Website Prospect: "That's Expensive!"...WF Pls Advise: Can I Put This In My Proposal/Offer?

by RyanLester 8 replies
Ever had a prospect scoff at a reasonably priced website?

I thought about putting in a section called "What Do Websites Cost These Days?" and listing some competitor pricing (w/out competitor names)?

Or Bad Idea?
#offline marketing #advise #pls #proposal or offer #prospect #put #that expensivewf #website
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  • Profile picture of the author globalpro
    You will get that reaction if they don't understand the value of what you are offering.

    Knowing what others are charging where you are at is a good place to start (know what you are up against), but rather than trying to 'compete', focus on what you are offering that makes you better/different than the 'other guy'.

    I tried playing that game and soon figured out that what I am offering is not a website/mobile website, but a marketing solution that needs a website. I have quite a few website companies where I live that will build a nice website, but not do anything beyond that.

    To me, that's like buying a shiny new car and leaving it parked in the driveway. It's useless if you don't get it out on the road for people to see.

    Rather than trying to compete, you have to excel and it's not about the website, but more about what you do with it once it's up and running.
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  • Profile picture of the author globalpro
    You will get that reaction if they don't understand the value of what you are offering.

    Knowing what others are charging where you are at is a good place to start (know what you are up against), but rather than trying to 'compete', focus on what you are offering that makes you better/different than the 'other guy'.

    I tried playing that game and soon figured out that what I am offering is not a website/mobile website, but a marketing solution that needs a website. I have quite a few website companies where I live that will build a nice website, but not do anything beyond that.

    To me, that's like buying a shiny new car and leaving it parked in the driveway. It's useless if you don't get it out on the road for people to see.

    Rather than trying to compete, you have to excel and it's not about the website, but more about what you do with it once it's up and running.
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  • Profile picture of the author Rearden
    Ask, "How do you mean?" Then shut up and listen.

    And rebuttal appropriately.

    Reduce it down into payments...

    Build value versus using cheap-o foreign help...

    Just customize the response to whatever his reason is for balking at your price.

    Then close him.
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  • Profile picture of the author Jason Kanigan
    "Compared to what?"

    Or read this. You shouldn't get any arguments this way.

    If you get the knee-jerk "That's too expensive!", you didn't have your prospect value the size of the problem...and therefore the solution.'

    I would spend $1 to make $10, all day long.
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    • Profile picture of the author Claude Whitacre
      No! No! No! No! No!....NO!!!!!

      Why in the world would someone say that your website is too expensive?

      Didn't you qualify? Didn't you Price Condition?

      The prospect should be telling you that they would spend far more than you are asking, early in the presentation...in fact, as part of the qualifying.

      Kanigan explains how to do this nicely, in one of his WSOs (I forget which one).

      And (my dearest Kanigan), not "Compared to what?"
      I always compare my solution to other viable solutions. All of which cost more and take longer. It gives the prospect the feeling that they have shopped, and set up a value for the thing you are selling.

      I'll be frank. I've used "Compared to what?", even recently. But it's only because I forgot to cover that in the presentation.

      At the end, if you get any objection other than "I want to think it over", the objection could have been handled in the qualifying and presentation phase, and should have been.

      In fact, one good way to construct a presentation is to think of every possible objection, and handle it in Qualifying, setting up the value, and presenting. Way before closing.

      If you have to answer this as an objection, you are back peddling, and trying to breath life into a dying sale.

      Once someone raises an objection, they have already taken the path of "I'm not buying...and here's why".

      So you need to bring up price, you need to ask questions that cause them to tell you that they would gladly...gladly pay more than you are asking.

      Again, Kanigan has a very well written sequence for this.
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      • Profile picture of the author Jason Kanigan
        Originally Posted by Claude Whitacre View Post

        No! No! No! No! No!....NO!!!!!

        Why in the world would someone say that your website is too expensive?

        Didn't you qualify? Didn't you Price Condition?

        The prospect should be telling you that they would spend far more than you are asking, early in the presentation...in fact, as part of the qualifying.

        Kanigan explains how to do this nicely, in one of his WSOs (I forget which one).

        And (my dearest Kanigan), not "Compared to what?"
        I always compare my solution to other viable solutions. All of which cost more and take longer. It gives the prospect the feeling that they have shopped, and set up a value for the thing you are selling.

        I'll be frank. I've used "Compared to what?", even recently. But it's only because I forgot to cover that in the presentation.

        At the end, if you get any objection other than "I want to think it over", the objection could have been handled in the qualifying and presentation phase, and should have been.

        In fact, one good way to construct a presentation is to think of every possible objection, and handle it in Qualifying, setting up the value, and presenting. Way before closing.

        If you have to answer this as an objection, you are back peddling, and trying to breath life into a dying sale.

        Once someone raises an objection, they have already taken the path of "I'm not buying...and here's why".

        So you need to bring up price, you need to ask questions that cause them to tell you that they would gladly...gladly pay more than you are asking.

        Again, Kanigan has a very well written sequence for this.
        LOLCATS I don't actually say "Compared to what?" to prospects.

        I'm just pointing it out. "That's too expensive!" is a knee-jerk whine and it means nothing. The prospect has nothing to compare it to.

        ...unless you price conditioned them, as you say, and then it won't happen.
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  • Profile picture of the author Chris Rivers
    Hey Ryan,

    I strongly agree with John.

    Without knowing how you generated this lead in the first place, it's hard to say anything conclusively, but generally speaking, many of our struggles as consultants is because of no/poor positioning which puts us behind the eight ball before we even start.

    What's your USP that makes you stand out? Did this lead come to you through a funnel or was it generated from cold calling, direct mail etc.?

    What can you do for the business owner AFTER the website is built that makes you stand out?

    Are you packaging your website with other marketing services or components which raises the value in the business owner's eye's?

    You may have all the above covered, but I thought I'd give some food for thought.

    If that were me, I would try to refocus a prospect like that back to the reality that I'm putting together a comprehensive marketing plan that's all about getting customers, and that plan includes a website because that's what they need to convert the leads I'll be generating for them into paying customers.

    But all that is assuming you're offering full-service consulting and not just website design.

    Hope this helps,

    Chris
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  • Profile picture of the author MaxwellB
    Originally Posted by RyanLester View Post

    Ever had a prospect scoff at a reasonably priced website?

    I thought about putting in a section called "What Do Websites Cost These Days?" and listing some competitor pricing (w/out competitor names)?

    Or Bad Idea?
    Everyone else's comments are great and I would have said the same thing EXCEPT...and I hope no one mentioned this yet and I'm sorry if I stepped on anyones toes BUT...from your post it sounds like your using a proposal to give the price.

    "no no no, not in my house" never ever give your price in a proposal....your completely commoditizing your web design services. You should not be "giving quotes" or "sending proposals"

    Your pricing should be discussed in a face to face or phone sales presentation, the only paperwork you should be sending is a "service agreement" "work agreement" "web design contract" whatever you want to call it...that you send AFTER you have gotten a verbal agreement from the prospect and your moving forward with them.

    I find that most true web designers, as in people who do the design and development work with proposals or think they need to give quotes etc...no sell your service properly with pricing given in the sales meeting so you can demonstrate the value and handle any objections then. Otherwise your just a low cost provider.
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