How To Handle Face To Face Appointments - Leveraging Questions For Pitching And Closing More Easily!

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Dear Appointment Setting Offliners,

By the end of this post, you will see how easy face to face selling by appointment can be, and it should ease some of your anxiety.

Here are a few ideas, to give you a basic understanding of how questions help you sell, and how to handle your F2F appointments. A quick BASIC introduction to asking questions.

These techniques have worked very well for me, and have set me up for an easy close many times, that is smooth, and executed virtually without any resistance. In short; they make selling easy.

Would love anyone else's input as well.

So let's start with some ideas...

Upon arrival at your appointment, after you say hi, compliment his office, and warm up for a minute...You are there to consult, so you show interest and concern...

Okay Bob, just to get a little back ground information...


Im assuming you dont have anyone working on your site right now, is that correct?

Okay great, and...

Let me ask, I know you have probably gotten quotes before...
What has your experience been so far? Is there any particular reason you havent done this yet, if you dont mind my asking?

This kind of question does several things:

A: It gets him telling his horror story of how all the others tried to rake him over the coals, and that is something you can go on.

B: It gives you a chance to formulate a plan for how you are going to leverage those fears, and be the solution to all of those horrors



In this phase, follow along with him and agree with everything, maybe even giving your own examples of how others have had that happen, how they felt, what you did to help them, and how ridiculous it was of the other web company to do those things... Validate him. This is an excellent opportunity to create rapport.

For the most part , you are going to be saying alot of "Yeah , I understand, man I hate it when they do that...", as he tells you why he doesnt have a current website, and why he hasnt went along with any other quotes... Your validating him creates trust and a bond.

Remember, he is considering the benefits of working with you, and he wants to know that you are going to be on his side almost as much, or more, than he cares about you being a know it all.

If you dont fully disagree with the past salesman's logic, you may even say, "Well, I do understand why they do that, its because... but I dont do it quite that way because..."

In either event you are the opposite of whatever he had a problem with in the past. Allowing him to express this gives you AMAZING leverage if you handle it right.

On another note: He may not be so responsive as to talk a whole lot on this question, though most are VERY responsive, It may last five minutes, and it may last 20 seconds.

For example:

As opposed to having a big story, he may just be quick and say "Well I havent gotten around to it yet because I have so much on my plate".

Whatever it is, validate him, you understand, and thats why you always __________, and its just good that he's doing it now... (Let him know you assume he's ready now).

As he is telling his story,he is telling you how to sell him.

You are going to know why he has turned everyone else down, and you are going to know what will make him buy.

To Close on this first point:

The above initial question will warm up the meeting, and tell you what you need to know to sell this prospect, even if the answer is simply " I just havent gotten around to it".

***The point of asking this initial question is to help you to address, AHEAD OF TIME, any concern that might have been an objection in the past, and that might come up as an objection at your close.

Part of selling face to face is eliminating all the objections BEFORE you get to the close.

Moving on...

Now That You Have Validated Him, You Are Pals- More questions (pre objection stopper):


"Bob, just to give me an idea of what we are looking at, what is the price point of your average sale, if you dont mind my asking?

Great.

Okay thats good to know, this is already looking doable...


And, I know this is off the cuff, but if you could give me a ballpark; "How many quotes or consultations are you usually able to convert into sales on a normal basis? 1 out of three? One out of two?"

Okay that's good to know.


The above question not only tells him you have a mind for profit (without your having said it) , but was a pre objection stopper, in that it helps you ensure that price doesn't make sense to argue later.

You now know ahead of time what he needs to achieve a positive ROI , and he knows you know, and you can now address that in your close before the price objection comes up, to make sure that there is no valid price objection at the end of your pitch.

Again we are always eliminating objections BEFORE the close. This is what is meant by "ABC-Always Be Closing", if you ever wondered.

To recap:

If you have established, ahead of time, that it only takes a couple of sales for him to achieve a positive ROI based on your cost, then he cant reasonably say "It costs too much" at the end of your pitch, because clearly its all profit even if he just got a few sales..., and he will already have admitted that even a few would make this worth it.

So this question is a valuable tool in helping you close a sale smoothly.

Now onto another type of question: "assumptive questions".

Bob before we get too far into this, let me ask you some questions about your design...

What are you needing your site to do, just get people to contact you about free consultations so you can quote them and sell them your service?

Great, well thats easy enough.

And , did you want an interactive contact form on your site where customers can contact you, or did you just want to list a phone number?

Okay.

And....

" did you have a logo already that you want us to use on your site, or will be needing us to create one for you"?


Any particular colors you want for your site?


Note To Warriors- Do you see how this is tying him down?

No?

I will show you.

These are "assumptive" questions. Every time he answers one of these he further commits himself into the natural conclusion of closing at the end of the presentation, because the way you are asking is like he is already closed.

Its like he is saying little yesses, and agreeing to certain design elements... ahead of time. ("ABC")

In effect: To change his mind at the end, and suddenly say he doesnt want all these things that he said he wanted earlier, almost subconsciously makes him a liar. So these assumptive design oriented questions tie him down to the close.

It also helps you gauge where he is at emotionally throughout your pitch. The more he responds to assumptive questions, and the more he is engaged by them, the closer he is to closing...again; you are "tying him down".

Later at the end, before you close him, its like "okay you want black and red, you want a contact form, you want this, you want that... Did I leave anything out?"

Here are some more tie down questions to drive the point home:

Did you want live chat on your site also , or do you want to be more hands off and just have people fill out the forms?

Okay, what email address do you want your forms sent to...?


Okay great...

And again, you did say that your average sale is around $xxx correct?

Okay great, just making sure.


Now you have him in the groove of answering assumptive questions

You have tied him down several times committing him into the sale, and making him a part of the creation process of the new site...you have gotten him excited about the possibilities of people filling out contact forms... He has even told you what email address he wants them sent to!

So lets start pre-closing...


Now Bob what are going to do is this...

**Tell him what you are going to do. This is where you explain your product and what you are going to do for him.

Add your own offer details to this part (I dont know them). Remember, this is not "What we do..." it is rather "What we are going to do for you". Big difference.

You have assumed him to this point, dont stop now. Be sure and line out all of the features and benefits of what you offer.

Click here for a short lesson on that.

Now, another reminder question before quoting price:

Now, again, you said that your average point of sale is $XXX and that it usually takes three inquiries to produce a customer , so its looking like it would only take less than a sale a month to make sure you achieve a positive ROI, which is good. I like dealing with these kinds of numbers..."It's not like doing a site for a convenience store that sells three dollar items and takes a million customers per month to profit...lol". This should be pretty easy.

Frankly Bob, based on what I see here, profiting should not be an issue at all... (Paint a picture)

Now as far as price...

Most companies charge $xxxx just for the ________ alone, however, what I am going to do for you today is go ahead and just charge you $xxx for the___________ and I will go ahead and waive the cost of the________ altogether just for giving me the chance to earn your business, and because I think this is going to be an easy, no brainer project, would that help you out?

Great.

So what have here is

A:
B:
C:
D:

and we are throwing in __________ for free, so your total cost is going to come to only XXX today, and that includes 7 day per week access to our customer service department should have any concerns at any time... , fair enough?

Great.

Sounds good. Glad to have you onboard! (Keep assuming).

Oh BTW, I forgot to mention, you also get a hundred dollars worth of free google pay per click advertising to get you started receiving visitors immediately, so there's another bonus!

Now re assure, and comfort him before you ask for billing info.

Now Bob, you have my number if any concerns or questions arise between now and then..., let me give you my email address too, in case you want to shoot me an email instead. thats going to be...

Got it? Okay good.

After our meeting today, once I get back to the office, I am going to go ahead process your order to get your project started, and send you an email to recap and let you know the status of your site. Whats a good email address to send that to?

Okay, great. You should be getting that within a couple of hours after our meeting here.

Now close him:

Now as far as billing is concerned...we usually prefer to do business by checks, but I can take a visa or mastercard card as well, which one of those is going to work best for you today?

(Now Be Quiet and wait for him to dig it out).

Great.


Let him hand you a check, and BAMM, you have a sale!


So....

You can make up your own questions, fill in the blanks with your own offer details and prices, you may not ask them in this order...but this is a good example of how questions can sell, and I just wanted to put it here to give people some ideas to work with.

Asking good questions cuts out half your work of selling, and gets the customer selling themselves, so it winds up in a smooth transition to closing, with fewer, if any, objections. If done right, using proper questioning, closing is the natural conclusion to the meeting and not a hard core head butting contest..

Questions can paint pictures, act as pre objection stoppers, give you information about what the guys hot buttons are, help you look interested and concerned for his needs, attentive... tie the prospect down to where he has practically agreed way before the close...they are the perfect way to sell.

If you are bold enough to be assumptive, you will be shocked to know that most prospects will never question you , they will just answer over and over, and tie themselves down further and further throughout your pitch, where they would almost make themselves a liar to back out at the end, and closing seems like the natural next step.

Hope this helps someone.

-John Durham
#examples #questions #sell
  • Profile picture of the author d1ey0u
    Very helpful and informative post, John. Thanks!
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    • Profile picture of the author John Durham
      Originally Posted by d1ey0u View Post

      Very helpful and informative post, John. Thanks!
      No prob, I noticed some people saying they had no trouble making appointments, but didnt know what to do when they got there. These techniques will make it easy to warm up and get your prospect doing half the selling for you!

      Within a few minutes you will feel comfortable and in control.

      There is the occasional unresponsive prospect who doesnt get moved on ANYTHING, but for the average one this stuff will get them involved and make you feel like you arent alone on a stage. It will be a co creation.
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  • Profile picture of the author d1ey0u
    I wish I read this before my first appointment. It went really bad. haha I'm starting to get better, and your sharing has opened my eyes even more!

    You said "There is the occasional unresponsive prospect who doesnt get moved on ANYTHING". I've had something like this happen before. Being new to this, it made me really uncomfortable and I nicely ended our meeting. 2 weeks later he calls me, and he's ready to get his website. How should someone like this be handled? Just move on to the next prospect?

    These questions can be used over the phone as well, right?
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    • Profile picture of the author John Durham
      Originally Posted by d1ey0u View Post

      I wish I read this before my first appointment. It went really bad. haha I'm starting to get better, and your sharing has opened my eyes even more!

      You said "There is the occasional unresponsive prospect who doesnt get moved on ANYTHING". I've had something like this happen before. Being new to this, it made me really uncomfortable and I nicely ended our meeting. 2 weeks later he calls me, and he's ready to get his website. How should someone like this be handled? Just move on to the next prospect?

      These questions can be used over the phone as well, right?
      d1ey0u,

      Great questions,

      Yes they can be used over the phone just as well, in fact sometimes better, because its sometimes easier to pull them off with a straight face if someone cant see your face.

      As far as unresponsive prospects, most of them are more interested in hearing what YOU have to say, so with a guy like that, ask the questions, and use the extra time, thats not being used listening to his responses, for the purpose of outlining features and benefits, and to educate.

      Try to get at least a short response either way. If he's still responding, you still have his attention, even if he isnt Mr. Personality. Not everyone is, right?

      Its a personality type, they are listening intently and not saying alot. These types are usually quick to make a decision either way, firmly and mean what they say...Its shocking how many of them just roll over and give you a check.

      Also, with these types just hit them with less personality yourself, in a more factual way, be more concise, because that's what they like. They are no bs, and when they say they are busting out a check book, they also arent bssing.

      Originally Posted by d1ey0u View Post

      2 weeks later he calls me, and he's ready to get his website.
      Lol. Typical.

      Now on the "prospecting" end...

      If it happens in your "prospecting" phase (which I will explain further down) then just go as far as you can in your pitch until they say they arent interested, which they may surprise you and NOT SAY at times...

      If you get any resistance in the prospecting (not selling) phase, offer a soft rebuttal such as "Okay you already have a website then? Great, the reason I asked is because..." , and if you get shunned a second time, just let them go. When "appointment setting", or "prospecting", you are trying to run numbers and dont have time to mess with people.

      Save your energy for people who are ready to be pitched.

      On that note:

      ALWAYS let someone go if they are just plain rude, you dont need to waste your positive energy butting heads with people. Even bless them under your breath and hope their day goes better as you hang up, because it will help you maintain your attitude of good will and keep your energy from going downhill for the next 20 calls.

      They
      may be a jerk, but you know that you are well intending, and dont have that energy yourself. It shifts the feeling back on them. Dont participate in the attitudes, or you will take on a cynical tone, and attitude, and that doesnt help EVER.

      Two Call Closes:

      Remember also that even with appointment setting, you can make PHONE appointments, not just face to face ones, and they are cool too because they give you a chance to look up the prospects keywords before you pitch and come in with some ammo...

      Here is what I mean by "Prospecting Phase" of "Phone Closing":

      In phone closing, its especially important to note the difference between "prospecting" and "selling", or else you will waste alot of energy.

      Separate the two processes.

      You arent "selling" until you have a prospect. So dont try to sell everyone you talk to...move along through the numbers prospecting, and stop to sell only when you have discovered that you have a "prospect" on the line.

      Just move along uncovering "prospects" divide the two in your mind "Selling/Prospecting".

      Most of your session will not be spent pitching, it will be moving through the numbers looking for a prospect, and pitching here and there as you uncover them.

      You wear yourself out and beat your head against rocks everyday if you think your job is to try and sell everyone, even when the goal is phone closing.

      You make much better use of your time and energy if you just dont give much out until you know you have a "prospect" on the line, THEN break out the sales energy.

      As someone mentioned before, prospecting should be zen and low key, even though you are dialing fast.

      Reserve your major sales energy until you have someone worth pitching on the line, or else you will get increasingly frustrated thinking you are "missing it", when in fact you are not missing it, you are just not pitching any real prospects...

      That feeling of "I'm missing it" will keep you from selling one when you actually DO come across a real prospect, as it builds up and affects your attitude and tone, so reserve that energy for when you feel you have uncovered one.

      Be happy knowing that you are just prospecting, you arent losing just because no one has said yes yet, and turn it on when you actually uncover one which will happen at various times in your session if you dont waste your attitude on the wrong people.

      You cant "count" everyone. Non prospects do not count as failed pitches, only as failure in recognizing who was pitchable, and thus pitching the wrong people, wasting your fuel.

      Zig Ziglar asks the question "Are you suspecting or are you prospecting?" Are you wasting all your energy on suspects instead of prospects?

      Thats the reason most people think they suck at sales because they dont know the difference and they pitch suspects all day, dont get anywhere, and think they are a failure. The first thing you need to do is quit counting suspects. They dont count. Let em go, dont think anything of it, and move on.

      Only prospects are sellable. If one is pitching suspects all day, no wonder they think they are failing.

      -John
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      • Profile picture of the author d1ey0u
        "You cant "count" everyone. Non prospects do not count as failed pitches, only as failure in recognizing who was pitchable, and thus pitching the wrong people, wasting your fuel.

        Zig Ziglar asks the question "Are you suspecting or are you prospecting?" Are you wasting all your energy on suspects instead of prospects?

        Thats the reason most people think they suck at sales because they dont know the difference and they pitch suspects all day, dont get anywhere, and think they are a failure. The first thing you need to do is quit counting suspects. They dont count. Let em go, dont think anything of it, and move on.

        Only prospects are sellable. If one is pitching suspects all day, no wonder they think they are failing."

        Sooo much good information!!! Not gonna lie... I'm actually excited to prospect next week. I can't wait to apply what I've learned!

        I love this forum!
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        • Profile picture of the author mak25
          Originally Posted by d1ey0u View Post

          Zig Ziglar asks the question "Are you suspecting or are you prospecting?" Are you wasting all your energy on suspects instead of prospects?

          Thats the reason most people think they suck at sales because they dont know the difference and they pitch suspects all day, dont get anywhere, and think they are a failure. The first thing you need to do is quit counting suspects. They dont count. Let em go, dont think anything of it, and move on.

          Only prospects are sellable. If one is pitching suspects all day, no wonder they think they are failing."
          This is a great post by you and one that newbs should understand immediately.

          It's not what you sell, but who you sell it to.
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      • Profile picture of the author Claude Whitacre
        Originally Posted by John Durham View Post

        Here is what I mean by "Prospecting Phase" of "Phone Closing":

        In phone closing, its especially important to note the difference between "prospecting" and "selling", or else you will waste alot of energy.

        Separate the two processes.

        You arent "selling" until you have a prospect. So dont try to sell everyone you talk to...move along through the numbers prospecting, and stop to sell only when you have discovered that you have a "prospect" on the line.

        Just move along uncovering "prospects" divide the two in your mind "Selling/Prospecting".

        Most of your session will not be spent pitching, it will be moving through the numbers looking for a prospect, and pitching here and there as you uncover them.

        You wear yourself out and beat your head against rocks everyday if you think your job is to try and sell everyone, even when the goal is phone closing.

        You make much better use of your time and energy if you just dont give much out until you know you have a "prospect" on the line, THEN break out the sales energy.

        As someone mentioned before, prospecting should be zen and low key, even though you are dialing fast.

        Reserve your major sales energy until you have someone worth pitching on the line, or else you will get increasingly frustrated thinking you are "missing it", when in fact you are not missing it, you are just not pitching any real prospects...
        -John
        John; Strong Strong Thread all the way throughout. I thank you.

        And your take on separating prospecting from selling is one of the most profitable pieces I've seen on the Forum.

        One thing I might add is not to downgrade something they bought earlier. I always find a way to compliment them on any previous purchase.
        "Buying is Good". And any buying decision they made in the past (even with competitors) is to be commended. Why? Because "They are smart buyers and I'm next"

        When building rapport, be careful not to fake interest in things you know nothing about. I tend to build rapport through the sales process, not as a separate step.

        Good stuff from a Master Craftsman. Thanks.
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  • Profile picture of the author Rearden
    Great presentation, John.

    When you understand the top reasons someone objects doing business with you today, and you prepare your questions thoughtfully to knock out future objections, you are on your way to sales success.

    John, how much emphasis do you put on initial rapport building? Some believe in it, some don't.
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    • Profile picture of the author John Durham
      Originally Posted by Rearden View Post


      John, how much emphasis do you put on initial rapport building? Some believe in it, some don't.
      Hi Reardon,

      Not alot honestly.

      Rapport is important, because people buy YOU as much as your product, but I dont spend a ton of energy trying to establish it in a overt way.

      Some rapport is built in the appointment setting stage... For the walk in part, I just walk in , say hi, great to me you, nice looking establishment you got here, is business pretty good?

      Or I might notice something specific that they obviously treasure, which reflects their personal taste (because rapport is personal), and comment on it, like a statue, or painting (if I know the artist) or something... to see if it gets them talking. It's especially good to ask a "question" about it.

      My old boss, for example, use to have a 5 foot tall bull statue next to his desk, and he loved to tell the story of it, and the meaning. That would get you some instant rapport asking about that, and admiring it.

      Rapport is built , IME, more by the kinds of questions you ask, and the answers you give, than the show you put on.

      If they have something unique in their office though, like my old boss, and you ask about it, thats a good way to get on their good side, by showing interest in it.

      Dont go too far though or they will see it as insincere.

      On the phone, if they have a unique business name, you might ask about it, or if they sell a unique product you might ask "What the heck gave you the idea to do this"...

      Anything you can note that's unique, ask about it, its probably their baby and they probably love to tell people about it.

      They read alot into the kinds of questions you ask. Thats how they determine whether they like you or not.

      This is just my own experience.

      Maybe you like their car... Maybe they love bragging about it... Who knows?

      Thats how you build rapport in my book.

      They will also determine by the little things you seem to understand about them, and what you agree and disagree with, throughout the presentation, as to whether they like you or not.

      If you dont see anything to comment on
      , just get down to business, they appreciate you taking your job seriously too. They may like you just because you are so focused at your job.

      Honestly, people dont put much stake in the front you put on, in my experience... they try to read in between the lines of what you are saying in your pitch to determine if they like the way you do business or not.

      They are always looking in between the lines, no matter what you say on the surface, so you have to "communicate" between the lines, and the way to do that is to ask questions and get an inside track on their thinking processes.

      Thanks for the great question. This is just my own way of establishing rapport. Its kind of wrapped into the presentation, or done by showing interest by asking about something unique or dear to them.

      I kinda do it more off the cuff, I dont have a one size fits all solution for that one.

      -John
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      • Profile picture of the author harryharris
        John

        Great post....well informed and practical - but you knew that!

        In my experience I also find this a great opener / question to be:

        "When we spoke the other day and you agreed to meet with me, it was because you thought to yourself: 'Great! Maybe, now we'll be able to fix the problem of ______!'

        "What was that [blank], what do you want me to fix [or what do you want me to help you achieve] today?"


        Always get's them talking and you find out where you need to focus your attention.

        He might say:

        "We have a website but no leads.../ My competition is doing all this Social Media stuff and I want to know what I need to do..."

        Some follow up questions might be.

        "Why is it so important that you fix that [the problem they tell you about]?"

        "What have you done in the past to try achieve / fix this?"

        "In your view why did it not work?"

        If the prospect says - "No I just wanted to hear what you had to say" - you need to do a better job of pre-qualifying your appointments!

        Like any conversation with a human being there are twists and turns, but your post has given a really good road map.

        Again great post!

        Harry T
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        • Profile picture of the author John Durham
          Originally Posted by harryharris View Post

          John

          Great post....well informed and practical - but you knew that!

          In my experience I also find this a great opener / question to be:

          "When we spoke the other day and you agreed to meet with me, it was because you thought to yourself: 'Great! Maybe, now we'll be able to fix the problem of ______!'

          "What was that [blank], what do you want me to fix [or what do you want me to help you achieve] today?"


          Always get's them talking and you find out where you need to focus your attention.

          He might say:

          "We have a website but no leads.../ My competition is doing all this Social Media stuff and I want to know what I need to do..."

          Some follow up questions might be.

          "Why is it so important that you fix that [the problem they tell you about]?"

          "What have you done in the past to try achieve / fix this?"

          "In your view why did it not work?"

          If the prospect says - "No I just wanted to hear what you had to say" - you need to do a better job of pre-qualifying your appointments!

          Like any conversation with a human being there are twists and turns, but your post has given a really good road map.

          Again great post!

          Harry T
          Good stuff Harry, thanks for contributing!

          I think this thread is slowly becoming (with your help) about "How to get the prospect talking, or engaged".

          Because that is the best key to making effortless sales, if you can get the inside track of their mind, which is easy, by asking engaging questions.

          So many newbies are nervous about pitching, when really thats the easy part. Finding a "prospect" thats worth pitching is the harder part.

          They get the two processes confused and run them together... and they dont realize that they could be more successful if they understood that the no's in the prospecting aspect of sales dont really count as failures. Thats a different process from pitching.

          They also dont realize is that once you start asking questions and have some two way dialogue going with the prospect, pitching and closing is really easy.

          its not so hard to pitch when you arent on the stage alone. If you can get the prospect involved it becomes a team planning session- a co creation.

          You can still lead it to the solutions you offer, but you can get them to a place where YOUR solutions, are half THEIR idea.

          At least the half that identifies the needs for the solutions. People buy into things more when they are co creators of the idea.

          Thanks again,

          John
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  • Profile picture of the author mijagi
    Epic post. Thank you, John!
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  • Profile picture of the author kenmichaels
    He's baaaaack !!

    I like your take on rapport. Good stuff
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  • Profile picture of the author tryinhere
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    • Profile picture of the author David Miller
      John, this great information and it's evidence of your real world experience as opposed to armchair academic theory posed by so many others.

      To me, what the post spells out clearly is the need to know exactly what you need to say and when you need to say it when you are face to face with your prospect. In other words folks, what you have be handed is an ideal "script" to use when you are face to face with a prospect.

      Now the odds are that I may get some grief because I've used the word "script" and JD may not get the same grief because he didn't. But the bottom line is that if you find yourself unsure of what it is you should say, you can be nearly certain that you'll end up saying something that you shouldn't.
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      The big lesson in life, baby, is never be scared of anyone or anything.
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    • Profile picture of the author John Durham
      Originally Posted by tryinhere View Post


      ? why are you giving away stuff for free ? this is a common trap for new players in sales, they believe the only way to make a sale is to offer discounts and freebies ?
      My tendency is to give away free stuff that would have been included anyway, or something that virtually cost me nothing. It's about salemanship.

      Sam Walton use to say that you could sell a "comb" for ten cents but you could sell a "super detangler comb" for a dollar!

      So he just took "combs" and called them "super detangler combs".

      For instance...

      Rough Example:

      Our package includes:

      5 Professionally Designed Web Pages
      Up to 5 Photo's
      Customer Interactive Forms (as opposed to just calling it a "Contact form")
      SEO Optimization
      Professionally Written Website Content
      Custom Designed header...
      Professional search engine submission to all the major search engines...

      "Now as far as the search submission service (a few back links), that's something that usually costs over $200 in and of itself...but we are going to go ahead and throw that in for free..."

      Note to Warriors: Search engine submission is something that automatically happens when you upload their site and it gets crawled, but you might add a couple of optional back links by commenting on it at a forum somewhere or just about anywhere else online...(which costs you nothing to do, and helps the process of giving their site a little bit of extra ranking juice).

      Literally speaking, this is something you would probably do anyway, but you can call it a "search engine submission service" or whatever you want, built it up as a separate value in your presentation.

      This is where learning about how to sell features and benefits comes in. ( Click here for a short lesson on that )

      You can offer only a very few "features", but build their individual values in your presentation in numerous ways, by illustrating multiple benefits and the like, and thus sell more than someone who has alot of features and doesnt know how to build value and sell benefits.

      @ tryinhere,

      The SECOND level of "Oh btw the way...we are throwing in a $100 worth of Google advertising for free, so there's another bonus"...

      That is something that puts them over the top after they already see a ton of value, and are already sold on the value... It drives the final nail home.

      Its said after the value has been relayed already in an "oh ,by the way, matter of fact" kinda way because that's salesmanship.

      It is something you can afford to give for free, and is supposed to be given away for free anyway, as it is given to you for free by google for that very purpose.

      Giving away "free google advertising vouchers" offers your customers extra benefit (a bonus), and open the door for you to upsell pay per click services, which helps both you, and google, and hopefully your customer too.

      When you email them you can upsell them the optional service of setting up their google adwords account and running their $100 campaign for them professionally.

      I dont believe in giving away the farm... but I FIRMLY believe in leveraging every feature you offer, and building its value, calling it a super detangler comb.

      You dont have to offer any extra features to take one you already have and "throw it in for free".

      The search submission thing isnt to be taken literally necessarily , its just off the cuff an example of how you sell value.

      Originally Posted by tryinhere View Post

      no one likes to hear it will be a easy no brainier deal to sort.
      Actually when I take my guitar into the shop with what seems like a complex problem for me, thats EXACTLY what I want to hear them say. I will pay bigger for a guy who can handle my problems like they are nothing, is familiar with the solution, and immediately knows what to do without needing to think too hard...

      Same for goes my car.

      If a guy seems to concerned that its going to be a complex process, he scares me, and Im not sure if he's the guy who should be working on it. When someone tells me "this will be a no brainer for me", I feel confident.

      Originally Posted by tryinhere View Post

      people want to know that they have specific problems and you can take the extra detail and specifics to deal with their unique business problems your fixing, who wants to be just an easy run of the mill fix when they can feel special attention to their needs.
      Again, in the above scenario, we have already identified the unique thing they want to accomplish through questions... and yeah it builds confidence to know you are dealing with someone who knows the subject matter like the back of their hand and can pull it off like a no brainer without a hitch.

      They dont want you to reinvent the wheel, they want you to do something that works, that you are familiar with, can pull off confidently, and make it run like a clock with no complications.

      People dont believe in unique left field solutions, they want to know "whats commonly working for others, that is proven, and that will get me results".

      All this "highfalutin" talk is for people who read too much at the warrior forum. Seriously. It's why many arent experiencing high conversion.

      Note: Not saying thats "you", but you may be out there trying to use some of the techniques that some theorists teach here, and may be getting less than optimal results).

      Originally Posted by tryinhere View Post

      the chance to earn your business ? say what ? how about these people feeling special to even have your attention and are darn lucky to have your attention and you helping to fix their problems.
      As a matter of fact this is a HIGHLY CLASSIC, well known phrase to use, because it is proven, and has been effective for fifty years, in hundreds of different world renown sales presentations.

      Frankly, it is more strange to me that you havent ever heard of it, being a sales professional, than it is for you to hear me repeat it probably.

      Originally Posted by tryinhere View Post

      Sounds good. Glad to have you onboard! (Keep assuming).
      / ? very strange because if your saying great to have you on board you better not be assuming anything, they are or they are not ? probably need to be a lot straighter at this point and confirming a sale before calling that shot.
      Again, this being strange to you, illustrates a potential lack of experience at assumptive closing, and Im ninety percent sure any fulltime salesman on this forum would agree with me.

      Please dont be offended because Im not saying "I think you lack experience", but some of the things you are picking out sound like it ... at least at the assumptive style.

      The point here is to say "Glad to have you on board", BEFORE ASKING FOR BILLING INFO, so they assume you consider them a customer already, agreement wise, and it leads to a natural conclusion of them paying now.

      When they smile back at you like they are glad to have agreed, it re affirms to THEM that they are onboard (it's a final tie down), and that they HAVE agreed, resulting in less hesitation when you ask for the credit card.

      You are affirming to them that its a done deal, so in the next few lines there is nothing unnatural feeling when it comes to payment time.

      If you dont do these kinds of tie downs and affirmations, sometimes a customer will follow you all the way to the point when you are asking for the credit card, then suddenly they back out or put you off.

      Anybody that knows what Im talking about, feel free to chime in.

      This isnt like ad copy, its a real live flowing sales presentation, and managing the energy flow is a bit different.

      To wrap this post up...

      What I share here is not going to make grammatical sense sometimes to your intellectual side, because it comes from doing alot of closes, on the spot, in real time, which are more about flow than intellectualizing for both the customer and the salesman.

      The thing that counts most is that the techniques "work" in a live situation, and to most salesman these ideas arent strange at all.

      I havent said anything here that isnt classic sales knowledge.

      Hope my disagreement didnt offend in any way. Thanks for posting.

      Actually, it probably helped some more people who dont have experience with this type of selling to understand the OP, so, "double" thanks.

      For many it will make perfect sense.

      -John

      Originally Posted by David Miller View Post


      Now the odds are that I may get some grief because I've used the word "script" and JD may not get the same grief because he didn't.
      Lol David, yeah I dodged that bullet you can see!

      I guess you might call it a "pre-objection stopper"!

      Thanks for the kind words! Im glad you got it, and wouldnt expect anything less. I was figuring Claude would be the first, but it shouldnt surprise me that it was you. A true real world salesman of the finest variety.

      Glad to have you back by the way!

      Looking forward to more of your contributions!

      -John
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      • Profile picture of the author tryinhere
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        • Profile picture of the author John Durham
          Originally Posted by tryinhere View Post

          John my views were not to attack you but to give another side, but you seem to want to shoot down people who are doing this and offer up alternatives, well today I have another 3 leads so I will go and close those and get some more practice in.

          any great thread, for me back out into the real world very sorry I drop by here somedays now. all attack when you throw some stuff up it seems.

          I will leave thread for those who know what they are doing cheers.

          Actually I went out of my way not to personally attack while you were implying that I was ridiculous. If you reread my posts Im talking about the issue and explaining why the techniques work. Not attacking anyone.

          I didnt even say you lacked experience, only with this technique, and went out of my way to make that clear.

          However, if you reread your own posts, you will clearly see cynicism. Im sorry you feel offended by me, and sorry you are jabbing at anyone who supports my theories calling them "cheerleaders". They dont deserve the attack themselves. I dont see any good intentions here...

          You are generalizing about ALL my posts, when I "throw stuff up".... There just clearly arent any good intentions. Sorry if that is glaringly obvious.
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          • Profile picture of the author tryinhere
            Originally Posted by John Durham View Post

            However if you reread your own your will clearly see cynicism. Im sorry you feel offended by me, and sorry you are jabbing at anyone who supports my theories calling them cheerleaders. They dont deserve the attack themselves. I dont see any good intentions here...

            You are generalizing about ALL my posts, when I "throw stuff up".... There just clearly arent any good intentions. Sorry if that is glaringly obvious.
            Say what ? why am i offended by you John, all I done was offered a different view. now this / utter jibberish and non founded words jammed in at best?

            Well for me I am over the forum in many ways I have a good life and a quiet one / so for me I will call this a Russ Sells exit as well, I think this forum is not for me any longer.

            Best of luck to those starting out, for me I sold for 30 plus years have consistantly made 6 plus numbers but now I want 7 plus so I will not do that talking about it here.

            Enjoy, will drop back now and then, appologies to John, mate leave it to you to teach these people and wish you the best with it I am sure they appreciate your input and time.

            Many clever minds here and to those people your posts are a joy to read.

            Thanks
            Pete
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            | > Choosing to go off the grid for a while to focus on family, work and life in general. Have a great 2020 < |
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            • Profile picture of the author John Durham
              Originally Posted by tryinhere View Post

              Say what ? why am i offended by you John, all I done was offered a different view. now this / utter jibberish and non founded words jammed in at best?

              Well for me I am over the forum in many ways I have a good life and a quiet one / so for me I will call this a Russ Sells exit as well, I think this forum is not for me any longer.

              Best of luck to those starting out, for me I sold for 30 plus years have consistantly made 6 plus numbers but now I want 7 plus so I will not do that talking about it here.

              Enjoy, will drop back now and then, appologies to John, mate leave it to you to teach these people and wish you the best with it I am sure they appreciate your input and time.

              Many clever minds here and to those people your posts are a joy to read.

              Thanks
              Pete
              Pete, I am not sure where I offended you originally. I think it was weeks back...But Im sorry I do, sincerely. We use to have better rapport. Good luck to you as well. I cant help but think the tone of your posts suggests something deeper underlying.

              It's not somewhere I havent been with others, so I hope it passes. It usually does for me.

              Thank you for your well wishes,

              John
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              • Profile picture of the author tryinhere
                Originally Posted by John Durham View Post

                Pete, I am not sure where I offended you originally. I think it was weeks back...But Im sorry I do, sincerely.
                John let me be clear, you did not offend me in the past, nor have you offended me now. Best of luck moving forward.
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  • Profile picture of the author misterme
    Originally Posted by John Durham View Post

    we are always eliminating objections BEFORE the close. This is what is meant by "ABC-Always Be Closing", if you ever wondered.
    My definition of closing is "a commitment to the sale." So, to "always be closing" means to me to continually and progressively seek that commitment.

    And , did you want an interactive contact form on your site where customers can contact you, or did you just want to list a phone number?

    Okay.

    And....

    " did you have a logo already that you want us to use on your site, or will be needing us to create one for you"?

    Any particular colors you want for your site?

    Note To Warriors- Do you see how this is tying him down?

    No?

    I will show you.

    These are "assumptive" questions. Every time he answers one of these he further commits himself into the natural conclusion of closing at the end of the presentation, because the way you are asking is like he is already closed.
    Here are some more tie down questions to drive the point home:

    Did you want live chat on your site also , or do you want to be more hands off and just have people fill out the forms?

    Okay, what email address do you want your forms sent to...?

    Okay great...

    And again, you did say that your average sale is around correct?

    Okay great, just making sure.

    Now you have him in the groove of answering assumptive questions

    You have tied him down several times committing him into the sale, and
    I wouldn't call those tie downs, necessarily. And I'll tell you why.

    For the most part, the prospect's committing to a choice of what he wants, sure enough. But not a choice that irrefutably ties him down to doing that business with YOU.

    So a tie down that would do more of that kind of thing would be this:

    YOU: "did you have a logo already that you want us to use on your site, or will be needing us to create one for you"?

    PROSPECT: "I already have the logo designed."

    YOU: "So we're using your logo then for this, is that right?" (tie down)

    PROSPECT: "That's right."

    OR

    YOU: "did you have a logo already that you want us to use on your site, or will be needing us to create one for you"?

    PROSPECT: "I need to have the logo designed."

    YOU: "So we're designing your logo for this, is that right?" (tie down)

    PROSPECT: "That's right."

    It's like a confirming question after the prospect states a choice. That's what ties him down. Just gives it a leeeeetle bit more oomph getting an agreement in this way.

    Remember, this is not "What we do..." it is rather "What we are going to do for you". Big difference.
    At the risk of sounding like Emeril, we're gonna take this up a notch. "What we are going to do for you" becomes "Let's do this..." because now it's not you pitching what we're going to do, but instead, now the two of you are a team. And you're speaking as if you're a team. It's a joint cooperative project, you're both on board. That's what the language "let's do this..." infers.

    Bam.

    After our meeting today, once I get back to the office, I am going to go ahead process your order to get your project started, and
    See now, I wouldn't say that because I wouldn't want the prospect to think there's this sort of grace period between now and later when I finally process his order, in which maybe he feels he can cancel because the order hasn't been officially processed? I want him to feel I'm on the job right now.
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  • Profile picture of the author Rearden
    My father -- who consistently for 20 years sold millions in the chemical business through himself and via his sales force -- told me all sales is is answering objections.

    All these tie-downs, leading the prospect with yes-answers, etc., are just sales tactics. They are the 20% of being successful in sales.

    What accounts for the 80%? Timing... asking thoughtful questions (much like John has asked), and continuous, never-ending prospecting (even when you're pipeline is full and you're booked solid for weeks in advance).

    If I was training a new salesperson, my number one focus would be on him pounding the phone or walking in dead cold hundreds of times a week, sifting through suspects to find the few golden nuggets that are ready to close TODAY, and to begin building the pipeline of prospects that will turn hot over the next year.

    Additionally, I would have him learn his product inside-out. I'd have him understand why people buy my company's product, why they don't, and teach him how to ask pointed, open-ended questions, and teach my new sales person to talk about 20% of the time, and listen 80% of the time.

    All the tactics that most sales trainers like to focus on? That'd come later... AFTER the fundamentals are honed.
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    • Profile picture of the author Claude Whitacre
      Originally Posted by Rearden View Post

      My father -- who consistently for 20 years sold millions in the chemical business through himself and via his sales force -- told me all sales is is answering objections.
      I think I would like to meet your father. Sounds like an interesting guy.

      Originally Posted by Rearden View Post

      What accounts for the 80%? Timing... asking thoughtful questions (much like John has asked), and continuous, never-ending prospecting (even when you're pipeline is full and you're booked solid for weeks in advance).
      Yes. Everything comes after prospecting activity. All training, all technique, all closing skill is meaningless if there is not a steady stream of new prospects.

      Originally Posted by Rearden View Post

      If I was training a new salesperson, my number one focus would be on him pounding the phone or walking in dead cold hundreds of times a week, sifting through suspects to find the few golden nuggets that are ready to close TODAY, and to begin building the pipeline of prospects that will turn hot over the next year.
      Again, the backbone of any sales success. I couldn't agree more.

      Originally Posted by Rearden View Post

      Additionally, I would have him learn his product inside-out. I'd have him understand why people buy my company's product, why they don't, and teach him how to ask pointed, open-ended questions, and teach my new sales person to talk about 20% of the time, and listen 80% of the time.

      All the tactics that most sales trainers like to focus on? That'd come later... AFTER the fundamentals are honed.
      Sales trainers like to impart flashy techniques because they are impressive.
      "Knock on 50 doors today" isn't awe inspiring to most. But it's the beginning of success.

      When hiring and training reps, the one thing I looked for was willingness to prospect. I could train them on everything else, at least to a level where they were making a living. The second most important thing I looked for was strength. I mean a strong self image. They were going to have to deal with people that are ...well...less gifted than they are. So I want to see them in action.

      That's one of the major reasons a new guy would see me sell for a week (while they concentrated on prospecting). I wanted them to see that hard work pays. Sales are the normal result after a good presentation. And see that constant prospecting is part of what they do.

      The stuff we tend to talk about in the threads on answering objections, etc? That's the Master Class in selling. I don't expose reps to any of that for at least a year, and sometimes never.
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    • Profile picture of the author mak25
      Originally Posted by Rearden View Post

      My father -- who consistently for 20 years sold millions in the chemical business through himself and via his sales force -- told me all sales is is answering objections.

      All these tie-downs, leading the prospect with yes-answers, etc., are just sales tactics. They are the 20% of being successful in sales.

      What accounts for the 80%? Timing... asking thoughtful questions (much like John has asked), and continuous, never-ending prospecting (even when you're pipeline is full and you're booked solid for weeks in advance).

      If I was training a new salesperson, my number one focus would be on him pounding the phone or walking in dead cold hundreds of times a week, sifting through suspects to find the few golden nuggets that are ready to close TODAY, and to begin building the pipeline of prospects that will turn hot over the next year.

      Additionally, I would have him learn his product inside-out. I'd have him understand why people buy my company's product, why they don't, and teach him how to ask pointed, open-ended questions, and teach my new sales person to talk about 20% of the time, and listen 80% of the time.

      All the tactics that most sales trainers like to focus on? That'd come later... AFTER the fundamentals are honed.
      There are just sooooo many great, useful, intelligent posts on this thread.
      From misterme, Claude, JD, you know, all the usual suspects.

      But this post by Reardon, bolded by me (a tactic I stole from Claude ) is really where it all begins.

      Since I'm a phone guy, my day always has several hours of it prospecting by phone.
      Finding those who want/need what I offer, then visiting them to close the deal.

      But prospecting, far and away for me, is the meat and potatoes of my business.
      Keeping the ole pipline full, so I can play, eat and enjoy life.

      Great post.

      PS - Not sure if I found this on the WF, but it is perfect:
      Salesmanship Takes a Back Seat to Prospecting.
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      • Profile picture of the author John Durham
        Originally Posted by mak25 View Post

        misterme, Claude, JD, you know, all the usual suspects.
        The good thing is that there are alot of diverse people READING it and picking it up! For every hundred people that read a thread like this a few more light bulbs come on and a few more people realize they can achieve.

        That makes you proud to be a Warrior, and a part of everything it stands for.

        I remember back in 1999-2000 when I was forced into a booth selling websites, and shortly thereafter running an offline sales room, and was still very new to the internet, and ignorant...I would come home every night and read the Warrior forum so I could learn more about what we were selling, because it was the CUTTING edge of IM information...and it made me better at what I did.

        Such a proud thing to be one of the guys that creates that for others now.

        Was just learning about the internet then, had never even sent an email, and was selling websites while still learning what "yahoo" was...

        The value of that is that I learned from experience that you can sell websites, and even manage teams of people who do, even if you are internet illiterate practically, as long as you have a pitch and a product to represent...

        Now all these newbies come here wanting to learn to make money, and think they cant, because they have to be a rocket scientist... and because of that experience, I can be a part of showing them that they can, and they can smell the roses while they are running with them in hand...no need to "stop" in order to smell them.

        Very cool how things come full circle.

        Thank you Allen Says.
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  • Profile picture of the author John Durham
    Originally Posted by Claude Whitacre View Post

    John; Strong Strong Thread all the way throughout. I thank you.
    Aprreciate that Claude. You are very welcome. I hope it helps some people.

    Originally Posted by Claude Whitacre View Post

    And your take on separating prospecting from selling is one of the most profitable pieces I've seen on the Forum.
    I believe with all of my heart that learning to separate the two in your mind can really ease a lot of pressure. Much like “T.O’s” do.

    I learned in songwriting that its best to separate the “writer” from the “editor”. In other words, let yourself express freely for five pages… and don’t stop letting it flow, stopping and nit picking along the way.

    Let the “writer” get it all out without interruption. Then, let the “editor” take over at a different juncture, and nit pick the meter of all the lines, pilfer through the ones it likes, intellectualize what fits or doesn’t…and edit the writers five pages down to one page, 3 minute and twenty second song.

    Never let the two into the same room at the same time, for best results.

    Otherwise you get nowhere in the creative process, always being interrupted by the editor, and you stop the creative flow up to much, and lose inspiration, and think too hard during the creative process.

    There is a time for creating, and there is a time for editing. Writing a song has two separate processes, and so does sales.

    Kick the editor out of the room while the writer is expressing. Let him come in later, when its his turn.
    I think prospecting and selling works the same way. You have to separate the two processes in your mind, or you lose prospecting time and get hung up a lot, lose inspiration, energy, and miss a lot of potentially good “lines” or “opportunities”.

    Originally Posted by Claude Whitacre View Post

    One thing I might add is not to downgrade something they bought earlier. I always find a way to compliment them on any previous purchase.
    I think there are different operating systems that can work and this isn’t the only one by far. Usually when they talk about their last purchase, they were burned and it wasn’t a good experience.

    In my own mind you want to find out what that experience was that caused them to give up on having a website, and figure out how you can become the exact opposite in their mind of the person who burned them.

    However, you can lose weight by cutting our meat, and you can also lose it by cutting out everything BUT meat, so I think there are different operating systems , and yours would be just as effective.

    Originally Posted by Claude Whitacre View Post

    When building rapport, be careful not to fake interest in things you know nothing about. I tend to build rapport through the sales process, not as a separate step.
    Yeah that’s why I noted “Don’t go too far or you will appear insincere”. I also agree above that most of rapport building happens throughout the pitch. I don’t generally have trouble finding something to comment on that I find interesting. Heck, Im fascinated by the smallest of things personally, if they are unique!

    You certainly cant fabricate interest , people are smarter than that, and toio many times we see techniques that insult the prospects intelligence, which they are onto believe me (as we stated, they are naturally suspicious and trying to read between your lines)…but if you can find something that actually is worth comment, or that genuinely inspires your interest to any degree, it’s a good way to engage the prospect by asking about it.

    For example, walking in my old bosses office and seeing a 5 foot statue of a bull next to his desk is really something you want to comment on, or ask about, and it would open him up like crazy because he was so proud of it. He would instantly like you for bein interested, now your job is to “not blow the rapport”. lol

    Originally Posted by Claude Whitacre View Post

    Good stuff from a Master Craftsman. Thanks.
    Thanks Claude. I think when I first started talking about telemarketing I got so much “crud”, that I had to establish my authority on the subject in order to open people up to listen, and maybe went overboard with that. Im trying these days to find better wys to communicate on the subject, and not so much to try and establish my authority talking about all the amazing experience along the way. I hope that is coming across, and is more helpful.

    Originally Posted by misterme View Post

    My definition of closing is "a commitment to the sale." So, to "always be closing" means to me to continually and progressively seek that commitment.

    I wouldn't call those tie downs, necessarily. And I'll tell you why.

    For the most part, the prospect's committing to a choice of what he wants, sure enough. But not a choice that irrefutably ties him down to doing that business with YOU.

    So a tie down that would do more of that kind of thing would be this:

    YOU: "did you have a logo already that you want us to use on your site, or will be needing us to create one for you"?

    PROSPECT: "I already have the logo designed."

    YOU: "So we're using your logo then for this, is that right?" (tie down)

    PROSPECT: "That's right."

    OR

    YOU: "did you have a logo already that you want us to use on your site, or will be needing us to create one for you"?

    PROSPECT: "I need to have the logo designed."

    YOU: "So we're designing your logo for this, is that right?" (tie down)

    PROSPECT: "That's right."

    It's like a confirming question after the prospect states a choice. That's what ties him down. Just gives it a leeeeetle bit more oomph getting an agreement in this way.
    Nice. Perfect actually.

    I was just skimming the subject and you are right, the tie downs exemplified in the OP should have been a lot stronger I agree. You expanded on them with excellence. This was really good. You actually inspired me to start a whole other thread on that subject specifically. Thanks for this.

    Someone else in the other thread is calling them “trial closes” or “Milestone commitments, which even gives it MORE meaning. So I think we have opened up a topic here that is really worthwhile, and I appreciate you expounding on it in a most excellent way.

    Using the term “Milestone Commitments” , as opposed to “Tie Downs” (Thanks Liz) really exemplifies the meaning of “Always Be Closing” to me. It means that in every phase of your pitch you are consciously thinking of the close and deliberately moving things in that direction.

    It took me years of selling to really understand what ABC meant. I hope these ideas help speed up the process of others getting a natural understanding of what that means in practice.

    Originally Posted by misterme View Post

    At the risk of sounding like Emeril, we're gonna take this up a notch. "What we are going to do for you" becomes "Let's do this..." because now it's not you pitching what we're going to do, but instead, now the two of you are a team. And you're speaking as if you're a team. It's a joint cooperative project, you're both on board. That's what the language "let's do this..." infers.
    Go for it Emeril!

    Yes, you did take it up a notch! Let’s take it even further and make it a tie down “Let’s do this! Sound good to you Bob?”

    People don’t like ideas forced on them, and people are more committed to ideas that they feel they are co creators of. So I agree, you took it up a notch here!

    Both ways will work, but some ways are more optimal. I like your approach here. It makes sense on many different levels.

    Originally Posted by misterme View Post

    See now, I wouldn't say that because I wouldn't want the prospect to think there's this sort of grace period between now and later when I finally process his order, in which maybe he feels he can cancel because the order hasn't been officially processed? I want him to feel I'm on the job right now.
    Again, I am basically going off the cuff to present a general idea, and others are adding more specificity, this is what I would do in a sales situation, because I do these things from habit and don’t intellectualize a lot. For me its about “flow”… and it works, however I appreciate your thoughts here.

    Thanks for your contributions. Yes I do think you took my OP up a notch, most definitely. I am only honored to have introduced the ideas on this thread, for guys like yourself to come and expound upon. Please fell free to add more.

    That’s the idea! To help people and bring awareness.

    It could be more perfect, but overall I think the thread will have great value to anyone wanting to develop as a sales person and take it up a notch for themselves!

    In fact I think in general, the evolution of telemarketing dialogue on WF is taking a more advanced turn.
    Originally Posted by Rearden View Post


    What accounts for the 80%? Timing... asking thoughtful questions (much like John has asked), and continuous, never-ending prospecting (even when you're pipeline is full and you're booked solid for weeks in advance).
    This may be the single most valuable nugget here.

    There is one easy way to not feel or come off desperate in your appointments… By having 5 more lined up back to back, so that your whole world doesn’t hang on this sale going through.

    People used to ask me how to not look desperate in their meetings. My answer is always. “don’t BE desperate”. Have enough meetings booked at all times, that you can be casual in each one and REALLY take on the disposition of not needing the sale.

    Why don’t you need this sale to close that bad? Because you have five more people waiting to talk to you…

    Pipeline. Keep it stuffed. The number one issue people have is that they don’t have enough appointments booked to even get any momentum to learn how to sell. Keeping yourself booked with appointments, through prospecting is the number one, single most important thing you can do, and it must ALWAYS be that way. Always keep the pipeline stuffed before anything else.

    Much like “Being a web designer” isn’t a business in itself unless you have “SALES” going on.

    Business isn’t about the product, its about sales… and sales is about having plenty of prospects lined up at all times.

    Good thought Reardon. Thanks! Keep that pipline stuffed.

    Here’s some Zig on the subject: (Sooo Important).


    Thanks guys!

    This is a great thread for advanced thinking on developing as a closer! Al;l the experienced guys here chiming in who knopw how to do it in the real world have so much valuable knowledge to share.

    While everones input is valuable, and all the contributors here are valuable team members, I want to particularly say again that its good to see the prodigal son David Miller back! I encourage newbies to read every post he makes as well as posts from all the other contributors on this thread, we have a real concentrated group of real world sales pro's here.

    Not just copy writers. These guys have paid the dues, pounded the pacvement, arent talking theory, and can really tell you what really happens in a real live sales situation.

    There isnt any guile in this thread, which is rare. I am honored at these sales pro's participation.

    -John
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  • Profile picture of the author tiny1
    John,

    Once again, you've made a great thread with great value. I think all of us here would be wishing we could extract your knowledge and make some sort of an Offline Marketing bible with it, haha. A chapter a day and I'd be off to marketing nirvana.
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  • Profile picture of the author ownergolan
    Great input, thank you !
    Signature
    "Aiyyo I'm gonna be on ti-dop, that's all my eyes can see..
    Ill put in work, and watch my status escalate"
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  • Profile picture of the author Rearden
    Threads like this remind me of some of the things I forgot when I was a newbie.

    When I first started my personal training business 6 years ago, I started pre-qualifying warm leads I generated through my advertisements before seeing them in person, before I even knew what "pre-qualifying" meant.

    And I remember being extremely concerned about what I was doing, whether or not I was scaring away prospects by giving information, or if I was doing something wrong, as I was breaking the appointment-setting rules given to me by a personal trainer sales coach.

    I would give a price range and ask if they were comfortable with that in their budget before setting the appointment.

    Back then I probably had a 95% appointment show rate (where they actually came to my office -- compared to the 70% to 80% show rate I have now going to people's homes to sell life insurance).

    My close rate was around 75% to 80% of all appointments, over that 5 year period I sold personal training. Compared to 25% to 30% of all appointments for selling life insurance nowadays.
    Signature
    David Duford -- Providing On-Going, Personalized Mentorship And Training From A Real Final Expense Producer To Agents New To The Final Expense Life Insurance Business.
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    • Profile picture of the author hypnopotomus
      This is absolute gold. I'm at this exact stage of meeting people face to face and this is a system I'm going to learn inside out. Super stuff, most relevant thing I've read on the warrior forum ever.
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  • Profile picture of the author moneyman2010
    Nice Post..Appointment setting is one of the ways i built my offline business.Most people are fearful of making cold calls but it's one of the fastest ways to get new clients!
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