Dear Offline Bizzers... Can you provide rough figures on how much revenue you generate per year?

23 replies
Hi Guys,

I think we always hear the stories of somebody meeting a client and walking away with a 2gran paycheck and other similar stories.

That is great and very inspiring to say the least and it would be great to know what people are making overall per year if you can share?

This is specifically for the full timers who may have had to quit their day jobs to focus on this, or didn't have a job to begin with and just launched into it full time.

I am seriously considering quitting my well paying job to work for myself and do this full time. It will be great to know what is possible and hear some of the long term success stories.

Many Thanks,
#bizzers #dear #figures #generate #offline #provide #revenue #rough #year
  • Profile picture of the author Claude Whitacre
    I have been speaking and selling offline services for about 3 years now. this is all very part time. I run a full time retail store too. Last year my billings were a tad over $200,000 from selling local online services.

    Had I been doing it full time, it would have been a million.

    But....
    I speak to groups to sell. It's not the way most people would do this.

    In 2013 it will be a little less, because I'm devoting myself to writing and speaking. That doesn't mean I'm making less money, it means I'm making less at this one activity and more at others.

    And, I'm not selling my services cheap. I have one package. They buy or don't.

    Normally, telling people how much money you take in is a mistake. But nobody here is a client, and the figures are real.

    My advice, as strongly as I can put it, is to not give up your job, until you have a steady stream of monthly income from selling your services. You have an entirely different...and sale killing...vibe , when you have to make a sale.
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    • Profile picture of the author boatree
      Thanks Claude.

      So to clarify, you have generated 200K in billings (most of which will be profit?) doing this part time? That is very impressive!

      When you mention you speak to large groups, are you referring to holding monthly small business owner seminars?

      Also do you mind sharing what the one package is that you sell (to give me ideas)?

      Finally, thanks for your advice re not quitting my full time job to do this.

      I've simply lost the passion with my current job, I don't really enjoy the work environment nor am I a fan of working hard to make somebody else rich.

      I would much rather build my own business and know all of the hard work is ultimately going to reward my own back pocket. Some people will call me crazy for wanting to leave a 5-6 figure income (fluctuates based on commission) to do this but it just feels like the right thing to do.

      I am also aligning this so I have a years worth of funds to carry me for 12 months. That way I can give this a proper shot and know it will kill off any "I am desperate" to make a sale vibe as a result. I completely understand what you mean though about being desperate and not making sales as a result. I've been there early in my career.

      Thankfully I have worked as a BDM for the last 6 years, and needed to cold call businesses and do meetings etc. It almost seems like a perfect set of skills for this business model!

      I will be putting myself into a little bit of debt to support myself for a year without a salary/commissions - about 30K worth to be precise, but hearing figures like yours, it's really encouraging to know that if I make the calls and it should all work out.

      Prior to leaving my job, I will be mapping out a prospects list comprising of a few hundred different clients in different niches. That way there will be no down time on day 1, and I will be able to hit the phones straight away and book meetings.

      It's a big decision for me and I haven't been able to sleep properly the last week or so feeling mixed emotions.

      Ultimately though, my gut feeling is telling me it is the right thing to do and I believe it will all work out.


      Originally Posted by Claude Whitacre View Post

      I have been speaking and selling offline services for about 3 years now. this is all very part time. I run a full time retail store too. Last year my billings were a tad over $200,000 from selling local online services.

      Had I been doing it full time, it would have been a million.

      But....
      I speak to groups to sell. It's not the way most people would do this.

      In 2013 it will be a little less, because I'm devoting myself to writing and speaking. That doesn't mean I'm making less money, it means I'm making less at this one activity and more at others.

      And, I'm not selling my services cheap. I have one package. They buy or don't.

      Normally, telling people how much money you take in is a mistake. But nobody here is a client, and the figures are real.

      My advice, as strongly as I can put it, is to not give up your job, until you have a steady stream of monthly income from selling your services. You have an entirely different...and sale killing...vibe , when you have to make a sale.
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      • Profile picture of the author AndrewCavanagh
        There's really nothing stopping you from talking to
        business owners right now.

        You don't have to quit your job to do that.

        Business owners will see you after hours, before they
        open or talk to you on the phone, or exchange emails
        with you.

        The best thing you can do is just get started.

        The money is there for those who work.

        Kindest regards,
        Andrew Cavanagh
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        • Profile picture of the author goblue1918
          I agree with Claude. You will be a different seller if you are needy and desperate.

          Take the list of prospects and start contacting them now. Do it on your lunch hour, before and after work, or take vacation days. Don't forget about Saturday mornings. I have had good luck meeting with potential clients at this time. It can be a slower time for the business owner to allow him to catch up. Not as hectic.

          I work full time and that is what I do.

          Also, while you are selling your services you may discover you have to sell a different service/product - it might be more profitable or better serve your area. After a number of calls or visits, you will know what the business owners need.

          See what works for you.
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          • Profile picture of the author boatree
            Ok guys, I will build the prospect list and start making the calls at lunch time and on Saturdays.

            Thanks for the feedback.
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      • Profile picture of the author Claude Whitacre
        Originally Posted by boatree View Post

        Thanks Claude.

        So to clarify, you have generated 200K in billings (most of which will be profit?) doing this part time? That is very impressive!

        When you mention you speak to large groups, are you referring to holding monthly small business owner seminars?

        Also do you mind sharing what the one package is that you sell (to give me ideas)?

        I am also aligning this so I have a years worth of funds to carry me for 12 months. That way I can give this a proper shot and know it will kill off any "I am desperate" to make a sale vibe as a result. I completely understand what you mean though about being desperate and not making sales as a result. I've been there early in my career.

        Thankfully I have worked as a BDM for the last 6 years, and needed to cold call businesses and do meetings etc. It almost seems like a perfect set of skills for this business model!

        I will be putting myself into a little bit of debt to support myself for a year without a salary/commissions - about 30K worth to be precise, but hearing figures like yours, it's really encouraging to know that if I make the calls and it should all work out.
        A few things; Last year I spoke to 8 groups. I also sold one on one. The groups I sold to varied from 30 to 300 people. All events were hosted by someone else, and I just spoke at their event. No monthly small business owner seminars. Just stand alone events. How to get booked for these events is a completely different subject, and a whole skill set to learn.

        Having savings to pay yourself for a year is admirable.

        I have to tell you; My sales are a result of a few years of speaking experience and a ton of one on one selling experience. I then studied several speakers that sold large packages from the stage. What I do isn't impressive at all if you would see all the effort that went into learning how to sell. I've also written a few books that help me position myself as an expert. I'm just letting you know, it ain't easy.

        Here is the link to a video of me giving my presentation, including what I sell.
        My package costs $6,400 for the first year, and $199 a month after. About 10% of the audience typically buys.
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        What if they're not stars? What if they are holes poked in the top of a container so we can breath?
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  • Profile picture of the author sebski22
    Just put in my point. I left my 9-5 6 months ago to pursue my dream of owning my own biz. Your situation sounds very similar to mine, I have been a pretty successful salesperson over the past 6yrs and was earning a good living. However like you I thought there was something more inside me.

    The past 6 months have been an eye opener, I have 6 clients at the moment and this is just meeting my living expenses nothing more. I think I will make roughly 20k profit in my 1st 12 months , which is a considerable drop in wages for me.

    But it's not all about the money, I have learnt a lot about myself in the past 6 months and I love living life on my terms. So I personally feel far richer now than I ever did slugging away earning dollar for someone else.

    The biggest hurdle I have discovered is that I am far more comfortable selling someone else's products/services than my own. When I get a no for my business I take it personally, which has really held me back from pushing to the next level. I know what I need to go, I know how to do it but I still need to overcome my irrational fear of personal rejection.

    So as a small word of warning, be aware that selling yourself is far more difficult than selling a 3rd party product!
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    • Profile picture of the author boatree
      Hey Sebski,

      Thanks for your comments. Our situations indeed sound familiar!

      Is there a way I can contact you outside of here, perhaps through facebook so we can have a longer conversation/

      Thanks,

      Originally Posted by sebski22 View Post

      Just put in my point. I left my 9-5 6 months ago to pursue my dream of owning my own biz. Your situation sounds very similar to mine, I have been a pretty successful salesperson over the past 6yrs and was earning a good living. However like you I thought there was something more inside me.

      The past 6 months have been an eye opener, I have 6 clients at the moment and this is just meeting my living expenses nothing more. I think I will make roughly 20k profit in my 1st 12 months , which is a considerable drop in wages for me.

      But it's not all about the money, I have learnt a lot about myself in the past 6 months and I love living life on my terms. So I personally feel far richer now than I ever did slugging away earning dollar for someone else.

      The biggest hurdle I have discovered is that I am far more comfortable selling someone else's products/services than my own. When I get a no for my business I take it personally, which has really held me back from pushing to the next level. I know what I need to go, I know how to do it but I still need to overcome my irrational fear of personal rejection.

      So as a small word of warning, be aware that selling yourself is far more difficult than selling a 3rd party product!
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    • Profile picture of the author AndrewCavanagh
      Originally Posted by sebski22 View Post

      Just put in my point. I left my 9-5 6 months ago to pursue my dream of owning my own biz. Your situation sounds very similar to mine, I have been a pretty successful salesperson over the past 6yrs and was earning a good living. However like you I thought there was something more inside me.

      The past 6 months have been an eye opener, I have 6 clients at the moment and this is just meeting my living expenses nothing more. I think I will make roughly 20k profit in my 1st 12 months , which is a considerable drop in wages for me.

      But it's not all about the money, I have learnt a lot about myself in the past 6 months and I love living life on my terms. So I personally feel far richer now than I ever did slugging away earning dollar for someone else.

      The biggest hurdle I have discovered is that I am far more comfortable selling someone else's products/services than my own. When I get a no for my business I take it personally, which has really held me back from pushing to the next level. I know what I need to go, I know how to do it but I still need to overcome my irrational fear of personal rejection.

      So as a small word of warning, be aware that selling yourself is far more difficult than selling a 3rd party product!

      This is a really cool post.

      I would have 2 suggestions that may or may not be helpful:

      # 1: Charge more. Often if you have a reasonable number of
      clients and you're not making good money it's because you're simply
      not charging enough.

      # 2: Seriously consider finding some joint venture partners who sell
      services that you don't offer.

      Things like Facebook marketing, or Google Maps, marketing with
      online video or any kind of valuable add on service you might offer
      to your clients and prospects.

      Find joint venture partners who understand the cost of getting new
      clients and are willing to pay a good percentage of their fee to you
      for bringing them clients who are ready to go (think 50%+).

      If you're good at selling something for a third party you should be
      able to make some great profits going back to all the contacts you
      already have and sell them services provided by the joint venture
      partners you trust.

      Kindest regards,
      Andrew Cavanagh
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      • Profile picture of the author Marvin Johnston
        Originally Posted by AndrewCavanagh View Post

        # 1: Charge more. Often if you have a reasonable number of clients and you're not making good money it's because you're simply not charging enough.
        I couldn't agree more with this!

        In my first business, I basically (through ignorance ... what is marketing?) had pricing well below industry standards. My GM beat me to death into raising prices about 100%.

        Sure, we lost some customers ... for a week or two .

        That lesson learned!

        And I kept my job until it became unprofitable to stay there. But one thing that I did from my job was to develop a great network of people that provided a LOT of help as the business grew. And no, it was not a conflict of interest as we had two totally different markets.

        One other thing I did (I fell into a starving crowd, and I was good at what I did) was to have an unlisted business phone number to control growth. How many people would actually admit to that kind of nonsense .

        Marvin
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  • Profile picture of the author rbecklund
    Mine, might not be so uplifting and motivational - just realistic...

    I agree with not quitting your day job. I'm seeing it first hand, my partner quit her job over a year ago and is now looking for a job. I lost my job and had no other options but do this. I enjoy this, but living off cash flow like we do can be very stressful.

    While this can click for some people, I would hazard a guess that most people doing this are working FT, PT or struggling. There are people killing it and there are those that are killing it and selling products to newcomers (I'm always skeptical of those figures).

    While you're working you can do direct marketing, email marketing (targeted works best), PPC, etc. I cold call and I get frustrated because you kind of have to do it during 9-5 if you really want to get the volume of calls in.

    Also, there has to be something about this that you love. To me, just wanting your own business might not be enough. After 2 years of this full-time and I'm getting fairly burnt out with the always trying to get clients and dealing with some of the clients.
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    • Profile picture of the author boatree
      It's always great to hear stories like this as it presents you with the "other side". The grim reality for some people.

      In response to yourself - having my own business is not my primary motivator in doing this as I have built other businesses in the past and have popped that cherry.

      What I am looking for, is the freedom that having my own business grants me (similarly to Seb), and knowing that the hard work I am putting in, will ultimately contribute to building something that is my asset. The best part is in knowing that the harder I work, the bigger my asset will grow.

      What I really like about this model is that it fits very well with my career background and "strengths" if you will. I've worked in B2B sales for 6 years and have utilized cold calling as the primary way to generate meetings and have closed off the back of the meetings. Using cold calling seems to be one the key ways people use to succeed with this business model.

      It's also comforting to know that a lot of the local business owners are not managers or owners of larger sized businesses. I just know it will be a much easier sell than what I am use to.

      Knowing that I need to be cold calling from 9-5 is precisely one of the reasons why I think it may be wise to make the switch. So I can give this a serious shot full time. But to be safe, I will start off doing it on Saturdays first and seeing how I go from there.

      Thanks for sharing your feedback.


      Originally Posted by rbecklund View Post

      Mine, might not be so uplifting and motivational - just realistic...

      I agree with not quitting your day job. I'm seeing it first hand, my partner quit her job over a year ago and is now looking for a job. I lost my job and had no other options but do this. I enjoy this, but living off cash flow like we do can be very stressful.

      While this can click for some people, I would hazard a guess that most people doing this are working FT, PT or struggling. There are people killing it and there are those that are killing it and selling products to newcomers (I'm always skeptical of those figures).

      While you're working you can do direct marketing, email marketing (targeted works best), PPC, etc. I cold call and I get frustrated because you kind of have to do it during 9-5 if you really want to get the volume of calls in.

      Also, there has to be something about this that you love. To me, just wanting your own business might not be enough. After 2 years of this full-time and I'm getting fairly burnt out with the always trying to get clients and dealing with some of the clients.
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      • Profile picture of the author John Durham
        Originally Posted by boatree View Post


        It's also comforting to know that a lot of the local business owners are not managers or owners of larger sized businesses. I just know it will be a much easier sell than what I am use to.
        With most commercial lists like info usa... you can select to only call businesses with 5 employees or less, ensuring that 50% of the owners either answer the phone or are within arms reach of the secretary in alot of industries. In other words, they arent large corporate chains.

        This way it doesnt take 3 board meetings to get a decision. Most indy biz owners can make a decision on the spot if they choose to. You can target those guys only with a commercial call list.
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    • Profile picture of the author bizgrower
      Originally Posted by rbecklund View Post

      Mine, might not be so uplifting and motivational - just realistic...

      I agree with not quitting your day job. I'm seeing it first hand, my partner quit her job over a year ago and is now looking for a job. I lost my job and had no other options but do this. I enjoy this, but living off cash flow like we do can be very stressful.

      While this can click for some people, I would hazard a guess that most people doing this are working FT, PT or struggling. There are people killing it and there are those that are killing it and selling products to newcomers (I'm always skeptical of those figures).

      While you're working you can do direct marketing, email marketing (targeted works best), PPC, etc. I cold call and I get frustrated because you kind of have to do it during 9-5 if you really want to get the volume of calls in.

      Also, there has to be something about this that you love. To me, just wanting your own business might not be enough. After 2 years of this full-time and I'm getting fairly burnt out with the always trying to get clients and dealing with some of the clients.
      Hire a commision sales rep, improve marketing efforts (systems) and increase prices, and endeavor to hire someone to do the customer service so you can do the parts you like.

      Dan
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      "If you think you're the smartest person in the room, then you're probably in the wrong room."

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  • Profile picture of the author Mogly
    Yeah, I've heard most people wait till their online income was equal to offline before making the switch to 100% entrepreneurship.
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  • Profile picture of the author DaniMc
    You have 12 months worth of savings? I have a suggestion.

    Instead of quitting the job and spending the next 12 months slugging it out selling, keep your job and create systems that will bring you customers.

    If your plan is be out there selling your services and the running your business and then fulfilling your service offering, you are really going to struggle.

    You need to be creating SYSTEMS which bring you revenue. A business is a collection of systems that create clients.

    So, take half of that savings and start building these systems via advertising and promotional ideas and networking when you have time. You wont have time to fulfill the services yourself, which the EXACT same situation you will be in the future. If you plan on ANY sort of growth, you just will not be able fulfill these yourself. So build it that way from day one. Don't fool yourself into thinking you will have more time when you quit your job. Your list just gets longer.

    Then, when you have your systems in place and are making consistent sales, you quit your job and supplement your income with the remaining savings.
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    • Profile picture of the author boatree
      Thanks all.

      With the mention of systems needing to be put into place, can you guys offer your thoughts on the below (hopefully this can help any other guys thinking of starting their offline biz):

      My plan specifically is to have all of the JV relationships already organised by the time I launch the business.

      Prior to launching, I will know exactly who I will be outsourcing certain tasks to (I will find and review different article/newsletter service provider, a separate web development/design company, a separate SEO company etc and decide on who I will be using);

      OR

      I will go down the road of utilising two separate friends and their existing companies who specialise in doing all of the web development/design/seo work etc and splitting a 50/50 fee with them.

      The client will be mine and I will earn all of the residual income from the email marketing/newsletter/article writing services I will provide through a separate provider.

      By being able to hand over the jobs to my friends companies or the separate outsourcing service providers, I will be able to take a project manager stance with the project work and focus the majority of my time making cold calls, utilising email marketing, CL/gumtree and other forms of advertising to contact additional prospects for meetings to drum up new business.

      My focus is to put on the sales & marketing hat for the business and generate clients with the focus of building monthly residual cash flow from the additional services that will be offered.

      I am currently in the process of mapping out prospective clients through the yellow pages on an excel spreadsheet, and will conduct basic research on every business I am going to call/email market to so my emails or my cold calls can be very tailored to each client.

      PS. Before launching into this full time, I will be making a few calls on Saturdays and send out a few emails to prospective clients to "feel out" the market.

      Building the business prospect list will take up quite a few hours, but my experience in sales dictates that it's worth the time investment. The goal is to have a minimum of 300 companies mapped out so I will be kept very busy for the first two weeks in business making calls/email marketing and spend the next week doing a considerable amount of client meetings.

      After I have taken on a few clients through cold calling/email marketing I will then be contacting my extended network of friends and offer my services as I want an existing portfolio prior to selling sell to them (just the way I would prefer it).

      I will then expand the marketing side of things by delving into CL/Gumtree and look into other forms of advertising depending on the niches I am focusing on.

      Having no prior experience running a web development/design/IM consulting company, I want to make sure I don't have any major blind spots before entering.

      Can the guys who have been doing this offer any obvious blind spots or suggestions with the above plan please?

      Thanks
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      • Profile picture of the author bizgrower
        Originally Posted by sebski22 View Post

        Just put in my point. I left my 9-5 6 months ago to pursue my dream of owning my own biz. Your situation sounds very similar to mine, I have been a pretty successful salesperson over the past 6yrs and was earning a good living. However like you I thought there was something more inside me.

        The past 6 months have been an eye opener, I have 6 clients at the moment and this is just meeting my living expenses nothing more. I think I will make roughly 20k profit in my 1st 12 months , which is a considerable drop in wages for me.

        But it's not all about the money, I have learnt a lot about myself in the past 6 months and I love living life on my terms. So I personally feel far richer now than I ever did slugging away earning dollar for someone else.

        The biggest hurdle I have discovered is that I am far more comfortable selling someone else's products/services than my own. When I get a no for my business I take it personally, which has really held me back from pushing to the next level. I know what I need to go, I know how to do it but I still need to overcome my irrational fear of personal rejection.

        So as a small word of warning, be aware that selling yourself is far more difficult than selling a 3rd party product!
        One thing that might help is to NOT assume they rejected you personally. Maybe they are currently not ready to buy from anyone. Maybe they thought your price too high or too low(their budget, market perceptions, perception of low price = low quality), they don't know enough about your services to know what is a good price for the solution, they see $99 website ads on Craigslist and don't get - yet - that they need to spend $3000, they want $500,000.00 in revenues but just don't get it that it will take $5000/mo on advertising and marketing to get there - not the $400/mo they dream would do the job.

        It could be a host of other things - not you personally. It could also be that you somehow did not communicate that can provide the solutions they need. For example, you're right on track with state of the art internet marketing, but they think being on page one is whati it's all about when in their case it's not.

        So, if you can go back to some and find out why not so you can improve your offerings, ability to educate prospects, or whatever else which will improve your sales and marketing process.

        Another thing you might do is hire a salesman and/or joint venture as others have suggested.

        Originally Posted by boatree View Post

        Thanks all.

        With the mention of systems needing to be put into place, can you guys offer your thoughts on the below (hopefully this can help any other guys thinking of starting their offline biz):

        My plan specifically is to have all of the JV relationships already organised by the time I launch the business.

        Prior to launching, I will know exactly who I will be outsourcing certain tasks to (I will find and review different article/newsletter service provider, a separate web development/design company, a separate SEO company etc and decide on who I will be using);

        OR

        I will go down the road of utilising two separate friends and their existing companies who specialise in doing all of the web development/design/seo work etc and splitting a 50/50 fee with them.

        The client will be mine and I will earn all of the residual income from the email marketing/newsletter/article writing services I will provide through a separate provider.

        By being able to hand over the jobs to my friends companies or the separate outsourcing service providers, I will be able to take a project manager stance with the project work and focus the majority of my time making cold calls, utilising email marketing, CL/gumtree and other forms of advertising to contact additional prospects for meetings to drum up new business.

        My focus is to put on the sales & marketing hat for the business and generate clients with the focus of building monthly residual cash flow from the additional services that will be offered.

        I am currently in the process of mapping out prospective clients through the yellow pages on an excel spreadsheet, and will conduct basic research on every business I am going to call/email market to so my emails or my cold calls can be very tailored to each client.

        PS. Before launching into this full time, I will be making a few calls on Saturdays and send out a few emails to prospective clients to "feel out" the market.

        Building the business prospect list will take up quite a few hours, but my experience in sales dictates that it's worth the time investment. The goal is to have a minimum of 300 companies mapped out so I will be kept very busy for the first two weeks in business making calls/email marketing and spend the next week doing a considerable amount of client meetings.

        After I have taken on a few clients through cold calling/email marketing I will then be contacting my extended network of friends and offer my services as I want an existing portfolio prior to selling sell to them (just the way I would prefer it).

        I will then expand the marketing side of things by delving into CL/Gumtree and look into other forms of advertising depending on the niches I am focusing on.

        Having no prior experience running a web development/design/IM consulting company, I want to make sure I don't have any major blind spots before entering.

        Can the guys who have been doing this offer any obvious blind spots or suggestions with the above plan please?

        Thanks
        The service providers you are thinking about may let you use their portfolios as yours. So that issue may be somewhat resolved, and it was something I was going to suggest because people may "buy" you in your current field, but need proof in your new endeavor.

        Market to people in person through live events such as Chamber of Commerce events, church, community service organizations, places you volunteer your time such as animal shelters, Meet Up groups (or the Australian equivalent).

        Facebook or linked in...

        Dan
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        "If you think you're the smartest person in the room, then you're probably in the wrong room."

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      • Profile picture of the author DaniMc
        Originally Posted by boatree View Post


        Prior to launching, I will know exactly who I will be outsourcing certain tasks to (I will find and review different article/newsletter service provider, a separate web development/design company, a separate SEO company etc and decide on who I will be using);

        OR

        I will go down the road of utilising two separate friends and their existing companies who specialise in doing all of the web development/design/seo work etc and splitting a 50/50 fee with them.

        The client will be mine and I will earn all of the residual income from the email marketing/newsletter/article writing services I will provide through a separate provider.

        By being able to hand over the jobs to my friends companies or the separate outsourcing service providers, I will be able to take a project manager stance with the project work and focus the majority of my time making cold calls, utilising email marketing, CL/gumtree and other forms of advertising to contact additional prospects for meetings to drum up new business.
        When I make a comparison of these two models, one immediately jumps out as the better option.

        If you find all the people to outsource the work to, you will then be acting as an active project manager. This will severely limit the amount of time you can spend marketing. (Always strive to spend at least 80% of your time marketing and no more than 20% fulfilling)

        If you have contacts who are already running successful firms you can just hand ALL the work over to them and you wont have to manage the project. You get to keep 50%...which is a little lower than option one, but with many fewer headaches.

        Just make sure your relationship is formal and clearly constructed contractually. This can't be based on friendship. There will eventually be a differing of opinion and both sides will remember things differently. You MUST have a document to refer back to settle disagreements. Not saying it has to get ugly, but if the contract is not clear you can almost guarantee things will go south eventually. A clear contract will keep your business relationship solid.
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        • Profile picture of the author boatree
          Cool Dan,

          Thanks for your input.


          Originally Posted by Dan McCoy View Post

          When I make a comparison of these two models, one immediately jumps out as the better option.

          If you find all the people to outsource the work to, you will then be acting as an active project manager. This will severely limit the amount of time you can spend marketing. (Always strive to spend at least 80% of your time marketing and no more than 20% fulfilling)

          If you have contacts who are already running successful firms you can just hand ALL the work over to them and you wont have to manage the project. You get to keep 50%...which is a little lower than option one, but with many fewer headaches.

          Just make sure your relationship is formal and clearly constructed contractually. This can't be based on friendship. There will eventually be a differing of opinion and both sides will remember things differently. You MUST have a document to refer back to settle disagreements. Not saying it has to get ugly, but if the contract is not clear you can almost guarantee things will go south eventually. A clear contract will keep your business relationship solid.
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  • Profile picture of the author bluecoyotemedia
    Dan

    you seem to always hit it right spot on the money my friend. could not have said it any better.

    the ole saying " when you want something done right you gotta do it yourself" is one of the biggest challenges I still have because in order for someone to build a business you have to take yourself out of the equation and build systems

    eddie
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    Skunkworks: noun. informal.

    A clandestine group operating without any external intervention or oversight. Such groups achieve significant breakthroughs rarely discussed in public because they operate "outside the box".
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    • Profile picture of the author DaniMc
      Originally Posted by bluecoyotemedia View Post

      Dan

      you seem to always hit it right spot on the money my friend. could not have said it any better.

      the ole saying " when you want something done right you gotta do it yourself" is one of the biggest challenges I still have because in order for someone to build a business you have to take yourself out of the equation and build systems

      eddie
      Thanks Eddie. I'm only 36 but have many hard won scars and grey hairs (on my chin, not my head).

      Business is all about leverage. You can't win just by working harder. You have to leverage advertising media. You have to leverage the work of other people. You have to leverage marketplaces which support what you do.

      Working harder leads to death. Using leverage brings a whole different outlook.
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  • Profile picture of the author John Durham
    Agreed (Dan),

    If you have the money, and time... use it to invest in yourself and develop some systems that will give you leverage. If you dont have money or time I suggest telemarketing, because it yields quick results with virtually no investment required but a little hard work, however, again, if you can afford yourself a learning curve and some experimentation- Do it.

    I speak telemarketing mostly to people who need to make money "yesterday" and cant afford that time or investment required to experiment. They have to earn money first to afford those things.

    Fortunately, my own efforts have afforded me the experimentation, such as list building and copy writing ads...knowing how to place them..., so at this point , whenever I feel like going for it, its just a matter of implementing what I have learned from that experience and time of investment. In other words: it wont require as much money, because I can now hit the target without losing most times.

    In short:

    There IS effortless business, but I can honestly say there is also alot of experimentation required in order to own the concepts that will bring it to you, which is why shiny bells and whistles wont work for a person in a desperate position and telemarketing is better in that case, because its guaranteed business just about, for anyone willing to do it..

    Looks like this guy is positioned to afford that time for himself .

    -John
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