What should I answer when clients ask...

17 replies
Hello Warriors.

I'm providing new websites for local businesses.

One question I find hard to answer though, is: "why would I want a new website, my old one is already working for me".

I've already pointed out to the clients that their website is looking like something from the stoneage, that the coding used may be outdated and that they (IF they go on and pay for a new website) will easily be able to edit / add content to the site through the CMS system.

So my question to you is, what would you answer to such a question?
#answer #clients
  • Profile picture of the author sandalwood
    Originally Posted by Stig Killendahl View Post

    Hello Warriors.

    I'm providing new websites for local businesses.

    One question I find hard to answer though, is: "why would I want a new website, my old one is already working for me".

    I've already pointed out to the clients that their website is looking like something from the stoneage, that the coding used may be outdated and that they (IF they go on and pay for a new website) will easily be able to edit / add content to the site through the CMS system.

    So my question to you is, what would you answer to such a question?
    Stig,

    I hear this myself. I always say thank you and hang up. I do not feel the need to explain anything to someone who won't at least listen. In fact, let them keep their old website. They deserve it.

    To me it is far easier to make the next call and land a client w/o a website. Less stress, less headache and more money. But that's me. Others will take a different tact and keep at the guy w/the website.

    Here is the other side of the picture. I had 3 people this week tell me they had a website but weren't satisified with it. We meet with all three next week at our office. While that is a bit off point, isn't it far easier to deal w/this person than the "satisfied" one?

    Just my 2Ā¢...

    Tom
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  • Profile picture of the author Aaron Doud
    I think you may have learned something. Those with the oldest websites may be the hardest to sell on the idea of a new website.

    If you target people who actively update their website you will find those who put more value and thus investment into their website.
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    • Profile picture of the author Claude Whitacre
      If you are getting that response on the phone, I might give up and go to the next one.
      In person? I ask questions like ;
      "So what is your experience with your website?"
      "Who built it?"
      "How often does someone call you and say 'I found you on your website'?"

      I just want to know their experience with their website.

      Depending on what they say, I say "I'm glad you took that first step. Most of my clients have a website. In fact, it would be unusual if you didn't have one. Would you like to know where it shows up in a Google search?"
      Now, if it shows up on top, I say "Now you have one spot in the first ten. Would you like to have several spots? Would you like to push your competitors off the first page?"

      If it shows up in the middle, bottom, or not at all...
      "Ok, you have what most businesses have, a very nice website that isn't helping you when customers are looking for what you sell. Sometimes people hire me to revamp their website, but that's not what I recommend. I would suggest creating a second website for the purpose of ranking highly on Google. That way we could even link it to the website you already have, and raise it in the rankings. Does that make sense?"


      There are two highly educated schools of thought here.

      On the phone, speed is maybe better (although I absolutely no expert). So you just want the low hanging fruit.

      In person? Objections are very often weak and meaningless. And if I'm in selling mode....

      Whatever they are doing now, is simply the first half of whatever I would suggest.

      With that mindset, you can overcome many objections at the beginning.
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    • Profile picture of the author rodtyler
      Originally Posted by Aaron Doud View Post

      I think you may have learned something. Those with the oldest websites may be the hardest to sell on the idea of a new website.

      If you target people who actively update their website you will find those who put more value and thus investment into their website.
      Unfortunately, if they are actively updating their website, they probably don't NEED a new one.
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      • Profile picture of the author Aaron Doud
        Originally Posted by rodtyler View Post

        Unfortunately, if they are actively updating their website, they probably don't NEED a new one.
        That is wrong. We actively update our website but get a major refresh every year or two. Would you rather have a client like us or would you rather chase guys who will pay 1/10th of what we do 1/5th as often?

        Businesses that care about their web presense are your best customers. The guy with the geocities style website? Not so much.

        There are loads of good prospects out there but I think people ignore them to chase after the "easy" sales (when often they are actually the harder sales).
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        • Profile picture of the author rodtyler
          Originally Posted by Aaron Doud View Post

          That is wrong. We actively update our website but get a major refresh every year or two. Would you rather have a client like us or would you rather chase guys who will pay 1/10th of what we do 1/5th as often?

          Businesses that care about their web presense are your best customers. The guy with the geocities style website? Not so much.

          There are loads of good prospects out there but I think people ignore them to chase after the "easy" sales (when often they are actually the harder sales).
          I guess it depends on what is meant by "actively updating". When he mentioned actively updating, I assumed that to mean what it says. Maybe the business owner already has someone doing that for him.

          Even if he isn't actively updating, if he likely "believes" he is, I could spend days trying to convince him that I can do a better job. In that time, I could nail down 5-10 other, less "informed" clients that would be far less demanding. It has been my experience that these types of clients suck the life out of you, while the "easy" ones are thrilled by any improvement at all.
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  • Profile picture of the author PowerWealth247
    If their old one is already working I congratulate them and explain how a new, modern one would work even better. Not unlike how their last car worked fine but still they bought a newer one.
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  • Profile picture of the author exchanger107
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    • Profile picture of the author rodtyler
      Originally Posted by exchanger107 View Post

      U can provide them ur new websites features that r not in their past websites.
      They don't care about features. How will it make them more money? If you start with that, you will have their attention.
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  • Profile picture of the author hayfj2
    Ask them 4 questions....

    1. Are you satsified with the ROI you get from your current site?
    2. Are you satisfied with the Revenue you get from your current site?
    3. Are you satisfied with the level of qualified enquiries you get from your site?

    4. Do you know how much business your competitor XXXXXX is taking away from under your nose because of their page 1 listing, and how you're not appearing for the same terms?

    Hope that gets you thinking...

    Regards


    Fraser
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  • Profile picture of the author ewenmack
    A satisfied person isn't a prospect.

    You can turn this person into a prospect
    with this statement..."I'm pleased for you
    because this means you are getting 11 calls
    a week from your website like my client Bob,
    over at Big Bob's...you know him?

    Just drop short stories of others results.

    Leave them hanging.

    This creates tension within them.

    Always have little stories of results which
    are laden with numbers, contrast, money and time.

    This worked for a sports star agent.

    He had being trying to get a star to switch over to him.

    No luck.

    Had a chance meeting with him
    and the star said he was sticking with his existing agent
    because he was happy.

    Agent said " I'm pleased for you, must be a great feeling
    getting picked up and dropped off in a limo for each game."

    Star calls agent a few days later and signs up with him.

    See, this is the power of creating dissatisfaction in a already happy person.

    Best,
    Ewen

    Originally Posted by Stig Killendahl View Post

    Hello Warriors.

    I'm providing new websites for local businesses.

    One question I find hard to answer though, is: "why would I want a new website, my old one is already working for me".

    I've already pointed out to the clients that their website is looking like something from the stoneage, that the coding used may be outdated and that they (IF they go on and pay for a new website) will easily be able to edit / add content to the site through the CMS system.

    So my question to you is, what would you answer to such a question?
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  • Profile picture of the author Bayo
    Originally Posted by Stig Killendahl View Post

    ...I've already pointed out to the clients that their website is looking like something from the stoneage, that the coding used may be outdated and that they (IF they go on and pay for a new website) will easily be able to edit / add content to the site through the CMS system.

    So my question to you is, what would you answer to such a question?
    Well done for actually being out there. That's a lot more than many people would dare to do.

    I think the challenge is that you're telling them what you believe. They don't see their website as being outdated. So one thing you might want to do (among others), is find a way for them to own the reality / to state it, that their website is not helping them achieve the goals they originally had for it.

    If they didn't have any goals for their website then it's going to be hard to argue the case!

    Maybe the site just got built "just because" with no real intention.

    Also, when you're talking about coding you probably have lost them.

    Whichever way your discussions goes, I would recommend that your offering is tied in with some desire they have for their business that isn't being achieved.

    That's a quick piece of feedback in the interim and I hope it helps you find a resolution.

    BAYO
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  • Profile picture of the author helisell
    This is what you need to do.

    Say "Great I'm glad to hear you have a site at least 'cos that puts you ahead of the game....can I just ask........How big a revenue stream is your website for you at the moment in percentage terms?"
    You respond "Oh right.....ok.....and" (or similar)
    "Has that been getting better or worse of late?"
    You respond "Oh right.....ok.....and" (or similar)
    "How often is your site updated to keep it ranking well?"
    You respond "Oh right.....ok.....and" (or similar)
    "Are you able to do that yourself or do you pay to have that done?"
    You respond "Oh right.....ok.....and" (or similar)
    "Do you have your site engaging with the various social media sites to get more traffic?"
    You respond "Oh right.....ok.....and" (or similar)
    "When did you first get your site set up?"
    You respond "Oh right.....ok.....and" (or similar)
    "Are you aware of the big results that people in your industry are getting just by changing things a little?"
    You respond "Oh right.....ok.....and" (or similar)
    "If I could show you a very cost effective way to get some dramatic improvements and generate even more from your site would you be open to discussing some new ideas?"
    You respond "Oh right.....ok.....and" (or similar)
    "How soon would you want to look at that?"

    Obviously it will have to be conversational and a little tip.....forget you're trying to sell an appointment/site etc and just be genuinely interested in trying to help them.

    The psychology of what is happening here should be obvious....you are showing them that you are a total expert....not by what you 'tell them'....but by what you 'ask them'

    Good luck
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    Making Calls To Sell Something? What are you actually saying?
    Is there any room for improvement? Want to find out?

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  • Profile picture of the author SparkletMedia
    Banned
    I prefer to get them to fill out a survey, and then send it back to me. That way I exactly know what they want, and what I can offer them.
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  • Profile picture of the author SashaLee
    Well, one thing our clients report to us is that they're literally sick of the calls that start with:

    We provide new websites
    We provide upgraded sites
    We can get you on Page 1 of google
    We work with you to get you on Page 1

    etc, etc.

    We got about 50 (of our 134) clients by developing a similar site to theirs, getting it ranked very high (sometimes higher than their site) and then providing a limited number of free leads (usually about 10) to the prospective client. We track the results and when we approach the client (usually on the phone as they're overseas from us) we tell them, "Google <the phrase/word they rank highest for>". They instantly see the site we've developed and we tell them who we've referred to them in the last week or so. We talk about the results with those clients.

    We then tell them we're turning the lead-flow off, unless they want to own or rent the new site (and subsequent second listing on Page 1) and get all the leads themselves.

    It's a no-brainer. We provide a results-first option for them. They're always interested.

    Try that approach. You'll find there's no haggling over price, there's no pushback and you're suddenly the hero. Anything you propose to them in the future they'll listen to, and usually go for as you're a proven results-getter as opposed to a promiser.

    Hope that helps,

    Sash...
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  • Profile picture of the author Jason Kanigan
    "Maybe you shouldn't. Maybe you don't need one."

    Check the look on their face.

    "Can I ask how it's doing now? About how many leads a day are you getting from it?"

    "How are those coming in...phone, email, form?"

    And you can continue with diagnostic questions...could their staff be busier (responding to more inquiries), why are they happy with that number of inbound leads, if they could magically change their website and turn it into the perfect thing, what would that look like? How would it work? What would the effect on their business be?

    So are they still happy with their old site?
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    • Profile picture of the author Stig Killendahl
      @sandalwood

      Thank you Tom, selling a website to people who doesn't listen is in fact very frustrating. I might be putting too much work into those people!

      @Aaron Doud

      Thank you Aaron. Again, I might be putting too much work into the people. I'll take your advice and try it out, I've always been targeting people with really old and crappy websites.

      @Claude Whitacre
      Thank you Claude! I like the idea of trying to sell them SEO instead, very nice twist!
      - Sadly I haven't had the courage to go into SEO yet, though I know I'm missing out on a lot of profit. My problem is that, what if I can't rank their website? What if it takes me months to rank it? People will become impatient and probably want their money back if they see no results. And what if I rank them, and they see no results at all?

      @PowerWealth247
      I like your comparison with the car! Just what the "older" people want to hear. Thank you PowerWealth!

      @rodtyler
      This is indeed a question I find hard to answer. I can't guarantee any profit from their new website.

      @hayfj2
      Thanks Fraser. 4 really great questions!

      But, how will my new design increase their RIO and revenue that they get from the site? I imagine I'll get this question a lot.

      And as I mentioned earlier, I haven't jumped into SEO yet, even though I'm probably loosing a lot of profit. My problem is that, what if I can't rank their website? What if it takes me months to rank it? People will become impatient and probably want their money back if they see no results. And what if I rank them, and they see no results at all?

      @ewenmack
      Great twist Ewen! I like your idea. Thanks

      @Bayo
      Thanks Bayo!

      You're right, I might be focusing too much on what I belive. And I might be loosing them on the coding part. Thank you for your advice!

      @helisell
      Thank you! I'll try to follow your advice

      @SparkletMedia
      Good idea, however I meet this question before securing the client. It seems to be their way of "getting rid of me".

      @SashaLee
      Wow! This is really turning everything around! But it seems to be a lot of work if they decline? However I'll take your idea into consideration, thank you Sash.

      @Jason Kanigan
      Thank you Jason, just the type of questions need!
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      • Profile picture of the author rodtyler
        Originally Posted by Stig Killendahl View Post

        @rodtyler
        This is indeed a question I find hard to answer. I can't guarantee any profit from their new website.
        Nor should you try. The trick is putting the right spin on what you are trying to sell them. Their site may look like it was designed by Fred Flintstone, but as long as it's getting results, who cares? Your job is to show them how a new site CAN bring much better results.

        This applies to whatever you are selling. IM gurus have been harping on this for years. Sell the benefits, not the features. The same rule applies in the offline world.
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