"I overcame all his objections, but he still didn't hire me..."

32 replies
Hey,

Have you ever seen those books that offer to teach you 101 ways to overcome a prospect's objections?

I always find myself thumbing through those type of books, hoping to learn something new and innovative, but I've never been able to fully buy in.

Maybe it's just me, but when I try to "overcome" a prospect's objection, it has the potential to go south or begin to sound like begging.

Now that's not to say that I don't have polished answers to common questions, but that's feels alot different to me than fighting to overcome objections.

As a consultant, you should always have good explanations for your mindset, advice and recommendations, but you shouldn't be "overcoming" something your client says.

Even if they're feeding you a bunch of boloney, you still need to make sure you're presentation navigates their boloney with respect, dignity and clear purpose.

After all there's nothing worse than working your butt off to get that face-to-face appointment and then losing it because you're presentation became a rebuttal party.

Plus, the old fashioned mindset you have to put on to "overcome an objection", can bring a ton of negative energy to the situation.

After all, when the "overcoming" starts, everyone in the room know what's happening. You've just transformed yourself from trusted advisor to aggressive salesman.

That's the ultimate loss of good positioning.

What I've found to be more natural and effective is asking questions that help a prospect come to their own conclusion and then I ask for the committment to move forward with solving the problems we've just acknowledged.

I find that it's easier for me to use phrases like...

- "Does that make sense?"

- "Do you think that would help you reach your goal of _____?"

- "What are your thoughts on ________?"

- "If you could change anything in your business overnight, what would it be?"

There are dozens of phrases and wording that I could share, but the point is that those phrases above are more natural (to me) and are conversational, but still move the conversation to a good place.

Every now and then you'll get a jerk who may say something along the lines of "I don't know what to do, that's why you're here", but that's not the norm.

The average business owner will be glad that you're treating them with respect and dignity while trying to see if you're a good fit to work together.

That's what you want.

You want that "we can make good things happen by working together" feeling.

It's not always possible, but I absolutely knock it out of the park when the energy is flowing right. So, I try to recreate that atmosphere as much as possible.

Chris
#business coach #marketing consultant #offline plr
  • Profile picture of the author Claude Whitacre
    Chris; The whole "Overcoming objections" idea is flawed. That's why it seldom works.

    Think of the last thing that you bought...that you wanted.

    How may closes did it take? How many objections did you raise before buying?

    In seminars, I'll ask the audience to think of the last expensive thing they bought that thy really wanted. Then I ask how many objections were raised. How many closes.

    The answer is nearly 100% saying. No objections. One close.

    An objection means that the person is fighting you and doesn't want to buy.
    Have to go. More later.
    Signature
    One Call Closing book https://www.amazon.com/One-Call-Clos...=1527788418&sr

    "When you look at someone through rose-colored glasses, all the red flags just look like flags" Bojack Horseman
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7989121].message }}
    • Profile picture of the author TheBigBee
      Originally Posted by Claude Whitacre View Post

      Chris; The whole "Overcoming objections" idea is flawed. That's why it seldom works.

      Think of the last thing that you bought...that you wanted.

      How may closes did it take? How many objections did you raise before buying?

      In seminars, I'll ask the audience to think of the last expensive thing they bought that thy really wanted. Then I ask how many objections were raised. How many closes.

      The answer is nearly 100% saying. No objections. One close.

      An objection means that the person is fighting you and doesn't want to buy.
      Have to go. More later.

      Cliffhanger! Please expound!
      Signature
      FILL IN THE BLANKS!
      {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7989164].message }}
    • Profile picture of the author kenmichaels
      Originally Posted by Claude Whitacre View Post

      Chris; The whole "Overcoming objections" idea is flawed. That's why it seldom works.
      .
      I think it is flawed ... because most people don't Really know what a true objection is.

      Most think any thing not flowing in the direction they want it to is an objection.

      I cant tell you how many times i have listened to recordings and before the recordings
      I asked the rep about the call. and they said i had to over come objection after
      objection ... and when i listened to the call, there was no objections ....

      just buying signals ... that the reps misinterpreted.

      in my experience it is rather hard to teach someone to understand the difference.
      Not mentally, they all get it... but viscerally ... in the moment.

      Maybe I am just bad at teaching ... o wait I am bad at teaching ...lol
      Signature

      Selling Ain't for Sissies!
      {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7989249].message }}
      • Profile picture of the author Colm Whelan
        Originally Posted by kenmichaels View Post

        .
        I think its flawed ... because most people don't Really know what a true objection is.

        Most think any thing not flowing in the direction they want it to is an objection.
        What, more cliffhangers? The tension is killing me
        {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7989252].message }}
        • Profile picture of the author kenmichaels
          Originally Posted by Colm Whelan View Post

          What, more cliffhangers? The tension is killing me
          no cliffhanger

          I am just a dude who can sell, wait for Claude, he can put things in print
          and have them make sense.

          If you want me to try... your gonna wanna quit sales by the time your done reading
          I will mess you up... that bad.
          Signature

          Selling Ain't for Sissies!
          {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7989266].message }}
          • Profile picture of the author Claude Whitacre
            Originally Posted by kenmichaels View Post

            no cliffhanger

            I am just a dude who can sell, wait for Claude, he can put things in print
            and have them make sense.

            If you want me to try... your gonna wanna quit sales by the time your done reading
            I will mess you up... that bad.
            First, stop saying you can't teach. You can, and you do.

            Aaron; Your last couple of posts show what I suspected. You have a real understanding of selling, far more than most sales book authors.

            OK, Chris Rivers;

            The reason salesmen get objections is because they haven't given the prospect the complete confidence that the proposed solution is the best solution for them. The salesperson has not tied what they sell completely to what the prospects are thinking.

            I can promise you that salespeople are telling the prospect things, rather than asking questions so that prospects will tell the salesman the exact same things.

            By the way...you said you read sales books. That alone puts you ahead of 95% of salespeople. And your post shows a real understanding of selling too.

            The problem is that the people that wrote the books didn't make 5,000 personal sales or more.

            These are examples of what we usually think of as objections;
            I can't afford it-too much money
            Need to think about it
            I'll definitely buy...later...but right now...

            These are symptoms that show a large gap in the sales process. One the salesperson created.

            And if prospects bring these things up at the end of the presentation, we are now back peddling, arguing....arguing with the prospect. When was the last time you bought something because the salesperson won an argument with you? Never. But that's what's taught as "technique"

            Guys; Remember the last girlfriend you...um..."kissed"?
            Did you argue with her about whether she should "kiss" you or not...until she finally agreed? The answer is "No". Always.

            But that's the way some of us sell. We think of it as a battle of wills. That's why we are exhausted at the end of a day of selling.

            You ask questions to find problems your offer can sell. You ask questions to explore the cost of those problems. You ask questions to get the prospect to tell you how much they will pay for the solution. You ask questions to reveal possible solutions, and their costs. You ask questions to match your solution perfectly to their problem. And them you ask a question to arrange the delivery of your service.

            What is the common thread in all these questions? It is that the prospect is telling you...what they want... how much they will pay...how bad they want it...what you need to know to match your offer to their wants...and that now is the best time to start.

            And no prospect ever raises an objection to something they have just told you.

            The process (with some variations) is outlined in the magnificent book Spin Selling.

            Jason Kanigan has laid out the spine of this, as a template, in his Sales courses.

            And there is a thread on answering objections that covers this whole subject nicely.

            I sell a $6,400 (the first year) marketing service to small business owners.
            When I'm at the end, about 80% just say "Let's get started right away"

            About 20% (in one on one selling) say "Wow! That's fantastic. We're going to absolutely do this program with you...as soon as we....blah, blah, blah"

            I never get "We can't afford it". Never. why? Because they told me how much they would pay, and they did it before I really started the main presentation (as Kanigan teaches).

            I never hear "I need to think about it", because They are the ones who kept telling me (with proper guidance) exactly what they wanted. And they told me how much my solution would probably make them in additional profit.

            Again, any real objection at the end, means they have to argue with themselves.

            An additional benefit of having the prospect answering your questions, instead of listening (maybe the huge core benefit of all this), is that while they are telling you what they want, and describing how much your solution would help them, it is impossible for doubt to creep in. They are actually in selling mode, not buying mode.

            And if you are talking, talking, talking...there are huge gaps between when they are truly listening to you. And these gaps are filled with unanswered questions, comparisons to things you never hear about, and objections they are thinking of, but never say. And you cannot answer doubts never spoken.

            And (drum roll please), when they are selling you...they don't have time to think about the last five guys that ripped them off, and how much you remind them of that creep that is stalking their sister.

            Of course, that's just the surface. But it's in the right direction, I think.
            See Ken? You could have said it better or more clearly. Or we could have waited a post or two, and Aaron would have said it.

            Got to go,
            Claudius
            Signature
            One Call Closing book https://www.amazon.com/One-Call-Clos...=1527788418&sr

            "When you look at someone through rose-colored glasses, all the red flags just look like flags" Bojack Horseman
            {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7989710].message }}
            • Profile picture of the author kenmichaels
              Originally Posted by Claude Whitacre View Post

              And (drum roll please), when they are selling you...they don't have time to think about the last five guys that ripped them off, and how much you remind them of that creep that is stalking their sister.
              wait, what, huh ??? I thought on another thread you guys made it clear you did NOT do that. ie, reverse it in the process and make them sell you


              Originally Posted by Claude Whitacre View Post

              Of course, that's just the surface. But it's in the right direction, I think.
              See Ken? You could have said it better or more clearly. Or we could have waited a post or two, and Aaron would have said it.

              Got to go,
              Claudius
              nahh, not better, maybe just in one line... concise would be the word? maybe.

              evil laugh.

              And no i don't teach. Very few in here actually get me or what i say.
              The ones that do are already at a certain level or beyond. So it is not teaching
              it is simply relating. Just my humble opinion brotha.

              and yeah Aaron does have some chops. He has been on my must read list for a while.
              I said to him the other day... ( i think he missed it ) every time he posts
              my respect for him rises. ... shoot , did that sound dirty?
              Signature

              Selling Ain't for Sissies!
              {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7989736].message }}
              • Profile picture of the author Claude Whitacre
                Originally Posted by kenmichaels View Post

                wait, what, huh ??? I thought on another thread you guys made it clear you did NOT do that. ie, reverse it in the process and make them sell you
                Edited later; This is a better way of saying this; The prospect is really rationalizing why they should buy. And if there is more than one person in the room, this acts as a sales presentation to everyone else in the room. This dynamic works a little better with more than one prospect (couples/partners).
                They aren't really selling you, they are verbalizing the process going on in their mind. "Them selling you" is catchy, but slightly inaccurate.


                And while they are doing that, I'm rubbing their tummy with coconut oil and singing them a Michael Jackson song. And THAT is the real reason they buy. (that was a joke, friends)




                Originally Posted by kenmichaels View Post


                and yeah Aaron does have some chops. He has been on my must read list for a while.
                I said to him the other day... ( i think he missed it ) every time he posts
                my respect for him rises. ... shoot , did that sound dirty?
                It didn't until you said it!
                Signature
                One Call Closing book https://www.amazon.com/One-Call-Clos...=1527788418&sr

                "When you look at someone through rose-colored glasses, all the red flags just look like flags" Bojack Horseman
                {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7989743].message }}
                • Profile picture of the author kenmichaels
                  Originally Posted by Claude Whitacre View Post

                  Edited later; This is a better way of saying this; The prospect is really rationalizing why they should buy. And if there is more than one person in the room, this acts as a sales presentation to everyone else in the room. This dynamic works a little better with more than one prospect (couples/partners).
                  They aren't really selling you, they are verbalizing the process going on in their mind. "Them selling you" is catchy, but slightly inaccurate.
                  SO i let this slide for a few days, because i wasn't sure the best way to respond.

                  I am still not sure, but it has been on my mind since you said it,
                  and if i don't address it now, I may as well not at all.

                  They way you describe it there, I agree 100% . catchy but inaccurate.

                  When i was talking about reverse tie downs.
                  I wasn't being catchy, I was being literal.

                  The whole point is to make then go blank for a second...
                  you know the look.. when you say something they get confused
                  or aren't sure ... and then they get that "look" .... kinda glazed over

                  I don't know what its called. but i know when i force them into that
                  they are now open .... and at that point, I pull away and say
                  nope this isn't for you ... and the look disappears... the tone changes

                  and they then start telling me all the reasons why it is for them.

                  I only do this with people who want what i have, but are scared of the price.

                  back in the day i am guilty of doing it on people not 100 ready for the product
                  I did it to get the sale. Those always charged back eventually.

                  Now i only do it to help the wanters get over the fear of price and failure.

                  truth is i don't do anything, I just help them get out of there own way.

                  get it?

                  Did i explain it well enough to make sense?
                  Signature

                  Selling Ain't for Sissies!
                  {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7995689].message }}
                  • Profile picture of the author Claude Whitacre
                    Originally Posted by kenmichaels View Post

                    SO i let this slide for a few days, because i wasn't sure the best way to respond.

                    I am still not sure, but it has been on my mind since you said it,
                    and if i don't address it now, I may as well not at all.

                    They way you describe it there, I agree 100% . catchy but inaccurate.

                    When i was talking about reverse tie downs.
                    I wasn't being catchy, I was being literal.


                    The whole point is to make then go blank for a second...
                    you know the look.. when you say something they get confused
                    or aren't sure ... and then they get that "look" .... kinda glazed over

                    I don't know what its called. but i know when i force them into that
                    they are now open .... and at that point, I pull away and say
                    nope this isn't for you ... and the look disappears... the tone changes

                    and they then start telling me all the reasons why it is for them.


                    I only do this with people who want what i have, but are scared of the price.

                    back in the day i am guilty of doing it on people not 100 ready for the product
                    I did it to get the sale. Those always charged back eventually.

                    Now i only do it to help the wanters get over the fear of price and failure.

                    truth is i don't do anything, I just help them get out of there own way.

                    get it?

                    Did i explain it well enough to make sense?
                    I get it. You and I are talking about slightly different processes. You are catching them in a moment of mental flux IE, they are momentarily out of flow. And then you are redirecting them to change their perspective...and now prove to you why they deserve this offer.

                    What I'm doing is more guiding them to verbalize their own mental process. They aren't really changing direction. With your example, they are.

                    You and MRME have a better skill at triggering an emotional defense response than I do. "Daring "the customer is something I'm not adept at.

                    I hope I did your post justice.
                    Signature
                    One Call Closing book https://www.amazon.com/One-Call-Clos...=1527788418&sr

                    "When you look at someone through rose-colored glasses, all the red flags just look like flags" Bojack Horseman
                    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7995804].message }}
                    • Profile picture of the author kenmichaels
                      Originally Posted by Claude Whitacre View Post


                      I hope I did your post justice.
                      of course you did

                      I thought maybe I wasn't clear last go around... and for some reason
                      I felt it was important for you to know.

                      that in and of itself is kinda weird for me... cause usually i don't care
                      what people think.

                      btw, so far, i have yet to see where we disagree...

                      Is it weird that i am kinda looking forward to when we do?
                      I think its going to make for some really good conversation.
                      Signature

                      Selling Ain't for Sissies!
                      {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7995922].message }}
                      • Profile picture of the author Claude Whitacre
                        Originally Posted by kenmichaels View Post

                        btw, so far, i have yet to see where we disagree...

                        Is it weird that i am kinda looking forward to when we do?
                        I think its going to make for some really good conversation.
                        Ken; So far, we have been discussing subjects that are ruled by our "thinking brain". And if you are rational, the more you know...the more you agree with others that know.

                        But, as soon as we get into values and points-o-view, you'll see a difference.
                        Originally Posted by ewenmack View Post

                        Claude, how do you reconcile where SPIN selling takes you to discovery,
                        while Pitch Anything is same message to everyone.

                        I heard Oren compared rock stars don't change their show if they are in Chicago to Houston or Europe...it's the same.
                        Owen; Thank you for the compliment of asking for my take.

                        My pitches are 95% the same for every prospect. When I sold vacuum cleaners in people's homes, it was 99% the same. So the prospects are really getting a "pitch", like Oren describes.

                        But I ask discovery questions. I ask problem aggravation and expansion questions, I ask questions to find what will appeal the the prospect. But the core presentation is mostly the same.

                        I sell one service, just one. But I can widely adjust the path I take until I get to the core presentation. It makes my solution appear far more customized than it is. And the discovery questions give the prospect the feeling that I care, that I am customizing my solution, and that I know my business.

                        It would be similar if I was a doctor, and I did everything a doctor would do...ask about symptoms, perform tests, look concerned, check your chart...but I always prescribed aspirin. (Man, that makes me sound bad). So I'm doing everything around my core pitch pretty much like Spin Selling suggests. But all of that is to support the same Pitch I'm going to give...as in Pitch Anything.

                        Did that help?

                        As far as Jason's personality types? I will match and mirror my prospect a little (maybe more than most). But my skill really isn't in that area. I'm not an empathetic person. And I don't catch a lot of the clues that would help me match someone's preferred communication modes.

                        And Ewen; You sell a commodity. So do I. But everything around the core pitch can be customized....or at least appear to be.

                        Now we're down to three people. :rolleyes:
                        Signature
                        One Call Closing book https://www.amazon.com/One-Call-Clos...=1527788418&sr

                        "When you look at someone through rose-colored glasses, all the red flags just look like flags" Bojack Horseman
                        {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7997283].message }}
            • Profile picture of the author Scott Stevens
              Originally Posted by Claude Whitacre View Post

              Jason Kanigan has laid out the spine of this, as a template, in his Sales courses.

              And there is a thread on answering objections that covers this whole subject nicely.

              I sell a $6,400 (the first year) marketing service to small business owners.
              When I'm at the end, about 80% just say "Let's get started right away"

              About 20% (in one on one selling) say "Wow! That's fantastic. We're going to absolutely do this program with you...as soon as we....blah, blah, blah"

              I never get "We can't afford it". Never. why? Because they told me how much they would pay, and they did it before I really started the main presentation (as Kanigan teaches).
              Thanks for that great post, Claude.

              You refer to courses by Jason Kanigan - where can one get a hold of these?

              Also, I've read a lot of your posts, and the content and advice is solid. Do you yourself have any materials? And can you recommend any other Warriors/courses/books on getting good at sales?

              Great thread.
              Signature

              Yours in prosperity,
              Skochy - The Musical Salesman

              {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7990127].message }}
              • Profile picture of the author Claude Whitacre
                Originally Posted by Scotty Stevens View Post

                Thanks for that great post, Claude.

                You refer to courses by Jason Kanigan - where can one get a hold of these?

                Also, I've read a lot of your posts, and the content and advice is solid. Do you yourself have any materials? And can you recommend any other Warriors/courses/books on getting good at sales?

                Great thread.
                Scotty; Kanigan's course is called Sales Judo. Just search for it and it will come up.

                Read Spin Selling.

                My book Selling Local Advertising covers much of what I do in selling. Nothing as in depth as what we talk about here. Just click my signature link to go to Amazon.com.

                This is pretty advanced Kung Fu. And as always, we now have an audience of four.

                There is also a thread here on rebuttles to objections. It's very good.
                Signature
                One Call Closing book https://www.amazon.com/One-Call-Clos...=1527788418&sr

                "When you look at someone through rose-colored glasses, all the red flags just look like flags" Bojack Horseman
                {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7990175].message }}
                • Profile picture of the author Scott Stevens
                  Originally Posted by Claude Whitacre View Post

                  Scotty; Kanigan's course is called Sales Judo. Just search for it and it will come up.

                  Read Spin Selling.

                  My book Selling Local Advertising covers much of what I do in selling. Nothing as in depth as what we talk about here. Just click my signature link to go to Amazon.com.

                  This is pretty advanced Kung Fu. And as always, we now have an audience of four.

                  There is also a thread here on rebuttles to objections. It's very good.
                  Thanks a million, Claude. I will look at these. Have a great day.
                  Signature

                  Yours in prosperity,
                  Skochy - The Musical Salesman

                  {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7990499].message }}
                • Profile picture of the author ewenmack
                  Originally Posted by Claude Whitacre View Post


                  Read Spin Selling.
                  Claude, how do you reconcile where SPIN selling takes you to discovery,
                  while Pitch Anything is same message to everyone.

                  I heard Oren compared rock stars don't change their show if they are in Chicago to Houston or Europe...it's the same.

                  Thoughts?

                  Best,
                  Ewen
                  {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7996376].message }}
                  • Profile picture of the author Jason Kanigan
                    Originally Posted by ewenmack View Post

                    Claude, how do you reconcile where SPIN selling takes you to discovery,
                    while Pitch Anything is same message to everyone.

                    I heard Oren compared rock stars don't change their show if they are in Chicago to Houston or Europe...it's the same.

                    Thoughts?

                    Best,
                    Ewen
                    I know you asked Claude, and I'm sure he'll give his take on it, but I'll jump in here.

                    I have no idea why you would present the same way to everyone. And I think that's a terrible idea. It comes down to approach, though.

                    In copy, you don't have a choice: your message appears in some media, and you have to niche down to your avatar/target market and speak directly to them. You only get that one chance.

                    In person, you could do the same. This to me is the equivalent of the copywriting approach: niche down, look for your market and anyone else gets a "Next!"

                    But that's such a waste.

                    Consider: with behavioral profiling systems like DISC or Myers-Briggs we have at least four and possibly many other "personality types" in the world. Surely we will encounter all four or more types as we move through the world of selling. You are one type. As a 'member' of that type, you prefer to receive information a certain way. Maybe you like to get the point, and summaries are the way to go. That 30-page keyword report that got plopped on your desk will never get read. So you create your presentation that way: for your preferences. How else could you, if you're unconscious of the other types? Therefore your presentation is only effective for your one type...meaning that you're alienating the other three-quarters of your marketplace.

                    Alternatively, if we were aware of these different types of people, and understood their preferences for receiving information and communicating, we could...ask them (when? during the discovery process)...and customize our presentation for their type. And then our presentation would be effective for every type of individual.

                    It takes longer. It is more work. And it's also vastly more effective.

                    One-way pitchers can get in and get out more quickly.

                    Those who discover their prospect's buying and communication preferences during the "doctoring for pain" and "uncovering the decision making method" phases have a distinct leg up on their single-approach competitors. Imagine being told "Yours was the only proposal I read!" because you were the only salesperson who asked whether your prospect wanted a summary or detailed write-up. Happens to me.
                    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7996681].message }}
                    • Profile picture of the author ewenmack
                      Originally Posted by Jason Kanigan View Post

                      I know you asked Claude, and I'm sure he'll give his take on it, but I'll jump in here.

                      I have no idea why you would present the same way to everyone. And I think that's a terrible idea. It comes down to approach, though.
                      I can see the need or value in a different approach in different situations.

                      As an example in my business of paper receipt rolls.

                      It is standard sizing dictated by the machine makers
                      which are more or less industry standard. So approaching
                      established businesses is giving the same brief presentation
                      to lure them away from their existing supplier.

                      You might call it a commodity business.

                      Now when you are in the business of consulting
                      and knowledge based expertise then I can see the advantage of tailoring your message to the individual.

                      Playing devil's advocate, we see people pitching ideas on the show Shark Tank. The candidates I suspect would be giving the same message to other potential investors as well.

                      Back to a neutral stance.

                      I believe there is a place for both,
                      just a matter of knowing where each fits best.

                      I think Claude will like this discussion.

                      Claude, come on in as soon as you can!

                      Thanks.

                      Ewen
                      {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7996708].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author Aaron Doud
    I think most people don't really understand what "overcoming objections" means. Even some sales books get it wrong.

    The reason for this is that sales training is aimed at managers and owners and they like the idea of magic closing.

    But in reality "overcoming objections" is really the whole sales process. Objections is just another word for the questions they will have. "Does it come in blue" is an objection as much as "that is too much" (aka how can I afford this? or I don't see the value in this). As you get better in sales you will find that most "objections" you are bringing up well before the person you are selling to can.

    I always like to have all objections (minus price though I hope I have shown the value enough and have shown how they can afford it) done before I "desk" a deal (which is when in a dealership you get numbers, aka you "close). But most people think "overcoming objections" is part of the closing and that by magically having an answer for every "objection" you can close the sale. IMO this could not be further from the truth. Any objection that comes up in closing that isn't something you knew about (and thought you had already overcome) was a failing in your selling process.

    If you are "overcoming objections" in that sense you are not as good at selling as you think you are.

    But if you truly know what "overcoming objections" really means you that it is the selling process.

    Stuff like 101 Closes is fun for guys who know how to sell because it will help you close more deals. But the guy who isn't good at selling will be stick in average if he thinks that kind of training will help him. In fact some sales people would be better off if they learned to stop closing. The vast majority of sales people close too soon not too late.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7989260].message }}
    • Profile picture of the author kenmichaels
      Originally Posted by Aaron Doud View Post


      But in reality "overcoming objections" is really the whole sales process. Objections is just another word for the questions they will have. "Does it come in blue" is an objection as much as "that is too much" (aka how can I afford this? or I don't see the value in this). As you get better in sales you will find that most "objections" you are bringing up well before the person you are selling to can.
      If you say that to me, I know beyond a shadow of a doubt, you are sold.

      Now all I need to do .. is NOT make a mistake and unsell or over sell you.

      Originally Posted by Aaron Doud View Post

      The vast majority of sales people close too soon not too late.
      spot on Aaron, spot on
      Signature

      Selling Ain't for Sissies!
      {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7989279].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author Aaron Doud
    Trust me if I ask if it comes in blue (favorite car color) I am sold.

    And guess what it doesn't need to be blue. In fact only one of my cars has ever been blue even though not being blue is always an objections. But I like red, maroon, green, silver and white as well. Black might be the only color I don't like and have never owned.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7989290].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author Aaron Doud
    <off topic>Big thanks to Claude and Ken. Those posts put a smile on my face tonight. Much better than dealing with water in the basement which is how my day started. </off topic>
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7989915].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author Handdy
    Books offer great insight. But the thing is, what works for one person need not necessarily work for you. You know the nature of your situation better than the author of the book. So it is better to stick to what works for you and keep improvising.
    Signature

    Get Handdy Online Invoicing and Online Accounting for small business

    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7990512].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author Rearden
    So... if I take woman out for a fun night and we come back and she says, "What are you going to do with me now?"...

    Is that an objection or a buying signal?

    I had one last night like that (a sales call, not a date). Took him through the presentation, uncover need, and pitched the deal.

    He asked me how he had to pay.

    Clearly this wasn't an objection; just a buying signal.
    Signature
    David Duford -- Providing On-Going, Personalized Mentorship And Training From A Real Final Expense Producer To Agents New To The Final Expense Life Insurance Business.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7990690].message }}
    • Profile picture of the author Scott Stevens
      Originally Posted by Rearden View Post

      So... if I take woman out for a fun night and we come back and she says, "What are you going to do with me now?"...
      It must be nice when that happens. Sigh.
      Signature

      Yours in prosperity,
      Skochy - The Musical Salesman

      {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7990709].message }}
    • Profile picture of the author LynnM
      Originally Posted by Rearden View Post

      So... if I take woman out for a fun night and we come back and she says, "What are you going to do with me now?"...

      Is that an objection or a buying signal?
      It's an invitation...
      {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7991461].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author Eddie Spangler
    Often the objection/rebuttal thing is painful because the sales rep is trying to give honest, helpful answers to an objection when the prospect is really just trying to come up with any excuse that doesnt require them to say "no".
    Signature
    Promise Big.
    Deliver Bigger.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7991295].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author misterme
    The other thing about answering or overcoming objections is that popular culture makes it out to be all about converting nays to yeas but an objection can also lead to disqualifying the prospect.

    Originally Posted by Handdy View Post

    Books offer great insight. But the thing is, what works for one person need not necessarily work for you. You know the nature of your situation better than the author of the book. So it is better to stick to what works for you and keep improvising.
    And in the process spend time re-inventing the wheel and making mistakes they're not aware they're making.

    Look, if it works for one person, then guess what? It works. Why wouldn't it work for anyone else? Only if that someone else isn't comfortable with it; has a bias against it; their ego gets in the way; they would need to work on it and don't want to; it's out of their comfort zone and they'd prefer not to do it.

    Otherwise, if it were true, franchises couldn't exist. A franchisee must follow the recipe exactly, no matter who they are, where they are, what they prefer. May be completely foreign to their way of thinking. Maybe something they never would've come up with even with 100 years of "improvising." But if they follow the recipe exactly, they have a good chance of succeeding... because it'll work for them.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7991488].message }}
    • Profile picture of the author kenmichaels
      Originally Posted by misterme View Post

      The other thing about answering or overcoming objections is that popular culture makes it out to be all about converting nays to yeas but an objection can also lead to disqualifying the prospect.



      And in the process spend time re-inventing the wheel and making mistakes they're not aware they're making.

      Look, if it works for one person, then guess what? It works. Why wouldn't it work for anyone else? Only if that someone else isn't comfortable with it; has a bias against it; their ego gets in the way; they would need to work on it and don't want to; it's out of their comfort zone and they'd prefer not to do it.

      Otherwise, if it were true, franchises couldn't exist. A franchisee must follow the recipe exactly, no matter who they are, where they are, what they prefer. May be completely foreign to their way of thinking. Maybe something they never would've come up with even with 100 years of "improvising." But if they follow the recipe exactly, they have a good chance of succeeding... because it'll work for them.
      I am totally stealing that. I have been searching for a way to explain why
      scripts and fundamentals are so important.

      so far my way has been long winded and pretty convoluted.
      Comparing it franchises is genius. Thanks
      Signature

      Selling Ain't for Sissies!
      {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7991990].message }}
      • Profile picture of the author Claude Whitacre
        Originally Posted by kenmichaels View Post

        I am totally stealing that. I have been searching for a way to explain why
        scripts and fundamentals are so important.

        so far my way has been long winded and pretty convoluted.
        Comparing it franchises is genius. Thanks
        Not so fast!!!

        Last night I dreamed that I compared sales techniques to franchises. And don't tell me that there weren't witnesses. I dreamed that there were plenty of witnesses that heard me say it.


        Claude "Must be first, must be first" Whitacre
        Signature
        One Call Closing book https://www.amazon.com/One-Call-Clos...=1527788418&sr

        "When you look at someone through rose-colored glasses, all the red flags just look like flags" Bojack Horseman
        {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7992079].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author sethczerepak
    Hey Chris,

    I used to get this ALL the time when I first started in sales. I almost quit sales because of it.

    It's common with smart people who are good at convincing people, but not as strong in persuading them...but there's a difference. The best way to put it, I read a book by Dan Kennedy, just finished it this week, called "making them believe," and he said that making the person WANT to believe is more important than making them believe.

    When a person wants to believe, they'll talk themselves into it. It's an emotional commitment, the other intellectual. Overcoming objections just gives them permission to say yes, but the emotional persuasion is where you convince them to WANT to say yes. In my opinion, there's not enough good material out there about this subject, which is probably why people who master it are so damn successful.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7991604].message }}

Trending Topics