"Everything looks good, but I have to check my budget / cash flow first..." REBUTTAL?

by ej155
50 replies
This is exactly what a prospect told me today on a 1st face to face meeting at her office.

She did seem genuinely interested (Website redesign / SEO). When I asked her which package (of the 3) she would like to go with today, she said she like the silver package.

However, I'm not sure if I didn't make the transition right in asking for the money, she said she needs to double check her cash flow in the business now before making a decision because it's an off season.

My money line was basically something like, "to get started, all I need from you is a cheque for the website and setup fee." Then she hesitated and gave me that line.

Then I tried to give her the "Feel, Felt, Found" thing where I understand how she feels and many others have felt the same, but I've found those who put it off never end up doing anything and weeks later their site is still bad and they're still not getting business online.

And I even tried the John Durham technique of giving her an option to pay just $500 up front (fully refundable) if she decides later that she didn't want it, just to get her to commit, but that didn't do anything either.

I can see that she felt tension/pressure at this point, so I asked her if there're any other questions she had for me and she said none but just to think about it and check the budget.

And so she told me to "call her Thursday" to give me a "yes or no".

So my question to all you warriors:

What would you have done?

Would you have given more rebuttals than what I've done?

How can I improve a similar situation in the future to CLOSE AT THAT 1ST MEETING?
#closing #objection #rebuttal #sales
  • Profile picture of the author Jason Kanigan
    Not bad; at least you got the Thursday deadline.

    Earlier on in the process, you could have said, "Have you thought about a budget for this project?" And if she answered, "No," you could have replied, "Well, for projects like yours, the budget typically ranges between $X and $Y." And watched her reaction.

    "Oh that's too much" is knee-jerk reaction. Meaningless. Compared to what?

    But if you can show her your site will make her 2x$Y or 5x$Y a month, why wouldn't she go for it?

    Now you want to watch for people who have no money. Don't get involved with them.
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    • Profile picture of the author ej155
      Originally Posted by Jason Kanigan View Post

      Not bad; at least you got the Thursday deadline.

      Earlier on in the process, you could have said, "Have you thought about a budget for this project?" And if she answered, "No," you could have replied, "Well, for projects like yours, the budget typically ranges between and ." And watched her reaction.

      "Oh that's too much" is knee-jerk reaction. Meaningless. Compared to what?

      But if you can show her your site will make her 2x or 5x a month, why wouldn't she go for it?

      Now you want to watch for people who have no money. Don't get involved with them.
      Thanks to your help Jason, I was able to get this meeting through cold calling!
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  • Profile picture of the author maxrezn
    Sounds like you didn't really sell her and she just used a very soft rejection. Anyways, you can add a verbal contract into your presentations.

    Something along the lines of: "Now Mr. Prospect, before I tell you how we can fix these issues....I'd like to ask you a for a simple favor. When it comes time for you to evaluate if what I have to offer is for you or not, all I ask for is your honesty in the form of a simple answer of Yes or No. If something doesn't appeal to you, just let me know I promise I won't be upset or offended."
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    • Profile picture of the author ej155
      Originally Posted by maxrezn View Post

      Sounds like you didn't really sell her and she just used a very soft rejection. Anyways, you can add a verbal contract into your presentations.

      Something along the lines of: "Now Mr. Prospect, before I tell you how we can fix these issues....I'd like to ask you a for a simple favor. When it comes time for you to evaluate if what I have to offer is for you or not, all I ask for is your honesty in the form of a simple answer of Yes or No. If something doesn't appeal to you, just let me know I promise I won't be upset or offended."
      Maybe I didn't get her to "get to the truth" in terms of what her real objections are. I agree if she is completely sold, she would look more excited.

      Hey Max, you've been a great inspiration on this forum.

      How do you personally "sell/build value" for your offline clients for web designs/seo related services?
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  • Profile picture of the author kenmichaels
    check out this thread on tie downs, it might help.

    If you don't get them to commit, there really is no sense to ask for the money.

    There are a also few threads in here on closing as well.
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    Selling Ain't for Sissies
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    • Profile picture of the author ej155
      Originally Posted by kenmichaels View Post

      check out this thread on tie downs, it might help.

      If you don't get them to commit, there really is no sense to ask for the money.

      There are a also few threads in here on closing as well.
      Ken I've actually read that thread in detail before and I've tried to get some tie-downs along the way too like asking her what she'd want me to put on her website, and she did tell me. Your aggressive approach is an eye opener as well

      I don't think my biggest problem is the actualy closing (although it needs to be worked on), but the bigger problem is how to get them EXCITED THROUGHOUT the entire meeting/presentation - basically SELLING THEM.

      How do you personally sell offline services that make them WANT TO CLOSE THEMSELVES? :rolleyes:
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  • Profile picture of the author Michael Nguyen
    Although we all try to close on the 1st meeting, it's just part of the game, you just can't always close on first go. From my limited sales experience, I think you approached it well and giving the prospect time to think is better than being a high pressure salesman/woman.

    If they know they want the product/service but still not deciding then you may need to throw in your money back gaurantee so there is less risk on them.

    I say to clients, "you get your money back what I would have kept as profit if you're not happy with the service"

    Another reason for them to sign up with you.
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    • Profile picture of the author Michael Nguyen
      Originally Posted by Michael Nguyen View Post

      Although we all try to close on the 1st meeting, it's just part of the game, you just can't always close on first go. From my limited sales experience, I think you approached it well and giving the prospect time to think is better than being a high pressure salesman/woman.

      If they know they want the product/service but still not deciding then you may need to throw in your money back gaurantee so there is less risk on them.

      I say to clients, "you get your money back what I would have kept as profit if you're not happy with the service"

      Another reason for them to sign up with you.
      Knowing what I know now, I'm embarrassed with the advice I gave back then. Today's advice would be to have an arsenal of closing material.

      "I understand you have to consider cash flow and budget. Every customer I speak too has a budget problem but they still find a way. Let's do this"

      "Let's do this now, you're gonna do this sooner or later, lets not lose time because I'm going to take care of you"

      Have so much in you're pipeline that youre willing to take her all the way. Meaning be willing to lose the deal. This mean close hard and stay in the close until she buys or tells you to duck off.

      Also should have qualified her timing to buy to make the meeting easier while you build more pipeline
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  • Profile picture of the author Eddie Spangler
    Man oh Man , If you are dealing with a typical small business and you ask them to make a commitment for a few hundred dollars and they come with the budget BS then you didnt excite them enough.

    These guys have NO BUDGETS , they buy what they are motivated to buy.

    They knew coming in that you were going to ask for money, you show them something worth multiples of your fee and you are willing to work with them on the payment and they still feed you that line of crap...something went wrong WAYYY before the rebuttal.
    Signature
    Promise Big.
    Deliver Bigger.
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    • Profile picture of the author ej155
      Originally Posted by Eddie Spangler View Post

      Man oh Man , If you are dealing with a typical small business and you ask them to make a commitment for a few hundred dollars and they come with the budget BS then you didnt excite them enough.

      These guys have NO BUDGETS , they buy what they are motivated to buy.

      They knew coming in that you were going to ask for money, you show them something worth multiples of your fee and you are willing to work with them on the payment and they still feed you that line of crap...something went wrong WAYYY before the rebuttal.
      I see where you're coming from Eddie, I think I still have much to learn in selling.

      I've done a "conservative growth projection" based on Google searches and have THEM come up with the potential numbers like CTR, Calls, Closing ratio. And based on HER projection numbers, we arrived at a six figure annual growth projection for her business.

      Then I paused and asked her, what do you think about that and if she had any questions. And that's when she said I'm wondering how much.

      And then I try to close and ask for the money and she gave me the line...
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      • Profile picture of the author Jason Kanigan
        Originally Posted by ej155 View Post

        I see where you're coming from Eddie, I think I still have much to learn in selling.

        I've done a "conservative growth projection" based on Google searches and have THEM come up with the potential numbers like CTR, Calls, Closing ratio. And based on HER projection numbers, we arrived at a six figure annual growth projection for her business.

        Then I paused and asked her, what do you think about that and if she had any questions. And that's when she said I'm wondering how much.

        And then I try to close and ask for the money and she gave me the line...
        Something is missing in her mind about the value, then. Maybe she doesn't believe her projections.

        Maybe she has cashflow problems and isn't a good fit.

        If this happens, I ask: "Oh. Wait. I'm confused. I thought you said the revenue growth from implementing this would be $X. Right? So at an investment of $Y, that's a return of %, isn't it?" And then dead silence.

        What pops out of the prospect is usually quite informative.
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        • Profile picture of the author ej155
          Originally Posted by Jason Kanigan View Post

          Something is missing in her mind about the value, then. Maybe she doesn't believe her projections.

          Maybe she has cashflow problems and isn't a good fit.

          If this happens, I ask: "Oh. Wait. I'm confused. I thought you said the revenue growth from implementing this would be . Right? So at an investment of , that's a return of %, isn't it?" And then dead silence.

          What pops out of the prospect is usually quite informative.
          I'm going to try this on Thurs when I call her if the situation fits, thx again Jason!

          Btw, doing that growth projection thing I learned from you too! lol
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  • Profile picture of the author PanteraIM
    The prospect was likely not just objecting to the price but probably a whole lot of other hidden factors.

    I would have first clarified if price was her only concern as she may have other issues in her mind that she is reluctant to tell you.

    I would then resell her on the benefits and value of what she's getting and contrast it against the cost of not going ahead.

    But the sales process needs to be follow properly in its' proper sequence for a sale to go ahead, you may have missed something way before you even got to the close, it's just not how it works.

    Good work anyway, if you can learn from this you'll be making lots of sales
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    • Profile picture of the author ej155
      Originally Posted by PanteraIM View Post

      The prospect was likely not just objecting to the price but probably a whole lot of other hidden factors.

      I would have first clarified if price was her only concern as she may have other issues in her mind that she is reluctant to tell you.

      I would then resell her on the benefits and value of what she's getting and contrast it against the cost of not going ahead.

      But the sales process needs to be follow properly in its' proper sequence for a sale to go ahead, you may have missed something way before you even got to the close, it's just not how it works.

      Good work anyway, if you can learn from this you'll be making lots of sales
      Mind sharing your own "sales sequence" that has worked for you? Thanks!
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      • Profile picture of the author PanteraIM
        Originally Posted by ej155 View Post

        Mind sharing your own "sales sequence" that has worked for you? Thanks!
        How many books on selling have you read?

        Any book on sales will take you thru the right sequence in selling.

        Or maybe you'd like some audio or video?

        To be honest though, this kind of stuff happens to me all the time. Prospects are weird sometimes and often it's impossible to find out why they won't buy from you if they don't tell you.

        It's kind of like trying to figure out why a girl rejected you/doesn't like you. There could be a million reasons or just a couple, the solution is always to keep your pipeline full of prospects so these sorts of occurances have less of an effect on your business.

        My advice is to learn from it and go call someone else, it's the only way you can move forward )
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        • Profile picture of the author ej155
          Originally Posted by PanteraIM View Post

          How many books on selling have you read?

          Any book on sales will take you thru the right sequence in selling.

          Or maybe you'd like some audio or video?

          To be honest though, this kind of stuff happens to me all the time. Prospects are weird sometimes and often it's impossible to find out why they won't buy from you if they don't tell you.

          It's kind of like trying to figure out why a girl rejected you/doesn't like you. There could be a million reasons or just a couple, the solution is always to keep your pipeline full of prospects so these sorts of occurances have less of an effect on your business.

          My advice is to learn from it and go call someone else, it's the only way you can move forward )
          I know there's another thread on the WF about books people recommend and I put on hold one of those at my library too. Just wondering do you have any special ones that you recommend?
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          • Profile picture of the author PanteraIM
            Originally Posted by ej155 View Post

            I know there's another thread on the WF about books people recommend and I put on hold one of those at my library too. Just wondering do you have any special ones that you recommend?
            Everything by Brian Tracy I can recommend, especially the Psychology of Selling.

            Also look at the Psychology of Achievement & the Psychology of Success.

            Knowing how to focus, set goals, time manage is as important as knowing how to sell because they're all interrelated. These books/audio will teach you how to do all that.
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  • Profile picture of the author bizgrower
    Maybe she just wants to talk to her spouse?
    Even if she is the decision maker in her business,
    it's still "their" money and that's just how a lot of couples work.

    Dan
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    "If you think you're the smartest person in the room, then you're probably in the wrong room."

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  • Profile picture of the author Slave1
    Perhaps this is her way of "asking" for a discount. I know some clients may not be brave enough to to straight out ask, so they stall in hopes that you chop the price.

    Don't chop the price unless you take something out of the project, or get something in return. You can't go to Best Buy and look at a $1,000 plasma and say, "oh, I really only can spend $750..." and expect them to just drop the price.

    Just my feedback
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    • Profile picture of the author Jason Kanigan
      Originally Posted by Slave1 View Post

      Perhaps this is her way of "asking" for a discount. I know some clients may not be brave enough to to straight out ask, so they stall in hopes that you chop the price.

      Don't chop the price unless you take something out of the project, or get something in return. You can't go to Best Buy and look at a $1,000 plasma and say, "oh, I really only can spend $750..." and expect them to just drop the price.

      Just my feedback
      Yup. "Sure, we can lower the investment. ...what features do you want to cut?"
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    • Profile picture of the author mojo1
      Originally Posted by Slave1 View Post

      Perhaps this is her way of "asking" for a discount. I know some clients may not be brave enough to to straight out ask, so they stall in hopes that you chop the price.

      Don't chop the price unless you take something out of the project, or get something in return. You can't go to Best Buy and look at a $1,000 plasma and say, "oh, I really only can spend $750..." and expect them to just drop the price.

      Just my feedback


      This Video highlights your point precisely.


      The Vendor Client relationship - in real world situations - YouTube
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  • Profile picture of the author sniper2009
    I donot love to see women do any business
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  • Profile picture of the author TeamBringIt
    If a businesses owner is not going to bite at your offer: You are either...
    1. You are targeting the wrong type of business ( very frugal and doesn't like to spend money)
    2. You did not convince them enough to take action and agree with you on a deal


    Picking businesses that spend money and not being frugal is what I would go after

    You already have won, half the battle there..now just make sure to fully convince them (provide gazillion benefits) and you should get more positive results...
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    • Profile picture of the author ej155
      Originally Posted by TeamBringIt View Post

      If a businesses owner is not going to bite at your offer: You are either...
      1. You are targeting the wrong type of business ( very frugal and doesn't like to spend money)
      2. You did not convince them enough to take action and agree with you on a deal


      Picking businesses that spend money and not being frugal is what I would go after

      You already have won, half the battle there..now just make sure to fully convince them (provide gazillion benefits) and you should get more positive results...
      Jay how do you personally stack your benefits?
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      • Profile picture of the author TeamBringIt
        Originally Posted by ej155 View Post

        Jay how do you personally stack your benefits?
        Look..i'll put it this way...I chat with my dermotologist every..now and then and he says that ALL he cares about is results, no promises but results...

        Take proven results with you, to the clients that have money to spend. ASK them, if their advertising budgets are being wasted... If the business owner spends tons of money, on marketing that bring in crappy results, then you come in and show proof that your style of marketing-- has brought in xxx amounts of dollars for past clients.

        Business owners want to see ROI and if you can show them ROI from other campaigns/clients then he or she would be, dumb to turn you away. They already know that they are losing money, so you would be a welcomed edition to their plan of attack.

        It's all about weeding out the poor businesses from the ones that have money and will spend at will.

        After your prospect these businesses, simply ask if they are spending tons of wasted money on advertising and if they are interested on saving money and getting better ROI, then contact YOU.

        Once they do that, they are open to seeing what you have to say and if you can prove to them RESULTS and not promises then, trust me you'll have a 70% + chance of getting them as a client.
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  • Profile picture of the author PaulintheSticks
    I think she didn't have the guts to tell you she's not sold on either the projections or on your ability to deliver.
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  • Profile picture of the author Aaron Doud
    I wonder if you sold her on more than she can budget.

    In the B2B world you don't get this as often but when selling cars or RVs you do.

    You sell them so well on that perfect car that they can't bring themselves to admit they can't afford it. So to save face they buy the Focus down the road vs. the Sonic you have because you sold them too well on the Volt.

    Sometimes when you get a price objection it really is a price objection. But the only one who can know that is you because you were in the room with her.

    She committed to a yes or no date on Thurs. If you get the yes move forward. If you get the no and want to work with her ask her more about her budget (since that part of the interview of lacking it appears) and move forward with a package she can afford.

    The problem is if you sold her too well on why she needs the silver package she may not be willing to give up anything. In which case all you have done is sold her for a lower priced competitor who will build a package like your silver package but will hit her price point.

    This can be a danger of selling too well. That's why qualifying is so important. If you sell them the perfect solution but they can't afford it you have helped neither of you. You have wasted your time. Because if you had sold the less than perfect solution you could have gain a customer and over time built the client into the perfect solution via add ons paid for by the extra business you were bringing in the door.

    Also on another note I don't like pushy closes and IMO you went too pushy. There is a chance she would have said yes thurs and now will say no due to that.
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    • Profile picture of the author ej155
      Originally Posted by Aaron Doud View Post

      I wonder if you sold her on more than she can budget.

      In the B2B world you don't get this as often but when selling cars or RVs you do.

      You sell them so well on that perfect car that they can't bring themselves to admit they can't afford it. So to save face they buy the Focus down the road vs. the Sonic you have because you sold them too well on the Volt.

      Sometimes when you get a price objection it really is a price objection. But the only one who can know that is you because you were in the room with her.

      She committed to a yes or no date on Thurs. If you get the yes move forward. If you get the no and want to work with her ask her more about her budget (since that part of the interview of lacking it appears) and move forward with a package she can afford.

      The problem is if you sold her too well on why she needs the silver package she may not be willing to give up anything. In which case all you have done is sold her for a lower priced competitor who will build a package like your silver package but will hit her price point.

      This can be a danger of selling too well. That's why qualifying is so important. If you sell them the perfect solution but they can't afford it you have helped neither of you. You have wasted your time. Because if you had sold the less than perfect solution you could have gain a customer and over time built the client into the perfect solution via add ons paid for by the extra business you were bringing in the door.

      Also on another note I don't like pushy closes and IMO you went too pushy. There is a chance she would have said yes thurs and now will say no due to that.
      Aaron, as I found out today on the call, I think really it is the cash flow that is her problem. I reaffirmed that she wanted the service but are just strapped now. The 3 packages range from around 600 to 1500 to highest package.
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      • Profile picture of the author Aaron Doud
        Originally Posted by ej155 View Post

        Aaron, as I found out today on the call, I think really it is the cash flow that is her problem. I reaffirmed that she wanted the service but are just strapped now. The 3 packages range from around 600 to 1500 to highest package.
        Hopefully you can still close her. Sometimes though if the cash flow is that bad they may not be the best client since leads likely isn't their problem. When a business has low cash flow that means they are not making a profit. If they are losing money (did you find out?) they may never be able to pay.

        While I am glad it was just a cash flow issue as that shows your basic presentation was good. Thought as you said in another reply you learned some lessons to be better next time.

        Overall I was hopeful it was a cash flow issue for real to show people that sometimes the price objection is really a price objection. Normally you can tell it is really price when they agree your price is fair, have no objection, but can't afford.

        For example I could go into a dealership and they could easily sell me on a $100k or $200k sports car. I'd love a GTR or Mclaren. But I would have a price objection. I simply can't afford it. You could sell me a new GTR for $70k and I would not be able to buy it even though I know that price is great. Sometimes the perfect service or product isn't the right service or product. Sometimes you have to find the best fit which often fits the budget but doesn't hit every other need.

        With that said have you talked to her about taking a smaller package or doing a lesser service to get going and get cash flow into the business so she can do what you both know is the right package for her business?
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  • Profile picture of the author RedShifted
    It sounds to me like you rushed the sale.

    If there is one thing I learned in sales its that you should ALWAYS do a full pitch, and take your time to thoroughly explain the benefits of EVERYTHING you are offering.

    And throughout this you work on building a more personal type of rapport with the person. Don't be afraid to ask them some nonrelated questions. Questions that have NOTHING to do with what you are selling. I shows that you are inquisitive, and care more about people than "closing the deal".

    Act like a personable human being. You should come off like you actually like the person you're talking to. Something like "I always do that too". Really work on building that rapport. That will always lower resistance I have found.

    One more point I will add. My brother does sales training for a living. Now I'm not saying he is the best at what he does, but I think he is damn good. And I've learned a lot from him.

    When he trains guys, he says one of the most common problems they suffer from is rushing a sale. They come in, run their pitch, can't think of anything else to say, so they try to close too early. Before they even warm the prospect up.

    I've met a lot of good salesman in my industry, and all the good guys do the same thing. They stay with the prospect for as long as possible. To do this properly, you have to have a million and 1 positive things to say about what you're selling. And in the course of this, you can go off on tangents building rapport with the prospect. This makes them like/trust you more, which makes them actually believe all the benefits you're offering them.

    Closing time comes when you have explained every benefit that there is to explain about what you're selling. If you haven't done that, then you should not try closing.

    I'd be curious to know what your pitch is, and if its even complete. Like what was your pitch when you went to meet this woman? Do you have like a 3 page powerpoint you're going off of? Maybe thats the problem. Our powerpoints are about 25 pages long. And no, we don't sit there and go through every page. But if you run out of things to say, its a very useful tool to have by your side. And the power point itself is designed in specific stages. One stage that warms a person up/builds rapport, another that builds credibility, another that builds value/trust etc. Since we were recently on CBS, thats now in the power point too, and man does that build incredible value just having that 1 video. Think of ways you can build some similar credibility/value, and use them in your powerpoint.
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    • Profile picture of the author ej155
      Originally Posted by RedShifted View Post

      It sounds to me like you rushed the sale.

      If there is one thing I learned in sales its that you should ALWAYS do a full pitch, and take your time to thoroughly explain the benefits of EVERYTHING you are offering.

      And throughout this you work on building a more personal type of rapport with the person. Don't be afraid to ask them some nonrelated questions. Questions that have NOTHING to do with what you are selling. I shows that you are inquisitive, and care more about people than "closing the deal".

      Act like a personable human being. You should come off like you actually like the person you're talking to. Something like "I always do that too". Really work on building that rapport. That will always lower resistance I have found.

      One more point I will add. My brother does sales training for a living. Now I'm not saying he is the best at what he does, but I think he is damn good. And I've learned a lot from him.

      When he trains guys, he says one of the most common problems they suffer from is rushing a sale. They come in, run their pitch, can't think of anything else to say, so they try to close too early. Before they even warm the prospect up.

      I've met a lot of good salesman in my industry, and all the good guys do the same thing. They stay with the prospect for as long as possible. To do this properly, you have to have a million and 1 positive things to say about what you're selling. And in the course of this, you can go off on tangents building rapport with the prospect. This makes them like/trust you more, which makes them actually believe all the benefits you're offering them.

      Closing time comes when you have explained every benefit that there is to explain about what you're selling. If you haven't done that, then you should not try closing.

      I'd be curious to know what your pitch is, and if its even complete. Like what was your pitch when you went to meet this woman? Do you have like a 3 page powerpoint you're going off of? Maybe thats the problem. Our powerpoints are about 25 pages long. And no, we don't sit there and go through every page. But if you run out of things to say, its a very useful tool to have by your side. And the power point itself is designed in specific stages. One stage that warms a person up/builds rapport, another that builds credibility, another that builds value/trust etc. Since we were recently on CBS, thats now in the power point too, and man does that build incredible value just having that 1 video. Think of ways you can build some similar credibility/value, and use them in your powerpoint.
      Red, I think my problem was exactly that I took the majority of the time going through the powerpoint that was about 20 pages. I needed to ask more questions, find pain, develop that pain, offer solution and benefit, but I didn't.

      She really needs my help, their website is really bad and aren't listed at all on Google.

      But they can't see that unless I do a better job and letting her see that. But the help on this forum is taking me step by step further!!
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  • Profile picture of the author bizgrower
    Whether it was too much pressure, needs to be broken into three payments (something affordable for her), or benefits explained better... I think you need to do something to lighten up the atmosphere when you go back Thursday. It's now like you are waiting to hear from that girl you asked to go steady in sixth grade.

    Something like, "Sorry if I put too much pressure on last time, it's that I want to get the returns I believe I can get for you..."

    Dan
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  • Profile picture of the author hayfj2
    Eeeee me.

    A few questions....

    1. What is the cost / impact of her pain in the PAST that she doesnt want to repeat?

    2. What is the cost / impact of her pain in the PRESENT that she doesnt want NOW?

    3. What is the cost / impact of her pain in the FUTURE that she wants to AVOID?

    4. How much have they spent in trying to solve the problem (using diff suppliers)?

    5. How much is the OPPORTUNITY COST NOW?

    If your SOLUTION is less than the COST of their problem - YOU CLOSE THE DEAL.

    Ask the right questions, and the prospect will give you the DATA/NUMBERS you want

    You simply then re-affirm the numbers they give you as they WONT ARGUE WITH THEIR OWN DATA !!!

    BUT THEY WILL ARGUE WITH YOURS

    Think about it.

    Hope that helps.



    Fraser
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  • Profile picture of the author misterme
    Originally Posted by maxrezn View Post

    You can add a verbal contract into your presentations. Something along the lines of: "Now Mr. Prospect, before I tell you how we can fix these issues....I'd like to ask you a for a simple favor. When it comes time for you to evaluate if what I have to offer is for you or not, all I ask for is your honesty in the form of a simple answer of Yes or No. If something doesn't appeal to you, just let me know I promise I won't be upset or offended."
    They'll agree... but at the end of the sale they'll buck that agreement easily.

    I've tried to get some tie-downs along the way too like asking her what she'd want me to put on her website, and she did tell me.
    That's not a tie down. Asking what she wants you to put on her website is an investigative question to determine needs and wants. The tie down itself would be AFTER she tells you what she wants. In other words you're tying her down to the statement she just made. For example, she says she wants a blue background on her website. So you'd then say, "So we're doing this with a blue background then, is that right?" She answers with a yes. Now you've tied her down, that is, committed her, to her description of what she said she wants.

    It's nice to get agreement like that as you converse with the prospects but again, they can buck it at the end.

    the bigger problem is how to get them EXCITED THROUGHOUT the entire meeting/presentation - basically SELLING THEM...
    How do you personally sell offline services that make them WANT TO CLOSE THEMSELVES?
    Let your passion and energy be demonstrative in selling the "why" of what you do. Don't sell the "what" of what you do.

    Watch this:
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  • Profile picture of the author NewParadigm
    People buy on emotion and want the benefits of a product/svc, but use the facts/features to rationalize their purchase.
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    • Profile picture of the author ej155
      Originally Posted by NewParadigm View Post

      People buy on emotion and want the benefits of a product/svc, but use the facts/features to rationalize their purchase.
      I just read something similar last night in the book "How to Master the Art of Selling"!!
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  • Profile picture of the author Anoosh Kashefi
    My friend and I were talking about this yesterday in reference to "I dont have time right now". A good response to this is something like "what, you don't have time to save thousands of dollars?"

    To this rebuttal, I think I would have said something like "the initial startup cost may seem like a burden now, but think about all the money/leads your missing out on every single month due to poor website design and low rankings in the search engines."

    Something like this may trigger something. Not a salesman by any means, and I think you did really well. The best part is your here to learn more. Keep it up!
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    • Profile picture of the author andrewkar
      If she said that she need to check budget that means (probably) she have some money.

      So assuming she can pay for service there must be something else. Maybe she don't trust you and/your company?

      But anyway, at this point when she gave you that line I would say this (and I'm sure a lot of you know this line well...):

      "I hear what you are saying but let me ask you something. Does this idea make sense to you? Do you like it?" and she say YES.

      "Exactly! you see the best part of this... bla bla bla..."

      Then I would wait for her answer, for "ok I take it". If she still wants to check her budget I would tell her:

      "ok, I can understand that you don't like product, or don't like me or my company... Which isn't the case right?" she say "of course".
      "but please don't tell me you have to think about it, or think about budget because we both know this service is going to ..............."

      And I would ask for the order.

      BTW what you think about hardball selling?
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      • Profile picture of the author Sys4
        I always cringe when I see another thread about selling offline marketing services.

        For those wanting the short version, don't sell - qualify.

        Now, the long version...

        Before returning to offline/online marketing, I worked in sales. I sold other people's products and services - from real estate to storage space. I was good. So much so, that my last employer took me off the line to teach salesmanship.

        Having cut my internet marketing sales teeth in the waning months of 1993, selling was a deeply ingrained belief. Imagine walking into a business and trying to convince the owner that a website could increase their revenue, when the owner had never used the internet and had never heard of email. Yes. There was a time when you had to start your sales presentation teaching the potential client the difference between Prodigy and the World Wide Web. Selling was a necessity, then.

        When I returned to Internet marketing, I was selling. I won't go into the gory details further than to say I recognize the position the OP finds himself. It sucked. I was wasting time selling and not generating revenue. So I stopped selling, started qualifying, and generating revenue.

        Now I'm a professional. I've got specialized knowledge and skills that are available for purchase. I'm no different than an attorney, accountant, or auto mechanic. I don't sell. I qualify, plan, collect, and implement. I'll briefly describe the first two steps...

        Qualify: Insure that the potential client needs your services, wants your services, has the budget for your services, and will work with you to deliver your services.

        Plan: Work WITH the client to determine the best way to deliver your service in a way that meets both the client's needs and budget. Working with the client on THEIR plan forces the client to take ownership - no selling involved.

        Please note: This post is about my approach to selling, or qualifying clients. Obviously, as any professional must, I have to market my services and sell myself. But if done properly, qualifying takes the selling out of the process, saves time, and increases revenue.
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  • Profile picture of the author ej155
    Thanks for all the input guys, I've definitely learned a lot here!

    For one, I agree that I definitely rushed the sale and didn't take enough time to develop the desire, excitement, benefits and asking questions to address pain and give solution, etc.

    I've been reading a lot of threads lately on WF about selling and it's helping me a lot. Also reading 2 books recently recommended by Claude which I think is really awesome:

    1) How to master the art of sellling
    2) Spin Selling

    His eBook on Selling Local Advertising is awesome too.

    PLUS the vast amount of threads here really helps. Does anyone know if there's a thread where it COMPILED all the KEY and IMPORTANT selling threads from old and new?

    Anyway, today is Thursday and just got off the call with her, she sounds interested but again she said she is strapped for Cash Flow for this month and tell me to call back in first week of March.

    I tried to give various options, ask her if she spends $1 and get $3 back would that make sense, bring her back to how this can grow her business. But she adamantly said, "look you're giving me all these scenarios, but it's really about the cash flow. I am STRAPPED this month and people are breathing down my neck."

    With that I stopped and just didn't probe further and just asked when would be the best time to call her back. I reassured that she still wanted to get the website done, she said YES. I asked if she still wanted to get ranked on Google, and she said YES. So I'll call her back in 3 weeks. But honestly, I really don't like these waiting games because so many things could happen in the meantime, and who knows what their budget will be in March. But will see.

    What I've learned:

    - I went in so focused on the "presentation" I forgot to develop rapport and ask her more quesitons.
    - Didn't ask much pain questions, didn't assess what she wants.
    - 70-80% of the meeting was me talking and giving my pitch/presentation which was REALLY bad.
    (Note: my presentation was on a computer establishing results I got in the past, testimonials, 3 main services I offer and why it's important, and then a conservative growth projection according to her estimate), then I tried to close... I know really bad eh...I'm learning a lot...lol

    But anyway, just want to give you guys this update.

    Will come back in a few weeks to see if I can give a better update!
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  • Profile picture of the author misterme
    Her ability to pay could've been determined before you showed her a single thing. Maybe she is strapped right now. The thing is, there really isn't a rebuttal for "need to check budget." There's only what we think are rebuttals because if it's merely a smokescreen for a stall then you're rebutting against ethereal phantoms. If it's a genuine stall where she absolutely desires to sign this very moment otherwise but truly doesn't have any cash on hand, then a "rebuttal" may have been, "are you saying this is beyond your ability to pay or are you saying you'd like an affordable payment plan?" and see if she bites on the payment plan idea, which she might if she were really interested.

    Not that I would do that in this particular case because you've already hammered her some. And it already looks like you don't have anything else going on for you from her point of view, if all you do is keep asking her for business despite her telling you she can't pay. This is one I think you need to get back to around down the road.

    Usually though, "check my budget" is a stall which means they're not sold. And if they're not sold, there isn't any magic line to say. Instead you need to go back in the sale and see if the problem was not matching what they want to what you offered, the budget, or if the problem was you.
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    • Profile picture of the author Claude Whitacre
      Originally Posted by misterme View Post

      Her ability to pay could've been determined before you showed her a single thing. Maybe she is strapped right now. The thing is, there really isn't a rebuttal for "need to check budget." There's only what we think are rebuttals because if it's merely a smokescreen for a stall then you're rebutting against ethereal phantoms. If it's a genuine stall where she absolutely desires to sign this very moment otherwise but truly doesn't have any cash on hand, then a "rebuttal" may have been, "are you saying this is beyond your ability to pay or are you saying you'd like an affordable payment plan?" and see if she bites on the payment plan idea, which she might if she were really interested.

      Not that I would do that in this particular case because you've already hammered her some. And it already looks like you don't have anything else going on for you from her point of view, if all you do is keep asking her for business despite her telling you she can't pay. This is one I think you need to get back to around down the road.

      Usually though, "check my budget" is a stall which means they're not sold. And if they're not sold, there isn't any magic line to say. Instead you need to go back in the sale and see if the problem was not matching what they want to what you offered, the budget, or if the problem was you.
      Wow. Yup, I think the entire concept of "answering objections" is wrong.

      Why in the world would anyone object to getting something they understand and want?

      Have you ever objected to getting something you wanted?

      "Check my budget" is an objection I've only had a few times, but it's never real. It's an objection that is created in the moment to sound real. It's a reason, that isn't personal, that gives you a reason she can't act now.

      When selling furniture, it's "I have to go home and measure".
      I used to sell ceiling fans, and I would get that objection. Once or twice, I would just play with the non-customer just to see how far they would go to keep that objection. "We have a 36 inch fan. Is your room wider than three feet?"
      "I'm not sure, I'll have to measure"
      "Is the room smaller that the door that leads to it? All doors are at least 36 inches wide."
      "I'll look when we get home"
      "We have 12 inch wide fans...do you think they would fit?"
      "Maybe, but I'd rather be safe than sorry"

      This was an actual conversation I've had several times. Really.

      Anyway, there isn't ever a close that magically changes someone's mind. There is no rebuttal that makes someone want something they didn't want a second ago.

      And getting someone to commit at the beginning of the presentation doesn't work. Because they haven't seen your offer yet.

      But I always want to know what they were thinking about cost before I show them anything. It's so much easier on us both.

      Misterme said "are you saying this is beyond your ability to pay or are you saying you'd like an affordable payment plan?" I can't think of a better response.
      I might have said (without reading Misterme's post) "Do you mean you aren't interested, or that you don't have the money budgeted to pay me in one lump sum?"

      "One lump sum"
      "I know....you didn't set the money aside for this before I came here, why would you? If you did decide today to go ahead, how would you feel most comfortable... a credit card or spread it out enough to make it easily affordable?"
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      • Profile picture of the author kenmichaels
        Originally Posted by Claude Whitacre View Post

        Wow. Yup, I think the entire concept of "answering objections" is wrong.

        Why in the world would anyone object to getting something they understand and want?

        Have you ever objected to getting something you wanted?

        "Check my budget" is an objection I've only had a few times, but it's never real. It's an objection that is created in the moment to sound real. It's a reason, that isn't personal, that gives you a reason she can't act now.

        When selling furniture, it's "I have to go home and measure".
        I used to sell ceiling fans, and I would get that objection. Once or twice, I would just play with the non-customer just to see how far they would go to keep that objection. "We have a 36 inch fan. Is your room wider than three feet?"
        "I'm not sure, I'll have to measure"
        "Is the room smaller that the door that leads to it? All doors are at least 36 inches wide."
        "I'll look when we get home"
        "We have 12 inch wide fans...do you think they would fit?"
        "Maybe, but I'd rather be safe than sorry"

        This was an actual conversation I've had several times. Really.

        Anyway, there isn't ever a close that magically changes someone's mind. There is no rebuttal that makes someone want something they didn't want a second ago.

        And getting someone to commit at the beginning of the presentation doesn't work. Because they haven't seen your offer yet.

        But I always want to know what they were thinking about cost before I show them anything. It's so much easier on us both.
        Has anyone ever actually NOT wanted what you were selling?

        I can count on one hand the amount of times it has happened to me.

        We are back to painting the entire picture again.
        Paint it properly everyone wants what you have.

        The question is if they want it enough to pay for it.

        "check my budget" used to kill me, until i realized it wasn't a real objection.

        "check my budget" is code for, you left out a part of the picture ...
        i am not yet sold.
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        • Profile picture of the author Claude Whitacre
          Originally Posted by kenmichaels View Post

          Has anyone ever actually NOT wanted what you were selling?
          Ken; HA!

          I've had thousands not want what I was selling. But I've really only had one person tell me that they simply didn't want it, and that's why she didn't buy. One time out of 12,000 presentations.

          I was stunned by her candor, and thanked her profusely. Why? Because I could stop working her, and go home.

          The truth is, you can overcome objections. But only because the price is low, and they would rather buy than continue the process. But really winning an argument? Never.
          And most "answering objections" talk is simply arguing. It isn't selling.

          Aaron; In post 44....That's some mighty fine thinking there, my friend.
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          • Profile picture of the author kenmichaels
            Originally Posted by Claude Whitacre View Post

            Ken; HA!

            I've had thousands not want what I was selling. But I've really only had one person tell me that they simply didn't want it, and that's why she didn't buy. One time out of 12,000 presentations.

            hmmmm, i don't know what to say. Deep down i just want to say ... HUH !

            99.9% of the time i have found objections are about money.

            anything else is just a question.

            I was being serious about only a handful of people NOT wanting what i was selling.

            I am going to think about this a bit, and then come back and comment.
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            • Profile picture of the author Claude Whitacre
              Originally Posted by kenmichaels View Post

              hmmmm, i don't know what to say. Deep down i just want to say ... HUH !

              99.9% of the time i have found objections are about money.

              anything else is just a question.

              I was being serious about only a handful of people NOT wanting what i was selling.

              I am going to think about this a bit, and then come back and comment.
              Ken; And I was serious about only one person saying they didn't want my offer.
              But...this is just the results after I gave a presentation, in person, in their home. So there was time invested by both parties, and they didn't want to break rapport.

              Most objections are about money, because that's what sounds most reasonable to the prospect. But we both know that the real reasons aren't about money. Most people don't buy because we haven't flipped their switch from "this guy is invading my space and trying to take my money...and I'm supposed to say No" to "This guy is looking out for me and is here to help. I'm supposed to say Yes".

              And everyone has that switch. Your move...Giggetty.
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      • Profile picture of the author misterme
        Originally Posted by Claude Whitacre View Post

        "We have a 36 inch fan. Is your room wider than three feet?"
        "I'm not sure, I'll have to measure"
        "Is the room smaller that the door that leads to it? All doors are at least 36 inches wide."
        "I'll look when we get home"
        "We have 12 inch wide fans...do you think they would fit?"
        "Maybe, but I'd rather be safe than sorry"
        BEST LAUGH THIS YEAR... so far.

        I once got "we have to talk about it." And I responded with the conventional Brian Tracey type line, "What is it exactly that you have to talk about?" and he answered with, "well, that's what we have to talk about."
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  • Profile picture of the author Aaron Doud
    Love the fan conversations.

    Fake objections are annoying. And I think nearly all of us in sales at times have followed the fake objection like you did with those fans for fun. It is fun to see how far someone will go to continue to pretend the fake objection is real.

    I truly believe if you are selling properly you won't get many fake objections. And those you do get will be from people you have already mentally checked off your list. Which is to say earlier in the process you already knew they were not buying and you know why they are not buying (as well as anyone can know why someone else does something).

    Losing a sale in my opinion should never be a "surprise" just as closing a sale shouldn't be. No one closes the sale during the "close" though some people out in the sales world mistakenly believe they do. You "close" sales well in advance of the close. When you get to the close it should feel natural because it is natural.

    For example the other day I got to sell an RV (something I don't get to do often anymore) and even though they told me multiple times they were not buying "today" I knew about half way through the "sale" that they were buying. In fact when I went to get numbers they told me again they were not buying "today". Yet when I got back he was on the phone with his bank checking on his financing again.

    Once we sat down in my office all that was left were the formalities, like what the price would be. So when it came time to close there were no objections because we had discussed any possible objections (minus price) during the sale process. And when you built trust with your clients/customers they don't object to price because they know you are going to give them a fair price like you have already told them you would.

    I honestly believe the only two true price objections are the following.

    1. Can't afford it. And this objection is about a failure in the interview process. If you present numbers and find this objection you failed to find out what they could and wanted to spend. As per my example I may want a new GTR but I can not afford to purchase one. So a sales person who got me in the office on a new GTR would have failed badly since he should have put me in a new 370Z or a used sports car on the lot which is in my budget.

    2. The "like to haggle" objection. These guys will object to any price you throw at them because they want to feel they won. You should know this objection is coming and should have priced yourself with some room to let him work you. This is a problem for people who work in "no haggle" dealerships as often they don't have room to move.

    Too many people in sales rush to the close because they believe that is the point a sale happens (largely due to bad training and bad managers who want them to "desk" everyone who comes in). But the truly successful sales professionals know that if you get to the close before the sale has "happened" you have little chance of closing. It is hard to explain what I mean by the "sale happened" to people who have not sold for a long time but old pros will understand what I mean.
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  • Profile picture of the author misterme
    Bump. Always good to re-read these older threads and refresh the memory banks.
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    • Profile picture of the author kenmichaels
      Originally Posted by misterme View Post

      Bump. Always good to re-read these older threads and refresh the memory banks.
      The best one was locked
      It's a shame that we can't appeal that decision.

      btw:
      It's good to see you around
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