How to do Offline Marketing Without Selling Your Soul

22 replies
1. Don't lie
2. Provide a good service so you don't have to.
#marketing #offline #selling #soul
  • Profile picture of the author flnz400
    Such depth. Would read again!!
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    • Profile picture of the author AndrewCavanagh
      This is an important topic.

      Providing a genuinely valuable service and going out of your
      way to make sure your clients make more profits from your
      service then they pay you in fees should help to build your
      soul rather than sell it.

      It also helps if you only work with businesses you feel okay
      with (I don't help tobacconists for example. In fact there are
      quite a few business types I have no interest in helping).

      The great thing about this business model is you can do it
      on your own terms.

      Kindest regards,
      Andrew Cavanagh
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  • Profile picture of the author tryinhere
    How to do Offline Marketing Without Selling Your Soul
    What does offline marketing have to do with anything ? Is it more your overall lifestyle choice to do the right thing by all regardless of what you do.
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    | > Choosing to go off the grid for a while to focus on family, work and life in general. Have a great 2020 < |
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    • Profile picture of the author PaulintheSticks
      Originally Posted by AndrewCavanagh View Post

      This is an important topic.

      It also helps if you only work with businesses you feel okay
      with (I don't help tobacconists for example. In fact there are
      quite a few business types I have no interest in helping).
      I agree Andrew. To me its just as important to pick businesses that I feel add value to other people's lives as it is to pick ones that have a marketing budget. I've been watching some guru videos lately (Jay Abraham, Brian Tracy, etc.) and one thing that really hit home is that you don't have to compromise your integrity to make a living. The key is to focus on adding value to your clients' lives.

      Originally Posted by tryinhere View Post

      What does offline marketing have to do with anything ? Is it more your overall lifestyle choice to do the right thing by all regardless of what you do.
      Pete, you're right it does apply to everything you do in life but since this is an offline forum, I thought it best to tie it in. Plus there is so much dishonesty when it comes to selling and such a temptation to say things that just aren't true that its really easy to fall into that trap.
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      • Profile picture of the author kenmichaels
        Originally Posted by PaulintheSticks View Post


        Plus there is so much dishonesty when it comes to selling and such a temptation to say things that just aren't true that its really easy to fall into that trap.
        If you lie to some one to sell something, the person is going to find out.

        When that happens, your looking at a refund.

        The temptation should really be to be as brutally honest as possible.

        I mean after all, you do want to keep the sale right?

        New people say what you said a lot, because they don't know better.
        The more seasoned reps never want to lie.
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        • Profile picture of the author Claude Whitacre
          Originally Posted by kenmichaels View Post

          If you lie to some one to sell something, the person is going to find out.

          When that happens, your looking at a refund.

          The temptation should really be to be as brutally honest as possible.

          I mean after all, you do want to keep the sale right?

          New people say what you said a lot, because they don't know better.
          The more seasoned reps never want to lie.
          I honestly don't know if, deep down, I object to lying because of morality issues. I never think of it that way. But....

          Lying in business is a business mistake. I've never known a business person, making any kind of real money, who miss-represents to anyone. It's simply a stupid thing to do.

          The single biggest asset you have when selling is the trust of your client/customer. Do you want to know the best way to permanently destroy that trust? One lie.

          Do you know who I hear lying? New reps that simply have no clue how to sell.
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      • Profile picture of the author tryinhere
        Originally Posted by PaulintheSticks View Post

        Pete, you're right it does apply to everything you do in life but since this is an offline forum, I thought it best to tie it in. Plus there is so much dishonesty when it comes to selling and such a temptation to say things that just aren't true that its really easy to fall into that trap.
        No it is not period, choosing to tell porkies is a choice and for that reason some people make a bad choice in sales now these people are not sales people but snake oil salesman and we see these people we are all up in arms, it is just as easy to be down the line.

        A very true and timely tale last night I drove over an hour one way to meet with a client, it was only a small 3K deal type thing but one of the first questions can we do this, my straight answer was "no" so with that I enjoyed a glass of cool drink in the 40 degree heat and turned around and came home.

        Now call it silly but I will not treat anyone in any other way I want to be treated and nor will I lie to anyone to get a sale, life is to long and the world is to small for bullcrap and your customers will usually find you.

        Selling on a pile of crock is a short way to a few quick dollars, selling on honesty and respect can lead to a lifetime of profits and sustained incomes with no extra effort.
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        | > Choosing to go off the grid for a while to focus on family, work and life in general. Have a great 2020 < |
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  • Profile picture of the author Jason Kanigan
    The interesting thing here is that the OP has created interest with his very brief post.

    Being truthful and being able to do what you say you can do is vital. Many people get into offline marketing with a minimal skill set, don't believe in what they can do, and crash & burn. The important thing is that you be up front with your prospect about your limitations, or be able to get dependable outsourcing to meet the need. Don't get in over your head.
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  • Profile picture of the author sreeharshasp
    Banned
    Today's Offline marketing is all about "Relationship Building". If you really want to build a long term ongoing business, the customer needs to feel that you are genuinely interested to solve his offline problem and your product would solve his problem.

    This would come with lot of practice and you need to get a coach, who can help you to understand what are the mistakes you have been doing and correct it.
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  • Profile picture of the author DaniMc
    I always enjoy hearing when people buy into the idea of the corrupt business multi-millionaire whose only goal in life is to loot pillage and plunder.

    It just isn't a reality. People do not rise to the top by being jerks or dishonest. Now there are times when people get to the top they are tempted to do wrong and some fall victim to the temptation. But I've worked with, met, and been mentored by venture capitalists, officials, and CEO's at every level of Federal Government (Presidential appointees), State Government (Governors board), Private sector (Silicon Valley and beyond VC's) and I have NEVER met someone who wasn't genuine, happy, nice, and eager to help good people do good things.

    Sure, there may be a bad seed here and there but OVERALL people do not become successful by being dishonest, mean, hateful, or selfish.

    If you are trying to be successful and you are behaving in these ways, people like myself and most others I know will just use you when convenient but as a rule will not recommend or promote you or allow our names to be attached to you in any way.

    If you continually wonder why others get ahead of you, it may be that your character flaws are all too obvious and soul-searching and self-improvement is the answer.
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    Be kind, for everyone you meet is fighting a hard battle.
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    • Profile picture of the author Claude Whitacre
      Originally Posted by Dan McCoy View Post

      I always enjoy hearing when people buy into the idea of the corrupt business multi-millionaire whose only goal in life is to loot pillage and plunder.

      It just isn't a reality. People do not rise to the top by being jerks or dishonest. Now there are times when people get to the top they are tempted to do wrong and some fall victim to the temptation. But I've worked with, met, and been mentored by venture capitalists, officials, and CEO's at every level of Federal Government (Presidential appointees), State Government (Governors board), Private sector (Silicon Valley and beyond VC's) and I have NEVER met someone who wasn't genuine, happy, nice, and eager to help good people do good things.

      Sure, there may be a bad seed here and there but OVERALL people do not become successful by being dishonest, mean, hateful, or selfish.

      If you are trying to be successful and you are behaving in these ways, people like myself and most others I know will just use you when convenient but as a rule will not recommend or promote you or allow our names to be attached to you in any way.

      If you continually wonder why others get ahead of you, it may be that your character flaws are all to obvious and soul-searching and self-improvement is the answer.
      WOW! Phenomenal post. (It's phenomenal because I agree with it. Let's be honest here :rolleyes: )

      The late Jim Rohn once said something like "You get large sums of money after you prove you can be trusted with large sums of money"

      Yeah, I lean a little left of most of you, but the idea that evil people run major corporations is just a myth. Who would work for someone they know is evil? Lex Luthor is not real.

      I had an in-law ask me once (my being the only business owner in the family) "Companies rip people off. Are you one of the ones that rip people off?"

      My reply "If someone treats you badly, how many more times will you buy from them?'

      Her "None"

      Me "Precisely. That's why you treat everyone well, and never try to take advantage of them...because the vast majority of my money comes from repeat customers."

      I know a few things from watching TV shows and movies;
      Salespeople are always..always slime.
      People who own large companies are, for some unknown reason, always bent on destroying the world.
      Smart people are always shown (at the end of the movie) that intelligence is evil, and emotion is good.
      All aliens (from space) are emotionless, and are shown the wisdom of love.
      If a nice person gets a ton of money, the right thing to do is throw it in the street.
      Homeless people are always nice.
      Teenagers are always smarter than their parents. And are better at solving crimes.
      Dogs can talk, and nobody thinks it's odd.

      OK, I'm winding down now, but Dan, very nice couple of thought you had there.
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  • Profile picture of the author Claude Whitacre
    Originally Posted by PaulintheSticks View Post

    1. Don't lie
    2. Provide a good service so you don't have to.
    OK, Paul. I'm really with you on the not lying part. But providing a good service?
    Have you run the numbers on that? Good service costs money. NO Service is lots cheaper. See? I'm telling the truth. I consider it a fair compromise.:rolleyes:
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  • Profile picture of the author sandalwood
    Originally Posted by PaulintheSticks View Post

    1. Don't lie
    2. Provide a good service so you don't have to.
    Since I get to visit my cardiologist between 2 and 3 times a year I wonder if he is excluded from the above. He prescribes me pills that are supposed to do a certain thing but when you research them and learn all the side effects, I wonder if he lied. And, did he provide a good service so he doesn't have to?

    I had to see another doctor about another physical condition. Told him about my heart meds. He immediately prescribed a med that under no circumstances should be taken w/the heart meds I was taking at the time. The pharmacist told me that and even said if I take this certain med I could end up in the ER that same day.

    Hmmm, was the doctor providing me a service or himself a paycheck?

    I only bring this up because both doctors work offline. I didn't visit either via the Internet.

    I guess maybe the above advice has certain limits like you have to have a conscience or you really shouldn't be on the payroll and pretending you aren't.

    I hope I'm not too esoteric here but it seems to me all the posts have been limited in scope. Marketing is a hell of lot bigger than we realize. Let's face facts everything out there is a business and it needs to market itself to stay alive.

    For proof I offer the government. It markets itself on a daily basis.

    BTW, I still visit the cardiologist. I look at it like taking the car in for an oil change. If you don't, it will quit running one day.

    Just my 2¢...

    Tom
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    • Profile picture of the author Claude Whitacre
      I find it interesting that someone says "Don't lie" and we all have something to say about it (Including me).

      As though it were a controversial thing to say. Notice, of course that I was the first one to declare that I didn't lie all that much. A very daring declaration indeed.

      "Don't punch old people in the nose". That's it, I'm taking that stand. I think punching old people is wrong. Say what you will, I still think there are better ways of dealing with older people than punching them in the nose.

      Claude "The Rebel" Whitacre
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    • Profile picture of the author Adrian Browning
      Banned
      Originally Posted by flnz400 View Post

      Such depth. Would read again!!
      I actually did laugh out loud... fantastic

      Originally Posted by kenmichaels View Post

      If you lie to some one to sell something, the person is going to find out.

      When that happens, your looking at a refund.
      Actually no, not necessarily...

      I have a fairly large stake in a very well known Food Processing Company - and if you are a regular consumer of any frozen foods, you'd be shocked to find out what it is that you are actually putting in your mouth.

      Companies lie to their consumers each and everyday, which is why industries such as Marketing & Advertising are a vital necessity. I mean, people don't just come out and say - '''well hey, you know those jackets we shipped you last week with the "Chinchilla lining" - it was actually a less honorable alternative - Cocker Spaniel fur.. and yes, you just increased our profit tenfold. thanks'''.. No, people don't just do that.

      A good Ad Agency (such as mine) can make a piss poor product sell as if it were the cure to full blown scurvy... But yes, this is life and money 'does' make the World go round - and you'd be naive to think that people aren't going to extreme lengths just to line their pockets.

      Originally Posted by Claude Whitacre View Post

      Lying in business is a business mistake. I've never known a business person, making any kind of real money, who miss-represents to anyone. It's simply a stupid thing to do.
      Woah... Well, actually you'd be surprised..

      Take the Real Estate industry for example. It is riddled with scams, lies and bold faced fabrications. People get taken - without knowing it - each and every day.

      My rental properties get leased out for 'quadruple' the amount they are worth, why? - so that the company that manages them can get a little something to wet their beaks with at the end of each month. But hey, I constantly have tenants and no empty apartments - so should I now feel bad that I am making nearly three times what I should be out of these properties? my answer: 'Are the tenants complaining' - No!

      Look at Donald Trump... He openly admits to scamming world leaders such as Gadhafi after renting him a piece of land...Gadhafi paid more, in one night, than that piece of land was worth for two years.. and just to sprinkle some extra salt in the wounds, Trump didn't even allow him to use the land... Did he feel bad about it - No!

      People who are at a prominent level, have to do a lot of dirt to get there... PERIOD! Which is why the average man remains mediocre. He isn't willing to learn the Law, and then learn it's loop holes... But to even have the motivation to do all of that, you need to actually experience what it is like to do business with some of these people - 'THEN', after witnessing the sheer savagery of these corporations, you'll gain a firm understanding that the phrase "Dog eat Dog World" is no joke.

      - Adrian
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    • Profile picture of the author bizgrower
      Originally Posted by sandalwood View Post

      Since I get to visit my cardiologist between 2 and 3 times a year I wonder if he is excluded from the above. He prescribes me pills that are supposed to do a certain thing but when you research them and learn all the side effects, I wonder if he lied. And, did he provide a good service so he doesn't have to?

      I had to see another doctor about another physical condition. Told him about my heart meds. He immediately prescribed a med that under no circumstances should be taken w/the heart meds I was taking at the time. The pharmacist told me that and even said if I take this certain med I could end up in the ER that same day.

      Hmmm, was the doctor providing me a service or himself a paycheck?

      I only bring this up because both doctors work offline. I didn't visit either via the Internet.

      I guess maybe the above advice has certain limits like you have to have a conscience or you really shouldn't be on the payroll and pretending you aren't.

      I hope I'm not too esoteric here but it seems to me all the posts have been limited in scope. Marketing is a hell of lot bigger than we realize. Let's face facts everything out there is a business and it needs to market itself to stay alive.

      For proof I offer the government. It markets itself on a daily basis.

      BTW, I still visit the cardiologist. I look at it like taking the car in for an oil change. If you don't, it will quit running one day.

      Just my 2¢...

      Tom
      Competence and Information Overload

      Tom,

      Sorry you have heart issues.

      My Dad did too. He had open heart surgery for the blockages at what was supposed to be the top hospital in the area for that type of issue. The cardiologist on that team had a superb reputation in the field and was recommended by my Dad's person physician of
      35 years.

      A year later, he had a huge emergency episode and was - out of necessity - taken to another hospital and needed open heart again. We interviewed the team at the first hospital and the team at the second hospital for this second open heart. The team at the second hospital was so far advanced over the team at the first hospital that it was scary. Literally scary.

      The first team literally had no knowledge of the electronic device (defibrilator implant) my Dad needed. The cardiologist and surgeon on the team at the second hospital were just far more impressive and competent than their couterparts at the first hospital. The second hospital also had a man on board who was an MD and had a Master's degree in Electrical Engineering and helped this team be state of the art and up to date.

      It was obvious that the first team had been resting on their laurels and had not kept up with new technology and research.

      So, keeping in mind that I'm just a marketing guy and business manager, if you were my brother, I'd strongly suggest that you get second or third opinions - including from naturopathic doctors - about your condition and medication and diet... And, make sure they all know what you are doing so you don't take any mis-steps, or have a toxic or fatal mix of medications.

      And, KEEP THE SAME PHARMACIST IN THE LOOP, because knowing drug impacts and interactions are what they are really trained to do. A friend of mine died at age 49 because without telling the other, she went to two different doctors for the same thing -and took different prescriptions and the interaction was fatal.

      Dan

      -----------------------------------------------

      My addition to this interesting thread is that competence, or lack therof, and not deception is certainly a factor for any business. While not a good thing, one can be less competent than another, but not be intentionally deceptive in their marketing or selling.

      And, because all fields change, keeping up or not is another factor. It's possible for a business to do what they do and not be INTENTIONALLY deceptive, but also not be up to date on everything, or able to offer all solutions.

      I just interviewed a very competent DRUPAL coder for a project and I don't hold it against him, but his view of WordPress was likely valid 5 years ago. He is a one man operation and his solution is about $2000 higher than the WP proposals and he is probably keeping busy enough in his DRUPAL world and I don't expect him to go forth and become a WP expert as well. (Maybe partner if he wants to expand his business.) WP will be just fine for this project and budget.
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  • Profile picture of the author sdentrepreneur
    I just deliver results, one of my main clients is netting $20K per month in new clients directly from my Offline Marketing. No need to lie, just deliver and make it trackable.

    JMH
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