't give a hoot how we are prospecting, it takes a
    lot of effort. Not only in initiating contact with potential
    clients, but sharpening our skill-sets.

    Effort seems to be the elephant in the room...
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    • Profile picture of the author ewenmack
      There are times where I get called in to review and fix
      the emails buyers of WSO's are told to send out.

      It's no wonder they get no or dismal results when they do implement!

      Best,
      Ewen

      Originally Posted by Irish Intuition View Post

      I find it is not just cold calling or pounding the pavement that
      unmotivates people. They really don't do anything but buy
      WSO's and sit on this forum all day looking for a magic
      lottery ticket.

      Most are too lazy. The illusion 'online marketing' has
      set up has a hangover most can't get past.

      I don't give a hoot how we are prospecting, it takes a
      lot of effort. Not only in initiating contact with potential
      clients, but sharpening our skill-sets.

      Effort seems to be the elephant in the room...
      {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7512165].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author Rearden
    95 percent of people suck at working hard. Always been that way.

    That is why income equality is a fleeting fantasy, imagined by the pikers and bureaucratic parasites of the world.
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    • Profile picture of the author sandalwood
      Originally Posted by Rearden View Post

      95 percent of people suck at working hard. Always been that way.

      That is why income equality is a fleeting fantasy, imagined by the pikers and bureaucratic parasites of the world.
      Rearden,

      James Carville, Democrat political consultant extraordinaire - and former Bill Clinton campaign manager, has astonishingly come out and said:

      "Ideologies aren't all that important. What's important is psychology.

      The Democratic constituency is just like a herd of cows. All you have to do is lay out enough silage and they come running. That's why I became an operative working with Democrats. With Democrats all you have to do is make a lot of noise, lay out the hay, and be ready to use the ole cattle prod in case a few want to bolt the herd.

      Eighty percent of the people who call themselves Democrats don't have a clue as to political reality. What amazes me is that you could take a group of people who are hard workers and convince them that they should support social programs that were the exact opposite of their own personal convictions. Put a little fear here and there and you can get people to vote any way you want.

      The voter is basically dumb and lazy. The reason I became a Democratic operative instead of a Republican was because there were more Democrats that didn't have a clue than there were Republicans.

      Truth is relative. Truth is what you can make the voter believe is the truth. If you're smart enough, truth is what you make the voter think it is. That's why I'm a Democrat. I can make the Democratic voters think whatever I want them to."

      The source is his book recently published. Pay attention to para 3 above, it is important. Look up Ivey Lee and you'll get the names of early propagandists who espoused this same line in the early 1900's. Nothing has changed in over 100 years. The puppet masters pull the strings and the toads jump.

      Oh well, what the hell. Just keep trucking.

      Tom
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      • Profile picture of the author Marvin Johnston
        Originally Posted by sandalwood View Post

        Rearden,

        James Carville, Democrat political consultant extraordinaire - and former Bill Clinton campaign manager, has astonishingly come out and said:

        "Ideologies aren't all that important. What's important is psychology.
        A bit OT, but according to Snopes (which I dislike for a lot of reasons), that quote was something made up by someone and never said by Carville.

        @Reardon, thanks for posting your results. Nothing like face to face selling, scary as it may seem .

        Marvin
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  • Profile picture of the author Rearden
    Keep trucking? Go Galt!

    Machiavelli (sp) is what comes to mind.

    Always had a sense that Carville had intellect.
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  • Profile picture of the author chadbmmo
    Originally Posted by Rearden View Post

    With all the great threads on cold calling over the phone, I thought I'd make a thread about my experience walking in cold in person.

    I am not selling offline services. I am selling uniform rental programs.

    Here are the results.

    My guys have sold 3 deals with an annual revenue value of $5200 that are contracted for 5 years. We have 3 or 4 really great leads to be worked that could double the revenue value.

    I simply walked in, introduced myself and what I do. Nothing special. They then tell me from there if they are a prospect.

    From what I gather, these prospects take me at my word at I am an expert. No, I don't tell them I am.

    The majority of the calls I make, I speak with the decision maker. I get a ton more info in person than on the phone.

    I walk into 2 man greasy auto shops, up to Tier 1 national auto assembly plants. It all works no matter the size.

    The key is volume. My goal is 100 doors a week; I would do more if this was my only gig. I know I can send 3-5 A leads to my salesmen with that kind of volume.

    Only 1 out of the 140 calls I made was a douche. Everyone else was nice and sympathetic, short at worst.

    Just do it guys. The money is out there. All you got to do is pick it up.

    The one thing about walking in from a sales aspect.... is it is a lot harder for the customer to say no to your face... so this is the biggest hook to the walk in method.... good for u
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    • Profile picture of the author kenmichaels
      Originally Posted by chadbmmo View Post

      The one thing about walking in from a sales aspect.... is it is a lot harder for the customer to say no to your face... so this is the biggest hook to the walk in method.... good for u
      no it is not.

      thats a rookie statement.
      Not made by some one in the trenches with experience.


      Originally Posted by Rearden View Post

      Cold calling businesses is so much easier than cold calling residences.
      I hear that a lot. I must be the odd duck, because i prefer to call B2C over B2B

      any day, any product.

      Not that i am doing that nowadays
      But i have always preferred it.

      You go Rearden, looks like the wind is finally in your sail bro
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  • Profile picture of the author Alice grubb
    100% of the people you don't call will not convert.
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  • Profile picture of the author ambrking
    IF you do not pick up that phone, you won't get that sales call. Hardwork pays off, you just need to get off that couch.
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  • Profile picture of the author Rearden
    Finished up with another 74 cold knocks this week.

    My salesmen closed another lead I sent them.

    I tailed the truck of weak competitor in the area to create a list of his accounts that my guys will call on next week (now there's targeted marketing).

    Another salesman has verbal agreements on two accounts to sign in January -- another $5200 annualized revenue contracted for 5 years.

    Got a tremendous amount of names, bid dates coinciding with current vendor contracts ending, handshakes with decision makers, and information on competitors in the area that phoning would never yield.

    The one thing I've found surprising is how much easier it is to door-knock businesses cold than door-knock residential with a lead card they mailed requesting for information. No dogs, roaches crawling the ceiling, or crazy people to worry about.

    You web design guys peeing your pants about phoning for new business need to listen to me and walk in cold and introduce yourself and what you have to offer.

    I promise you, unless you're a total goober living out your life in your mother's basement, the decision maker (who's probably a salesman for his business himself) will respect your initiative, and unconsciously register you as the expert on web design. All because you showed up, made eye contact, shook hands, and introduced yourself.
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    • Profile picture of the author Claude Whitacre
      Originally Posted by Rearden View Post


      I tailed the truck of weak competitor in the area to create a list of his accounts that my guys will call on next week (now there's targeted marketing).

      Got a tremendous amount of names, bid dates coinciding with current vendor contracts ending, handshakes with decision makers, and information on competitors in the area that phoning would never yield.

      The one thing I've found surprising is how much easier it is to door-knock businesses cold than door-knock residential with a lead card they mailed requesting for information. No dogs, roaches crawling the ceiling, or crazy people to worry about.

      You web design guys peeing your pants about phoning for new business need to listen to me and walk in cold and introduce yourself and what you have to offer.

      I promise you, unless you're a total goober living out your life in your mother's basement, the decision maker (who's probably a salesman for his business himself) will respect your initiative, and unconsciously register you as the expert on web design. All because you showed up, made eye contact, shook hands, and introduced yourself.
      Reardon;

      1) You followed a weak competitor? You sneaky little devil, you!

      2) The people you shook hands with are not lost. By going back a few times, you will pick them up.

      My lawyer kept giving us One Giant Grapefruit...once a year, every year. I hate lawyers. But her? Three grapefruits in, and she's my lawyer.

      If it was me, I'd ask the people you sell if they know who else has their service with your competitor. These people will know who the referrer is, will talk to you, and probably buy. After all, they bought from your weaker competitor, didn't they?

      Good stuff.
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    • Profile picture of the author Jay Rhome
      Originally Posted by Rearden View Post

      Got a tremendous amount of names, bid dates coinciding with current vendor contracts ending, handshakes with decision makers, and information on competitors in the area that phoning would never yield.

      The one thing I've found surprising is how much easier it is to door-knock businesses cold than door-knock residential with a lead card they mailed requesting for information. No dogs, roaches crawling the ceiling, or crazy people to worry about.

      You web design guys peeing your pants about phoning for new business need to listen to me and walk in cold and introduce yourself and what you have to offer.

      I promise you, unless you're a total goober living out your life in your mother's basement, the decision maker (who's probably a salesman for his business himself) will respect your initiative, and unconsciously register you as the expert on web design. All because you showed up, made eye contact, shook hands, and introduced yourself.
      I too find it is much easier in person, and you get to see/hear/pick things you could never have over the phone. I've had people even refer others to me without me asking for it, on the first meet! But the volume of people seen is much lower, and well, I live in a cold cold area, with snow and all, so I have to find other ways when weather gets in the way.

      And to be honest, by myself, I don't do much of it and the doubts creep in and all that . When I'm training somebody though, it's almost effortless. So I guess I'll be hiring reps as soon as January 3rd 2013 hits. Even it's to get MY butt moving .
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      • Profile picture of the author midasman09
        Banned
        My very first business was "Burglar Alarms for small biz" in the North Shore of Chgo (Evanston, IL) I was "hired" on a Straight Commission" meaning, I wasn't paid unless I SOLD something.

        So...the other 2 sales people made phone calls and made 2 sales a week. I went Door-To-Door and made 2 sales a DAY!

        So...that convinced me of "Walk-In" sales. And, after building my Alarm biz up to 17 employees....I sold it and semi-retired 8 yrs later. However, I could not just lay around. So...since 1982 I've created a whole bunch of business programs and almost every one had to do with Face-To-Face sales.

        Give me a "Pitch" book and Order Form and I'll bring in Cash...every day.

        Ohhh....my latest; "Videos On Spec";

        A few yrs ago I saw a "Portable DVD Player" for $80 at Wally World. Got home....made a Video of some photos I had taken of the Interior of a restaurant I had taken for an Ad Project (with Photo Story 3) Burned a DVD and put it into my new Portable DVD Player and WHALA!....another "Low-Investment, Quick-Cash" project was born.

        So....next morning I went to a restaurant...found the owner....set the Player on his bar and showed him the DVD I had created.....told him I'd like to make a "Demo" for his restaurant at NO obligation....all I needed was his permission to take some photos with my Digital....which he gladly gave.

        Went home and made a Video (with PS3) using appropriate background music (It was a Mexican place)

        Burned a DVD and went back to show the owner. He LOVED it! Gave me a check and told me to "make Videos of his other 2 restaurants".

        I then proceeded to get a few more restaurants, using the first 3 restaurants as Demos.

        I then got involved with helping one of my sons in his business and....I now have the TIME to get back to the "Videos On Spec" project.

        This....in 2013, I'm going to be doing "Videos-On-Spec" for ALL types of businesses AND....setting up a "Video Directory" for each of the towns near me.

        These are "2 min" Videos I call, "PRE-VUE VIDEOS"! I'll be setting up a "Video Directory" of "PreVue" videos that will be listed in alphabetical order by Category (Accountants, Attorneys, Auto Repair....Restaurants (by Food Category) BBQ, Chinese, Italian, Mexican...etc)

        Because I will be promoting my "Town PreVue Video Directory" I will be charging a hefty monthly fee to bring in Residuals (Sell 'Em Once - Collect Forever) so that once I reach my goal I can sit back and eat my Stash of Twinkies....in my PJ's and Slippers.

        Don Alm....looking to save on "Shoe Leather" in 2013
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      • Originally Posted by Jay Rhome View Post

        I too find it is much easier in person, and you get to see/hear/pick things you could never have over the phone. I've had people even refer others to me without me asking for it, on the first meet!
        Right on--you can see if they are expanding, how many people are in the parking lot, what kinds of customers are coming in, etc.

        I think more people would do cold walking if they reframed it in their mind. Think of it as meeting fellow business owners to discuss business ideas and strategy. Have fun with it. Yes, there will be some sourheads, but they are a minority; just keep moving. It's all about confidence.
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  • Profile picture of the author Rearden
    Yep -- I'm starting to do that.

    It especially works in the smaller, outlying communities.

    My salesman got a contact for a paving company on a lead I sent him that he just closed.

    A lot of these people know each other, and, especially when they're fed up with their current vendor and you're selling them the solution, they will gladly refer and drop names of people to see.

    Thanks!
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  • Profile picture of the author aduttonater
    Just walk into as many businesses as you can and make sure you have plenty of business cards. If you know how to explain your services and how it will benefit their business in the long run, then you are now in the same ball field.
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  • Profile picture of the author Rearden
    Cold calling businesses is so much easier than cold calling residences.

    I closed 2 deals last week that originated on a cold walk call.

    The other 3 were from cold telemarketing calls.

    This stuff really works, guys. I used to be afraid to call Pizza Hut. It ain't as hard as you imagine it.
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