When You Get An Objection

by Joel 18 replies
When you get an objection ... remember,

a) An objection is an opinion

b) Opinion's may or or may not be correct

c) Opinions are based on experience or information

To change someone's objection, you must change their experience or information.

Joel
#offline marketing #objection
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  • Profile picture of the author PaulintheSticks
    I guess I look at objections as more of a perception or frame of reference than an opinion. And perception is reality so changing the way someone views something is the ticket. Just semantics though. Its funny how you can have "no-brainer" information sometimes but it won't budge their perception.
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  • Profile picture of the author Maxwell Stinson
    Well that's true. People don't object just because they can, they object because they have some knowledge surrounding your proposal, or have had a bad experience with dealing with a certain scenario.

    People's decision to object is based entirely on their own experiences so you shouldn't feel as if people object to what you have to offer or what you say just because they can easily say no.
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  • Profile picture of the author misterme
    In my experience there are real objections, reflex objections and stalls. Which one of those features opinions?
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    • Profile picture of the author Joel
      Originally Posted by misterme View Post

      In my experience there are real objections, reflex objections and stalls. Which one of those features opinions?
      They all are .... whatever the objection is it is an opinion based on the experience and/or information that the objection giver has ... to attempt to change the decision making process you have to either change the experience or provide information that gives the objection giver another opinion.

      Joel
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    • Profile picture of the author Jason Kanigan
      Originally Posted by misterme View Post

      In my experience there are real objections, reflex objections and stalls. Which one of those features opinions?
      Yeah yeah yeah

      That's the stuff.

      "I'm not interested" is the Queen of reflex objections.

      Now a legit objection sounds like, "But it won't be ready for 4 weeks and I need it in 2," or, "Wait, that comes in black and I want it in red."

      Instead of leaping to the conclusion, step back and ask another question to find out WHY they are doing that..."Okay...so...what will happen if it isn't ready in 2 weeks?" or "Can you share with me how it would perform differently if it was red not black?" (Makes me think of those welding helmets with the flames on the side--they make you weld faster.)

      A real objection is actually a buying signal. The prospect is telling you: If you take care of this thing for me, I will buy.
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  • Profile picture of the author Rearden
    The best salesmen rarely have true objections as they handle them all ahead of time.
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  • Profile picture of the author misterme
    When it's an objection that's really a stall, no dissecting it proves useful because it's only a smokescreen thrown at the salesperson. It's not the truth. So it's like wrestling with a phantom. Asking the prospect questions about it prompts more smoke and mirrors from the prospect keeping the salesperson on a wild goose chase.

    "I need this in size 5, but you only have up to size 2" is perhaps more of a truthful real objection, though it's certainly not an opinion, it's a fact. No amount of questioning why they feel they need a size 5 is going to change that fact.

    Asking the prospect WHY their objection is so, prompting them to explain further their reasons behind it, has the effect of them deepening their commitment to their position. The real question is, why would you ask a prospect to, in effect, to focus on their reasons for not buying instead of reasons for buying and having them further fortify their position why they're not buying. Like this: "I need this in black but you only offer red, and since you asked, here's why I can only take it in black. Our customers buy black over red 83% of the time and we easily get a 23% premium in price for it over red. Black's more profitable for us. We simply have a higher demand for black. We make more money with black. We're primarily known for black. We have all the red we need. Red doesn't move as fast as black. We can sell black all day long but not red. We're running low on black. We're overstocked on red. So we need it in black."

    Or maybe the real question is why are they raising objections to buying? Objections aren't selling signals, that's a myth. Buyers act like buyers - not like people who object to making the purchase. People who aren't buying are the ones who raise objections. Otherwise they'd embrace the sale. A person who's hungry doesn't say, "I'm not hungry today. I'll have to think about food another time. Maybe later this week. I have to figure out what food I need to buy first. I think I have to sleep on it." A hungry person who'll buy thinks more like, "I'm famished. I need something to eat. Your food looks tasty. I want it. I like the hamburger. I'll try that." Likewise, someone hungry for your wares doesn't put themselves off. They want to buy.
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    • Profile picture of the author harryharris
      What a great thread.

      In my view it has a lot to do with how you enter the sales process...

      How pre-qualified is the buyer?

      How do they view you in the process?

      I like to have an ideal client profile and then I only connect with them.

      I like to get a lot of these things out of the way BEFORE I meet with a clients with a pre appointment questionnaire to make sure they are qualified and in heat.

      I learned to do this when a company I worked for set appointments and the guys got paid for setting appointments to they took anything with a pulse basically.

      So I knew I had to find a way to make sure it was not a waste of my time.

      Then it had the upside of being an amazing positioning tool.

      Again great thread and thanks for starting it!

      H
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      • Profile picture of the author kenmichaels
        Originally Posted by harryharris View Post

        What a great thread.

        In my view it has a lot to do with how you enter the sales process...

        How pre-qualified is the buyer?

        How do they view you in the process?

        I like to have an ideal client profile and then I only connect with them.

        I like to get a lot of these things out of the way BEFORE I meet with a clients with a pre appointment questionnaire to make sure they are qualified and in heat.

        I learned to do this when a company I worked for set appointments and the guys got paid for setting appointments to they took anything with a pulse basically.

        So I knew I had to find a way to make sure it was not a waste of my time.

        Then it had the upside of being an amazing positioning tool.

        Again great thread and thanks for starting it!

        H
        Most people around here don't know about qualifying, Or even the difference
        between qualifying and pre qualifying.

        If you ever want to have a discussion about it that would be cool.
        I have tried before and its like pulling teeth.

        Welcome to the forum
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    • Profile picture of the author Claude Whitacre
      Originally Posted by misterme View Post

      When it's an objection that's really a stall, no dissecting it proves useful because it's only a smokescreen thrown at the salesperson. It's not the truth. So it's like wrestling with a phantom. Asking the prospect questions about it prompts more smoke and mirrors from the prospect keeping the salesperson on a wild goose chase.

      "I need this in size 5, but you only have up to size 2" is perhaps more of a truthful real objection, though it's certainly not an opinion, it's a fact. No amount of questioning why they feel they need a size 5 is going to change that fact.

      Asking the prospect WHY their objection is so, prompting them to explain further their reasons behind it, has the effect of them deepening their commitment to their position. The real question is, why would you ask a prospect to, in effect, to focus on their reasons for not buying instead of reasons for buying and having them further fortify their position why they're not buying.
      I've been gone three days listening to intelligent people talking about online marketing. Nothing came close to your post. With your permission, I'd like to take parts of it and quote you in my next book.

      Brilliant. I wish I had something to add. Claude

      WAIT! I have something to add. I'm guessing that 95% of all objections most salespeople get are just stalls. Sometimes the prospect is just reflexively saying the same thing they always say as a polite way of saying "No". But sometimes it just hasn't "soaked in" enough that they should buy. Usually this happens if price isn't mentioned until the last minute, and the client needs time to get used to the price. The Price kind of shocks them into defensive mode.

      That's why the first time I hear a stall, I usually ignore it. The second time, I'll ask them to do some mental work to explain their objection. Sometimes it breaks down, and sometimes it gets strengthened. If it gets strengthened, I know they just don't want to buy. In fact, any indication that they are moving away from buying is enough for me to stop closing. Changing their frame is about the only way I can brake their thinking pattern at that point.

      But the real question is...why are you getting objections at all?
      Objections aren't buying signals. They are signals that you screwed up in the selection and qualifying process. And that's true (in my experience) nearly 100% of the time.

      In my seminars, I'll ask "Think of something you bought that cost a lot of money...and you wanted it before you said "Yes". How many closes did it take for you to say "Yes"?"

      Almost everyone says None or One.

      I hear "The sale begins when the customer says "No"". Really? To me that means that the first place in the selling process that the salesperson is competent...is after the customer says "No".

      So there! :rolleyes:
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  • Profile picture of the author Jason Kanigan
    Ken suggests talking about the qualification process. I'll bite. Qualifying requires you to find out three things about your prospect. Are they a fit with you in terms of:

    * need

    * budget

    * personality.


    That's it. If you get three check marks, you can turn this person into a customer/client. Otherwise, throw 'em back, because they ain't a fit.

    Need = urgent want or need for what you offer. Make it quick--In or Out.

    Budget = can and wants to pay you what you feel you deserve. Note the second part. Not just "can pay you." We're talking about your self-esteem here. Work for peanuts and you'll feel ripped off, taken advantage of, and resentful. And it's YOUR FAULT. You chose to take them on as a client.

    Personality = treats you right. Takes your advice. Doesn't argue endlessly with everything you suggest. Doesn't yell at you. Although all three components of fit are equally important, this one stands out for me. I will not work with anyone I don't like, regardless of the need or money involved. This is also the one that's most difficult to uncover, but you can watch for clues. We've all had that 'favorite' client who keeps needing revisions, wants to make changes, wants to argue every point. Thing is, you allowed this to happen--you didn't get them to agree to a clear up front contract of how things were going to work before starting.

    You'll find that if you keep these three components of fit in mind, they will lead you to the questions you must ask. No more shuffling papers around while you're on the call, looking for the right question. Find out: do they have the need for what you offer? Can and do they want to pay you what you deserve? Can they work with you?

    Qualify. Sort. Separate. In or Out. Doesn't matter which. Accomplish it quickly. Takes me 4-6 minutes on the phone. Can do it several times an hour. Do it over and over, and you WILL uncover good prospects who you can turn into great clients.

    But you, dear newbie, won't do this. Because you're desperate for that sale. And so you're looking for that magic bullet, straining to turn everyone you talk to into a customer
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    • Originally Posted by Jason Kanigan View Post

      Qualify. Sort. Separate. In or Out. Doesn't matter which. Accomplish it quickly. Takes me 4-6 minutes on the phone. Can do it several times an hour. Do it over and over, and you WILL uncover good prospects who you can turn into great clients.

      But you, dear newbie, won't do this. Because you're desperate for that sale. And so you're looking for that magic bullet, straining to turn everyone you talk to into a customer
      I think it was JD who said something like most people try to turn suspects into prospects but should be finding prospects and turning them into sales.
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    • Profile picture of the author PaulintheSticks
      Originally Posted by kenmichaels View Post

      Most people around here don't know about qualifying, Or even the difference
      between qualifying and pre qualifying.

      If you ever want to have a discussion about it that would be cool.
      I have tried before and its like pulling teeth.
      I try not to worry about what other people know or do and worry about what I know and do.

      Originally Posted by Jason Kanigan View Post

      But you, dear newbie, won't do this. Because you're desperate for that sale. And so you're looking for that magic bullet, straining to turn everyone you talk to into a customer
      Brilliant post as always, Jason but that paragraph in particular is so important to remember. Otherwise you're going to waste massive amounts of time.
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    • Profile picture of the author misterme
      Originally Posted by Rearden View Post

      Let's talk more about pre-qualifying.
      OK. When I first started pre-qualifying, the goal of the initial phone inquiry was to sell the appointment. To try and sell my services, at the initial phone call, would be over reaching. As I progressed understanding what it meant for me to to pre-qualify, I found that I was more and more selling my services, though closing on it would still be over reaching.

      It became more about selling my services because I wanted to make sure I had someone who was a good fit and pre disposed to booking me. So now my pre qualifying serves to give me the information I'm looking for about their willingness to invest in me; their priority for my USPs; serves to lock out the competition; sets the agenda for the meeting. It also quickly positions me as the expert/trusted advisor.

      I want them 90%+ sold by the time we meet.

      Originally Posted by Jason Kanigan View Post

      Personality = treats you right. Takes your advice. Doesn't argue endlessly with everything you suggest. Doesn't yell at you. Although all three components of fit are equally important, this one stands out for me.
      I'll expound on that. I break "Personality" down to three parts. First is, if they express they want to do things their way rather than my way, bucking my policies, wrestling for control over how things will proceed and/or not following my directions... or too unintelligent to follow my directions... that's cause for not going forward.

      Secondly, if they say or do something that disrespects me, belittles me, they're out.

      Third, if they don't know who I am, speak like they're dealing with a generic nameless vendor, same as anyone else, that means they haven't taken in my material before we speak, which suggests they're not interested in knowing what makes me different and what that means for them, which means they're going to focus on price only, that's all they care about. I'm not interested in people who don't care about the "why."

      Originally Posted by Claude Whitacre View Post

      I've been gone three days listening to intelligent people talking about online marketing. Nothing came close to your post. With your permission, I'd like to take parts of it and quote you in my next book.

      Brilliant. I wish I had something to add. Claude
      WAIT! I have something to add...

      ...The second time, I'll ask them to do some mental work to explain their objection. Sometimes it breaks down, and sometimes it gets strengthened. If it gets strengthened, I know they just don't want to buy. In fact, any indication that they are moving away from buying is enough for me to stop closing. Changing their frame is about the only way I can brake their thinking pattern at that point.
      Or maybe as Klaff also suggests, exciting their lizard brain by throwing in something novel.

      Speaking of novels, yes of course you may quote me in your new book. I get a comp copy, hot off the press. Autographed.
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  • Profile picture of the author Rearden
    Let's talk more about pre-qualifying. There's plenty about closing and prospecting on this forum.

    I've experimented with pre-qualifying prior to setting an appointment, versus simply setting the appointment, no pre-qual.

    Most people who will see you in person have an interest-level. Some will have knee-jerk objections (send something in the mail and I'll decide, etc.), but if you can get through them thoughtfully, you'll meet them anyway.

    When you do face-to-face sales, mostly I think it's important to sell the appointment versus selling over the phone. Mostly.

    But once I'm in the door, I pre-qualify immediately after so-called rapport-building.

    To make the sale, what I have to know is:

    1) Need and Want for Life Insurance
    2) Health
    3) Has a savings/checking account (needed for most carriers to do direct drafts of premiums).
    4) Trial close (If I can qualify you, can you afford $X per month, working on the high end first, then working lower and lower, maximizing premium-commitment ahead of time).

    If they fail any of those pre-qual questions, I'm out of there. Presentation doesn't even occur. No point wasting time.

    After I pre-qualify on the fundamentals, then I present the options for covering final expenses. Kinda like an apples-versus-oranges comparison.

    Basically, I show them what my competition does differently, how the product could be detrimental to the prospect, and show how mine could be superior.

    I say "could" as that allows them draw their own conclusions, ie, sell themselves on the superior product. Sure, I guide them along, but, as I like to say, I like to let the prospect "hang herself."

    The best life insurance salesmen show up in person or call over the phone with the goal of seeing them immediately (if in person) for a 10-minute interview, or to sell the appointment.

    I have pre-qual'ed over the phone and it does work for me. But showing up, anecdotally, tends to get me more consistent results.

    How about you guys? How do you define and approach pre-qualifying?
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  • Profile picture of the author helisell
    'Objection' or 'Resistance'?....that is the question.

    When you ask someone to go ahead/sign up/order or whatever,
    you know, the kind of thing that happens towards the end of a
    sales process (some folks might call it the close) THAT right then
    is when objections arise.

    When you are attempting to get a sales process going
    (long before the close usually) THAT right then is when you get
    'resistance'.

    In between the start and the end of the sales process you will
    get many scenarios but they are not what we'd call either
    'resistance' or 'objections'

    I call them...points to be clarified, questions to be answered, doubts
    to be allayed....but NOT objections.

    'Objections' can only happen after a close has been attempted (else
    what are they objecting to exactly?)

    Resistance is what they do when they don't want to let us get started.

    Everything else is just 'stuff to be handled'
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    • Profile picture of the author Claude Whitacre
      Originally Posted by misterme View Post

      Speaking of novels, yes of course you may quote me in your new book. I get a comp copy, hot off the press. Autographed.
      Done. Autographed? Absolutely. Autographed by ME? Priceless.:rolleyes:


      Originally Posted by helisell View Post

      'Objection' or 'Resistance'?....that is the question.

      When you ask someone to go ahead/sign up/order or whatever,
      you know, the kind of thing that happens towards the end of a
      sales process (some folks might call it the close) THAT right then
      is when objections arise.

      When you are attempting to get a sales process going
      (long before the close usually) THAT right then is when you get
      'resistance'.

      In between the start and the end of the sales process you will
      get many scenarios but they are not what we'd call either
      'resistance' or 'objections'

      I call them...points to be clarified, questions to be answered, doubts
      to be allayed....but NOT objections.

      'Objections' can only happen after a close has been attempted (else
      what are they objecting to exactly?)

      Resistance is what they do when they don't want to let us get started.

      Everything else is just 'stuff to be handled'
      My God. I've been studying sales (and making money at selling) for three decades. You could say I'm an expert. At no time has anyone actually explained why they are objections at the end of the close and not objections before that. A very nice piece of work there, my friend. And, with your permission, a free copy autographed to you too, if I can include that little addition.
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  • Profile picture of the author helisell
    Big smile here Claude.

    I bought your book a little while ago but would love a signed copy and feel free to include my small input.

    ;0)

    P.S.. Just realised it was your small business advertising book I bought. Nice work.
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