3 words to defeat ANY objection

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OK, so who here has trouble selling? Dealing with objections from customers either on the phone or face to face can be the hardest thing to overcome. Objections can be deal breakers. They can spark a tense atmosphere and things can get argumentative.

Here's a strategy that I use when dealing with people raising legitimate objections in the sales process.

All objections can be dealt with and I'll tell you now there are no true objections - I'm going to give you a rock solid strategy to answer ANY objection without getting into an argument.

All you have to do is remember the three FFFs?

Feel - I understand how you feel

Felt - Others have felt the same way

Found - What we have found is that by creating the right marketing campaign the overall cost is more than covered by the lifetime profit from just 2 new customers.

Acknowledge the objection. Tell them their objection is reasonable and one many people have raised. Then deliver the solution, which must be a reasonable solution as it has been tested on many people who raised the same objection.

Also when you are using the first two Fs you give yourself thinking time to come up with the final F.

By acknowledging their issues you are reasonable and helpful and understanding. So next time someone raises ANY objection use: Feel, Felt, Found.
#defeat #objection #words
  • Profile picture of the author Claude Whitacre
    Not a bad idea if you are new and have no idea how to actually answer an objection to lead to a sale.

    And you can only use it once per prospect, or you sound like an idiot.

    This is one of the many techniques that sound great..they have a patter to them...and they feel like they should work. They are catchy (The 3 F's)...

    But rarely work when actually put to use with a real buyer. They doesn't work because no matter how you use this, it doesn't address the problem you need to overcome.

    Another one is;

    "I didn't want to buy because of..."

    And you say "Well, that's the very reason you should buy!"

    It sounds great in sales training classes but doesn't translate well in front of a real person.


    The question you should always ask yourself when you get an objection...
    "Why in the world am I getting an objection at all, and why didn't I qualify in the beginning, so I could cover this in the presentation?"


    I will admit that the OP shows the best use of the technique, and explains it well.
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    • Profile picture of the author misterme
      Originally Posted by hisnibbs View Post

      All you have to do is remember the three FFFs?
      That's nine Fs you've got there. Three Fs << would be this. But I commend you on your proper use of not using an apostrophe to signify the plural.

      Feel - I understand how you feel

      Felt - Others have felt the same way

      Found - What we have found is that by creating the right marketing campaign the overall cost is more than covered by the lifetime profit from just 2 new customers.
      Oh, you forgot the emphatic fourth "F" said in frustration when this technique doesn't work.

      Besides which, it's not "what we've found..." The prospect doesn't care what you've found to be the case in their situation. You're talking about how others felt the same way. So then it's what "they've" found to be the solution that counts. Not what you've found. A small but significant difference.

      So it's, "Others have felt the same way. And what they found was by creating the right marketing campaign the overall cost is more than covered by the lifetime profit from just 2 new customers."

      But at best I've always found the Feel, Felt, Found technique establishes empathy toward the prospect maybe, but doesn't help change an objection. The objection isn't there because it's merely waiting for unknown unrelated third party case histories as told by the sales person to change the prospect's mind.

      Originally Posted by Claude Whitacre View Post

      Not a bad idea if you are new and have no idea how to actually answer an objection to lead to a sale.
      Bwahaha. Good one.

      Originally Posted by Claude Whitacre View Post

      The question you should always ask yourself when you get an objection...
      "Why in the world am I getting an objection at all, and why didn't I qualify in the beginning, so I could cover this in the presentation?"
      Right. Objections exist because the buyer isn't buying. And if they're not buying, it's not for lack of the right one or three line closing technique at the end. The reason has to be rooted in something earlier in the process.

      And a qualifying process at the start doesn't necessarily root it all out either. It could be something that comes up during the sales process itself.

      Sure, you can build in objection preempting to the most common objections you contend with. But you won't be able to cover every conceivable one that can ever come up because who knows what's going on behind closed doors? So the higher the price tag of what one's selling, the more one needs to find out if there's anything they're specifically concerned about so to cover their particular objection. The one(s) actually blocking the sale - not just the ones you assume are but which may not matter at all to the prospect.

      So even in the Feel, Felt, Found technique, there's that fundamental flaw: when the sales person proposes what others have found as the answer to the prospect's objection, what others have found may not matter at all to the prospect. You still need to zero in on exactly that which the prospect would need to hear specifically to have any major influence at all.
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      • Profile picture of the author Claude Whitacre
        Originally Posted by misterme View Post

        So even in the Feel, Felt, Found technique, there's that fundamental flaw: when the sales person proposes what others have found as the answer to the prospect's objection, what others have found may not matter at all to the prospect. You still need to zero in on exactly that which the prospect would need to hear specifically to have any major influence at all.
        Brilliant as always....especially when you agree with me. :rolleyes:

        One way to rush through possible objections is to ask questions at the beginning that will uncover these concerns.The reason you want to ask about their situation in the beginning is that the prospect won't know why you are asking the question, so they won't be defensive.

        Ready?

        I may ask 10 or 12 rapid fire questions before a presentation, to eliminate areas that don't apply...so I don't bring them up again. Also to identify concerns that I know I have to completely handle toward the beginning of the presentation..or even before I start the presentation.

        For a simple example; (selling a vacuum cleaner)

        "Do you have pets?" "No"
        "Do you have allergies?" "No"
        "Do you have carpeted steps?' "No"
        "Do you need this to vacuum bare floors to?" "No"
        "Do you have any Berber carpet?" "No"
        "Do you have any back or joint problems?" "Yes, I have a bad back"


        Me "Well, the reason I asked is that we have a machine specifically made for people with bad backs...right over here.."

        You see all those questions he said "No" to? They are all forgotten by the prospect...and I'll never bring them up again.

        So now the prospect is going to see the "Bad back vacuum cleaner". And he will feel like it's perfectly made for him.

        I can rattle off a dozen questions like that...as long as the prospect says "Yes" to one of my questions...we are off to the races.

        By the way, if they say "Yes" to the first question, I smile and file that away.

        So I may be showing them the exact vacuum for the person with "back problems, allergies, pets, fleas in their carpet, and shag carpeting"

        But I only summarize the situations they said "yes" to.

        If, at the end of the presentation they said "Yeah, if we had allergies...this would be the perfect vacuum for us...but we don't"
        It's because you failed to ask enough questions at the beginning.

        And now you are in "Oh yeah? But..." mode. Not a good place to be in.


        Genius is such a heavy burden. :rolleyes:
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        • Profile picture of the author mak25
          Originally Posted by Claude Whitacre View Post


          Genius is such a heavy burden. :rolleyes:
          I for one Claude, am very grateful for ALL of your posts.

          You give so much helpful advice and sales knowledge that this forum would be at a great loss without you.

          Unlike others here who toot their own horn and get all whiny and girlie-man when their offerings get challenged, you my man, are always a bright light shining.

          Keep giving Claude. You're my genius.
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        • Profile picture of the author mjbmedia
          Originally Posted by Claude Whitacre View Post

          Brilliant as always....especially when you agree with me. :rolleyes:

          One way to rush through possible objections is to ask questions at the beginning that will uncover these concerns.The reason you want to ask about their situation in the beginning is that the prospect won't know why you are asking the question, so they won't be defensive.

          Ready?

          I may ask 10 or 12 rapid fire questions before a presentation, to eliminate areas that don't apply...so I don't bring them up again. Also to identify concerns that I know I have to completely handle toward the beginning of the presentation..or even before I start the presentation.

          For a simple example; (selling a vacuum cleaner)

          "Do you have pets?" "No"
          "Do you have allergies?" "No"
          "Do you have carpeted steps?' "No"
          "Do you need this to vacuum bare floors to?" "No"
          "Do you have any Berber carpet?" "No"
          "Do you have any back or joint problems?" "Yes, I have a bad back"


          Me "Well, the reason I asked is that we have a machine specifically made for people with bad backs...right over here.."

          You see all those questions he said "No" to? They are all forgotten by the prospect...and I'll never bring them up again.

          So now the prospect is going to see the "Bad back vacuum cleaner". And he will feel like it's perfectly made for him.

          I can rattle off a dozen questions like that...as long as the prospect says "Yes" to one of my questions...we are off to the races.

          By the way, if they say "Yes" to the first question, I smile and file that away.

          So I may be showing them the exact vacuum for the person with "back problems, allergies, pets, fleas in their carpet, and shag carpeting"

          But I only summarize the situations they said "yes" to.

          If, at the end of the presentation they said "Yeah, if we had allergies...this would be the perfect vacuum for us...but we don't"
          It's because you failed to ask enough questions at the beginning.

          And now you are in "Oh yeah? But..." mode. Not a good place to be in.


          Genius is such a heavy burden. :rolleyes:
          I used this in double glazing sales very well and although when you read it, even me reading it now, I think ,did they really 'fall' for that, yes they do.

          Its like asking them to do a 1-5 survey where 1 is not at all important and 5 is vital, then sending them to a landing sales page focussing on their 5's
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  • Profile picture of the author bob ross
    might as well ben franklin their a$$ too
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    • Profile picture of the author Claude Whitacre
      Originally Posted by bob ross View Post

      might as well ben franklin their a$$ too
      I have heard of a couple guys using the "Ben Franklin Close" and making it work. I think Ken Michaels maybe.

      But I've tried it many times, when I first learned in out of a Tom Hopkins book...and I could never get it to further the sale. And I've never actually watched anyone use it effectively.

      It's another one of those ideas that look fantastic structurally, but don't really solve the problem.

      But I would believe it if a respected (by me) person said they made it work.


      One thing we are missing maybe is that "answers to objections" almost never get the sale on their own. If you get in the "answering objections" trap, you just end up arguing.

      Because you aren't changing their minds.

      Once you get an objection at the end of the presentation, they have decided not to buy. They are just being polite, and forming it as an objection.

      Most objections aren't the real reason they don't want to buy...so you play mental gymnastics until one of you gives up. Or until they get tired of playing.

      That's why it's so important to cover any objections in the presentation...or better yet...while you are qualifying.

      Making a sale by answering objections at the end of a sales presentation is like trying to swim up a waterfall.


      By the way, the "Feel, Felt, Found" idea may work if they have given you a "token" objection, but were really going to buy anyway.
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      • Profile picture of the author bob ross
        Originally Posted by Claude Whitacre View Post

        I have heard of a couple guys using the "Ben Franklin Close" and making it work. I think Ken Michaels maybe.

        But I've tried it many times, when I first learned in out of a Tom Hopkins book...and I could never get it to further the sale. And I've never actually watched anyone use it effectively.

        It's another one of those ideas that look fantastic structurally, but don't really solve the problem.

        But I would believe it if a respected (by me) person said they made it work.


        One thing we are missing maybe is that "answers to objections" almost never get the sale on their own. If you get in the "answering objections" trap, you just end up arguing.

        Because you aren't changing their minds.

        Once you get an objection at the end of the presentation, they have decided not to buy. They are just being polite, and forming it as an objection.

        Most objections aren't the real reason they don't want to buy...so you play mental gymnastics until one of you gives up. Or until they get tired of playing.

        That's why it's so important to cover any objections in the presentation...or better yet...while you are qualifying.

        Making a sale by answering objections at the end of a sales presentation is like trying to swim up a waterfall.


        By the way, the "Feel, Felt, Found" idea may work if they have given you a "token" objection, but were really going to buy anyway.
        Actually I think it may have been me mentioning the Ben Franklin close in a previous thread, I remember it vaguely.

        I do use the Ben Franklin, in B2C but never in B2B. And I never mention anything about Ben Franklin. You're right that a presentation should handle objections before they ever come up. I wonder how many people are actually designing their presentations with this in mind. Or how many here are actually even doing a solid presentation in the first place.

        I still believe in closing though and having solutions to any objection given. And more importantly, taking those fake objections and turning them into the real ones we can control and overcome.
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  • Profile picture of the author Claude Whitacre
    Originally Posted by hirechrisgunn View Post

    I've mentioned this in another post, but you can pretty much separate people into 4 blended categories. The GEMS course by Dani Johnson is stellar. It is directed more toward network marketers, but it is honestly applicable to families, friends, and general sales as well.
    I have sales courses. Is it OK to put links to my sales pages in the post too?

    I went to the sales page. A real stretch, man..a real stretch.
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    • Profile picture of the author hirechrisgunn
      Originally Posted by Claude Whitacre View Post

      I have sales courses. Is it OK to put links to my sales pages in the post too?

      I went to the sales page. A real stretch, man..a real stretch.
      Only a stretch if I was affiliated with it. I took the course, liked it and recommended it in a relevant post. I hate sales and it's not even my niche.
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      • Profile picture of the author Claude Whitacre
        Originally Posted by hirechrisgunn View Post

        Only a stretch if I was affiliated with it. I took the course, liked it and recommended it in a relevant post. I hate sales and it's not even my niche.
        Chris; I still think it was a stretch. But my tone was unwarranted. And you were only trying to help.

        I have an unconscious need to be in control. If I'm in a Mastermind Group, I act like it's my Mastermind Group. If I'm on a Forum, I think it's my responsibility to control the conversation.

        It makes me a great salesman, but it's irritating to peers. I'm working on it.
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  • Profile picture of the author PanteraIM
    I think it depends on what the objection is and where you hear it.

    It doesn't provide any new evidence for the prospect to change their minds about buying, so it's not really something you can use effectively at the end.

    However, I have used it effectively on many occasions to get permission to ask the prospect a few questions and qualify them. It's a good tool to use at the start to get past general sales resistance, I think.
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    • Profile picture of the author Claude Whitacre
      Originally Posted by PanteraIM View Post

      I think it depends on what the objection is and where you hear it.

      It doesn't provide any new evidence for the prospect to change their minds about buying, so it's not really something you can use effectively at the end.

      However, I have used it effectively on many occasions to get permission to ask the prospect a few questions and qualify them. It's a good tool to use at the start to get past general sales resistance, I think.

      That makes sense. Nicely done.
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  • Profile picture of the author DaniMc
    Wow thanks for taking me back. The three F's! Ben Franklin! Hadn't thought about those in a loooooong time.

    They used to work now and then.

    OP - Did you catch this from the Tony Robbins power to influence course? I think that is where I first heard the F's back in the day.
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    • I like the 3 F's approach. It has a practical leveling effect when dealing with any tense objection.

      This does not mean the seller is relieved of the responsibility to discover the prospect's motivation and how to satisfy his personal needs. Without the sense the seller is trying to help the prospect achieve his desire the3 F's will take one only so far towards a sale.

      LLS
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      • Profile picture of the author dee4d
        This is an interesting thread. Every time I read about selling, even when I am doing it for the umpteenth time, what I note is that every sale is unique. Handle it that way, and treat the customer as a unique individual, and study his feelings. At the end of the presentation, you will know whether you have the sale or not. I believe we all get better with every sale. And with the insights from Claude and Hisnibbs, selling should get more interesting!
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        • Profile picture of the author hisnibbs
          Like any "technique" it has to be used where appropriate and with skill and skill is honed with time and experience.

          Dan: I learnt this from a well respected colleague when selling very high end corporate ents packages. We'd get a sales call and have to close the person on the phone for packages in excess of £15K

          The "flow" of the call was never the same and even though taking charge of the sale etc. because you were not in the room the caller would frequently jump in with objections. The callers were used to being in charge and in control so we had to allow them feel top dogs otherwise they'd feel out of their comfort zone and many were sellers themselves.

          Feel, Felt, Found was always a good one that helped to get the prospect feeling like we were onside. You have to modify it though, like any technique, using just straight out the box is weak. But making it work by adapting it to you situation is where the strength lies.

          It's about having a toolbox, not just one tool. Having many strategies and skills and honing them over many years. It's about assessing the failures and not just celebrating the successes.

          Over the years all the skills, tricks, tips, strategies, ideas and techniques I have learned are now combined into my approach and I'd say if you were with a prospect and you suddenly thought "Oh I know I'll us X or Y" it'll come off as pre-prepared and a little forced.

          The thing I would say is get comfortable talking to people, strangers, anyone. Walking up to them and striking up a conversation. If you want to hone your people skills try flyering the general public at the Edinburgh Festival during August. In one hour you'll learn more than a sales trainer can teach you in the same time. Rejection, failure, hostility, success, joy, laughter, weirdness it's all there :-)

          But I understand that you are sceptical of any technique. A lot of the people I have spoken to about this technique felt the same way. But if you blend it into your overall skillset you'll always find a way to use it when meeting an objection... ;-)
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  • Profile picture of the author mjbmedia
    If somebody told me they 'understood how I felt' Id say 'clearly you don't' as I punched them ,'else you'd have moved out the way quicker' . :-)
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  • Profile picture of the author NewParadigm
    It does work well as a structure, you just don't have to use the 3 F words to avoid being repetitive.

    instead of feel/felt, say Oh yeah Ive heard that before many times from similar businesses in your situation.

    instead of found, say here's what we did to help them..... increase their sales by an average of 23% over the next year with my program.

    It's more of the process and not the exact words. Acknowledge their objection, sometimes they are just throw-away objections so you'll need to dig deeper. Let them know they are not alone and in good company. And that others in similar position took action and achieved X results.
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  • Profile picture of the author bob ross
    Claude is awesome for sure.

    Hey Claude, I use 'market survey's' as a cover for that questionnaire strategy you mentioned. Same type of questions only geared to windows & siding, so that you can hit on the points that will push their hot buttons.

    there are 16 questions on my market survey (remodeling company) and some notable ones that you'll appreciate are:

    "have you ever considered replacement windows before?
    "if yes, what stopped you from having it done?"
    "do you feel your present windows waste expensive energy"

    these questions are like bullets that are getting ready to go straight to their brains.

    One thing I wanted to mention at the end of my list (and I wonder if you've used the same) is the question:

    If and when you replace your windows, how many times would you like to do it?

    Obviously you extract an answer of "once". Then in the demo the product is shown to be a forever-lasting product while all the other options will likely need to be done twice or more.

    And later on you simply use their own words against them... "Now Jim, you told me earlier that you only wanted to do this ONCE right?..."


    The ol' Cialdini commitment and consistency is so powerful.
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    • Profile picture of the author Claude Whitacre
      Originally Posted by bob ross View Post

      Claude is awesome for sure.

      Hey Claude, I use 'market survey's' as a cover for that questionnaire strategy you mentioned. Same type of questions only geared to windows & siding, so that you can hit on the points that will push their hot buttons.

      there are 16 questions on my market survey (remodeling company) and some notable ones that you'll appreciate are:

      "have you ever considered replacement windows before?
      "if yes, what stopped you from having it done?"
      "do you feel your present windows waste expensive energy"


      these questions are like bullets that are getting ready to go straight to their brains.

      One thing I wanted to mention at the end of my list (and I wonder if you've used the same) is the question:

      If and when you replace your windows, how many times would you like to do it?

      Obviously you extract an answer of "once". Then in the demo the product is shown to be a forever-lasting product while all the other options will likely need to be done twice or more.

      And later on you simply use their own words against them... "Now Jim, you told me earlier that you only wanted to do this ONCE right?..."


      The ol' Cialdini commitment and consistency is so powerful.

      "have you ever considered replacement windows before?
      "if yes, what stopped you from having it done?"
      "do you feel your present windows waste expensive energy"


      I like questionnaires because they won't let you forget the questions and they look official.

      What do you do after they answer the question? Do you just go to the next one? Or do you say "Tell me about that" or something to draw them out?

      In other words, do you expand what they say right then, or save it for the presentation?

      Do you always ask every question, even if they really show interest in one question on the questionnaire?


      And later on you simply use their own words against them... "Now Jim, you told me earlier that you only wanted to do this ONCE right?..."

      I used to use something similar. If they are going to buy (or at least leaning that way) it slightly strengthens your position. But if they are hesitating, it can be felt as a point of pressure by the prospect.

      That consistency thing works really well if the commitments are close together.

      If you get a committing answer at the beginning of the presentation...and bring it up at the end to remind them of their commitment...it has lost most of its power.

      I used to (years ago) ask at the beginning of the presentation; "At the end, if you like what you see...could you afford a $50 a month payment starting in 3 months?".

      They would look at each other and say "Yes, sure"

      But by the time I was done, if they hadn't decided to buy..and I brought this up? (the commitment for $50 a month) they would just say "Well, I didn't mean now" or "Well, we would have to think it over". So the power was spent because they were in a different emotional state than at the beginning.

      Your consistency idea works, but really only if they want what you are selling.
      In the Cialdini book, the thing sold was very inexpensive....and there were other factors at work (like trying to impress a young girl)


      If you are going to use your If and when you replace your windows, how many times would you like to do it? ..I would use it several times in the presentation, showing the contrast between cheap windows and lifetime windows....to keep their consistency fresh in their mind.



      Anyway, thanks guys..for the compliment.
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      • Profile picture of the author bob ross
        I like questionnaires because they won't let you forget the questions and they look official.

        Yeah definitely. It's a great way to be able to ask a ton of questions that would seriously raise their guard if it wasn't being read as a simple questionnaire. My guys are trained to act as if it's just a simple survey that the company requires them to fill out quick. In reality, it's one of the most crucial parts of the presentation of course.


        What do you do after they answer the question? Do you just go to the next one? Or do you say "Tell me about that" or something to draw them out?

        Depends on the flow of everything but for the most part it's only used for gathering information to use later.

        I used to use something similar. If they are going to buy (or at least leaning that way) it slightly strengthens your position. But if they are hesitating, it can be felt as a point of pressure by the prospect. If you get a committing answer at the beginning of the presentation...and bring it up at the end to remind them of their commitment...it has lost most of its power.

        Right, which is why the commitments are mostly brought back up during the presentation and when the pricing is ready to be given.


        I used to (years ago) ask at the beginning of the presentation; "At the end, if you like what you see...could you afford a $50 a month payment starting in 3 months?".

        They would look at each other and say "Yes, sure"

        But by the time I was done, if they hadn't decided to buy..and I brought this up? (the commitment for $50 a month) they would just say "Well, I didn't mean now" or "Well, we would have to think it over". So the power was spent because they were in a different emotional state than at the beginning.

        Yeah I can see that playing some serious mind games with you (the sales rep). I couldn't even imagine doing that.


        Your consistency idea works, but really only if they want what you are selling.
        In the Cialdini book, the thing sold was very inexpensive....and there were other factors at work (like trying to impress a young girl)

        It's been a while since I've last read the book but I don't remember the young girl example. I also don't remember inexpensive things being used, although it's definitely possible I just can't recall that. I remember it more about how powerful peoples words, stances, and opinions are once they're "on the record" voicing it; and how that it can be used against them to be influenced.

        Preventing and saving cancels is a good example of using it. Preventing the cancel: "Jim, now if you have any doubts about doing this now is the time to tell me. If you have the slightest doubt in your mind about doing this you'd tell me right? And are you like me and a man of your word?"

        I personally found commitment and consistency to be the most interesting part of the book. I really should read it again. The lengths that people will go to remain consistent with what they said earlier is an amazing phenomenon.



        If you are going to use your If and when you replace your windows, how many times would you like to do it? ..I would use it several times in the presentation, showing the contrast between cheap windows and lifetime windows....to keep their consistency fresh in their mind.

        Yes definitely, you're right. All the commitments should be brought up multiple times when you're killing the alternatives or selling them on your advantages.


        Here's a question that really helped me (modified for windows)

        "Do you see how these windows would save on your heating bills?"
        "Do you like the idea of saving on your heating bills?"
        "If you were ever going to start saving money on your heating bill...when would be the best time to start?"

        All good for sure. I use "If you were ever going to start saving money, when is a good time to start?" pretty often.

        You want them to say "Now" a time or two in the presentation.
        But like the "Feel, Felt, Found" idea, using it often with the same prospect will sound strange.

        Here's a really powerful question we give the prospect after energy audits are done (an energy audit creates an actual forecast of what kind of energy can be saved, not a fake one)....

        Say the amount should be $134 per month in fuel savings according to the computer model when the energy audit is done:

        "Jim, if you saw $5 laying down on the floor would you pick it up?".
        "Jim, if you saw $50 laying down on the floor would you pick it up?".
        "Jim, if you saw $134 per month laying down on the floor would you pick it up or what!?"

        if they say yes (which they should) you can go right into a handshake and assume the sale.

        do you assume the sale Claude? I'm guessing you do but I'm curious.
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        • Profile picture of the author ewenmack
          In the old book Tested Sentences That Sell http://www.ultimateinsurancesystem.c...%20Wheeler.pdf
          shoe shops were trained to see what sentence the counter girls said
          would sell more inner soles.

          The winner was...

          "Are you on your feet a lot?"

          Virtually every man and women would say yes.

          At that point the cashier would pull out a pair of inner soles
          and say...

          "These are made especially for men/women
          who are on their feet a lot.
          They are $x, shall I add them to your bag?

          It was hard to resist when something is especially made for
          what they just agreed upon and made for the same sex.

          This is consistency in action from Influence.

          In the book they trialled it on charity collectors and getting home owners to
          allow big signs to go up on their lawns. They first asked if they believed in something.

          Not agreeing would seem very un-charitable.

          So they were really set up.

          Best,
          Ewen
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  • Profile picture of the author helisell
    Mr Customer we have a range of 127 different vacuum cleaners ranging from $100 all the way up to $5,000. I'm certain we'll have one that is perfect for you. Would it be ok to ask you a few questions to see which one would be best for you.

    That sentence (or a variation of..) will put YOU in complete control of the situation.

    Added P.S. Assuming they have been qualified as being in the market (i.e. visited the store or whatever)
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    • Profile picture of the author Claude Whitacre
      Originally Posted by helisell View Post

      Mr Customer we have a range of 127 different vacuum cleaners ranging from $100 all the way up to $5,000. I'm certain we'll have one that is perfect for you. Would it be ok to ask you a few questions to see which one would be best for you.

      That sentence (or a variation of..) will put YOU in complete control of the situation.

      Added P.S. Assuming they have been qualified as being in the market (i.e. visited the store or whatever)
      Did I write this somewhere before?

      Yup, before any questions I say "We have about 120 vacuums to chose from. Do you mind if I ask a few questions to narrow it down to a few models?"

      And then I start the qualifying questions.

      Originally Posted by bob ross View Post

      do you assume the sale Claude? I'm guessing you do but I'm curious.[/B]
      Sort of.

      During the presentation, it's clear that I expect them to buy from me. And I make it clear that most people buy. I do it subtly. But the image is clear.

      I don't skip the step where you ask a real closing question (which I assume is what you mean by "assuming the sale").

      I ask "Is that OK?" or "Is this alright?". If they say "Yes", I take it as though they are buying, and they usually mean that they are.

      I think sometimes salespeople assume the sale by starting to write something up before the prospect is at that stage...and it creates an uncomfortable tension....and the beginnings of objections.

      I had a rep that just assumed the sale without asking a closing question, and it worked pretty well. I think the secret is to not make the closing question a big deal. Don't change voice inflection. Don't change body posture.

      Some people ask closing questions almost like a verbal attack. They lean forward, lower their voice, speak slower, and look intently at the buyer. That sets up all kinds of warning bells to the customer.

      If I were a buyer, and you said "Jim, if you saw $134 per month laying down on the floor would you pick it up or what!?"...and I said "Sure"...

      If you took that to mean I bought and just took out the form, and started writing it up...it would irritate me. I may not stop you, if I were going to buy anyway, but it would irritate me.

      Asking if they would pick up money isn't a buying signal. Everyone is going to say "Yes". And to them, there is no connection to picking up money and buying. It "works" because they were going to buy anyway.

      I may ask "Do you really see how this would save you $134 a month?" "Yes"

      "Well, the earliest I could start saving you that money would be next month. Is that early enough for you?" Now, if they say "Yes" they know they are buying. But the question itself has no hard edges and almost sounds silly. it also frames the thought as "earlier is better".

      Just a thought.

      And maybe I misunderstood what you meant about "assuming the sale"


      By the way, in the "consistency" Cialdini experiment (one of them anyway) it was a good looking girl selling tickets to a play or classical music concert. She would ask if they liked classical music. The guy would say "Yes" because he thought it would impress the girl. Then she would offer tickets. He would have to buy (or at least appear interested) to maintain the consistency of his story.

      This is from memory, and it could be off a tad.
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      • Profile picture of the author mjbmedia
        Originally Posted by Claude Whitacre View Post

        Did I write this somewhere before?

        Yup, before any questions I say "We have about 120 vacuums to chose from. Do you mind if I ask a few questions to narrow it down to a few models?"

        And then I start the qualifying questions.
        Interesting, we can deliver about 120 ways you could engage your prospects on and offline, how many ways are you using at the moment?

        5 !

        5 is pretty good but look there's all that pile of money being left on that massive table......... do you want some (more) of it?
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        • Profile picture of the author Claude Whitacre
          Originally Posted by mjbmedia View Post

          Interesting, we can deliver about 120 ways you could engage your prospects on and offline, how many ways are you using at the moment?

          5 !

          5 is pretty good but look there's all that pile of money being left on that massive table......... do you want some (more) of it?
          Dear Mike: I sell 120 different models of vacuum cleaners in a retail store. These aren't marketing methods. These aren't appeals...just vacuum cleaners.

          I'm not sure where you get the number "5" for ways I engage clients, but it sounds about right. Am I leaving money on the table? Absolutely. Could I do more? Yup.

          Am I making more money than I need? Yes.

          Yours truly. Claudius
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          • Profile picture of the author mjbmedia
            Originally Posted by Claude Whitacre View Post

            Dear Mike: I sell 120 different models of vacuum cleaners in a retail store. These aren't marketing methods. These aren't appeals...just vacuum cleaners.

            I'm not sure where you get the number "5" for ways I engage clients, but it sounds about right. Am I leaving money on the table? Absolutely. Could I do more? Yup.

            Am I making more money than I need? Yes.

            Yours truly. Claudius
            HAHA I wasn't pitching you mate, just thinking out loud of how to use that approach for me and envisaging a conversation with a prospect using it.

            Still good that you noticed me
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      • Profile picture of the author misterme
        [Claude Whitacre & bob ross]
        What do you do after they answer the question? Do you just go to the next one? Or do you say "Tell me about that" or something to draw them out?

        Depends on the flow of everything but for the most part it's only used for gathering information to use later.

        MisterMe: I turn it into a short conversation to get them to explain how it impacts them. Depending on the answer I may also use it as an opportunity to briefly connect with them to build rapport. Otherwise a sequence of questions can come off as an interrogation.

        [Claude Whitacre & bob ross]
        I used to (years ago) ask at the beginning of the presentation; "At the end, if you like what you see...could you afford a $50 a month payment starting in 3 months?".

        They would look at each other and say "Yes, sure"

        But by the time I was done, if they hadn't decided to buy..and I brought this up? (the commitment for $50 a month) they would just say "Well, I didn't mean now" or "Well, we would have to think it over". So the power was spent because they were in a different emotional state than at the beginning.

        Yeah I can see that playing some serious mind games with you (the sales rep). I couldn't even imagine doing that.


        MisterMe: I wouldn't call it a mind game. At the beginning, a lot of people have a "yeah sure, whatever" attitude because nothing's happened, there's no hard promise required. But when the moment comes to put their money where their mouth is, now it's for real. Now they feel it. So now they wiggle out.

        Originally Posted by ewenmack View Post

        "Are you on your feet a lot?"

        Virtually every man and women would say yes.

        At that point the cashier would pull out a pair of inner soles
        and say...

        "These are made especially for men/women
        who are on their feet a lot.
        They are , shall I add them to your bag?

        It was hard to resist when something is especially made for
        what they just agreed upon and made for the same sex.

        This is consistency in action from Influence.

        In the book they trialled it on charity collectors and getting home owners to
        allow big signs to go up on their lawns. They first asked if they believed in something.

        Not agreeing would seem very un-charitable.
        From my reading, I'm not sure that's the correct take. Cialdini's "Consistency" was about behaving congruent with previous behavior, said previous behavior establishing the pattern for the latter behavior.

        Whereas a person stating something about themselves (I'm on my feet all day) and being offered a product apparently tailor made for them, and them inclined to buying it, is more about "Specificity" isn't it? Meaning that the person feels this is the right product for them and so, more inclined to purchase it.

        "Consistency" applied to the soles sale would be more like the sales clerk asks if the customer believes that the more comfortable their feet feel, so goes the body. The customer replies in the affirmative and the sales person then introduces the inner sole item and asks if they'd buy it. According to Cialdini, there should be more buyers than when the customer is NOT first asked the foot comfort question.

        According to Dan Kennedy, if a six foot tall, 300 pound truck driver is asked if driving in a truck all day hurts his back and he says yes, then given a choice between a regular seat pad and one he's informed is tailor made for six foot tall 300 pound truck drivers, he's more apt to buy - and even pay more for - the tailor made seat pad because he feels it was made for people just like him and therefore has exactly what he needs in it.

        Originally Posted by Claude Whitacre View Post

        I think sometimes salespeople assume the sale by starting to write something up before the prospect is at that stage...and it creates an uncomfortable tension....and the beginnings of objections.

        I had a rep that just assumed the sale without asking a closing question, and it worked pretty well. I think the secret is to not make the closing question a big deal. Don't change voice inflection. Don't change body posture.

        Some people ask closing questions almost like a verbal attack. They lean forward, lower their voice, speak slower, and look intently at the buyer. That sets up all kinds of warning bells to the customer.

        If I were a buyer, and you said "Jim, if you saw $134 per month laying down on the floor would you pick it up or what!?"...and I said "Sure"...

        If you took that to mean I bought and just took out the form, and started writing it up...it would irritate me. I may not stop you, if I were going to buy anyway, but it would irritate me.

        Asking if they would pick up money isn't a buying signal. Everyone is going to say "Yes". And to them, there is no connection to picking up money and buying. It "works" because they were going to buy anyway.

        I may ask "Do you really see how this would save you $134 a month?" "Yes"

        "Well, the earliest I could start saving you that money would be next month. Is that early enough for you?" Now, if they say "Yes" they know they are buying.
        That's an excellent distinction and observation about how some people erroneously assume the sale.

        Reaching out with a handshake when they say something agreeable can work to seal a deal if they're sold on it, but when they haven't made a mental decision to take ownership first they'll likely cross their arms when you reach out to shake their hand.
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        • Profile picture of the author Claude Whitacre
          Originally Posted by misterme View Post


          That's an excellent distinction and observation about how some people erroneously assume the sale.

          Reaching out with a handshake when they say something agreeable can work to seal a deal if they're sold on it, but when they haven't made a mental decision to take ownership first they'll likely cross their arms when you reach out to shake their hand.
          The handshake thing? I do it when selling my offline services, but not in my store. Don't know why.

          But yeah, you better be sure they mean "Yes" or it causes the conversation to go down the wrong path.

          One thing I'll do that really strengthens my "Is that OK?" close...

          After the guy (I always ask the man first) says "Sure", I ask the wife, if available, "Is that OK with you too?" If she says "Yes" then it's a real cemented sale.

          Why do I ask "Is that OK with you too?"
          (Gather around folks. This is pretty good stuff, If I do say so myself. And I do.) :rolleyes:

          I want the husband to hear the wife say "Yes". That gives him an excuse to go ahead, and takes away the "We need to think about it" idea.

          It also makes it easier for the wife to say "Yes", because the husband just said "Yes".

          And now they are sharing the burden of the decision, and they feel less like they each had to decide by themselves.
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          • Profile picture of the author kenmichaels
            Originally Posted by Claude Whitacre View Post

            The handshake thing? I do it when selling my offline services, but not in my store. Don't know why.

            But yeah, you better be sure they mean "Yes" or it causes the conversation to go down the wrong path.

            One thing I'll do that really strengthens my "Is that OK?" close...

            After the guy (I always ask the man first) says "Sure", I ask the wife, if available, "Is that OK with you too?" If she says "Yes" then it's a real cemented sale.

            Why do I ask "Is that OK with you too?"
            (Gather around folks. This is pretty good stuff, If I do say so myself. And I do.) :rolleyes:

            I want the husband to hear the wife say "Yes". That gives him an excuse to go ahead, and takes away the "We need to think about it" idea.

            It also makes it easier for the wife to say "Yes", because the husband just said "Yes".

            And now they are sharing the burden of the decision, and they feel less like they each had to decide by themselves.
            That surprises me, why the man? why not the one who gave you
            all the "I am the decision maker signals" ...

            I really don't like the selling process when it involves more then one
            person ... for my way of selling it messes up the flow. I have to say extra,
            pay attention to who showing buying signals who is one page while
            the other is on a different page or just missed something critical.

            and the worse ... that odd question from the ( not decision maker )
            at the precise wrong moment. I lost sales from that, before I
            learned that if they are in the room .... hand walk them through it
            same as everyone else.

            Still don't like it, pain in the ass.

            I like flow, I like the get in, get out, get on with your next lead approach.
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            • Profile picture of the author Claude Whitacre
              Originally Posted by kenmichaels View Post

              That surprises me, why the man? why not the one who gave you all the "I am the decision maker signals" ...
              Ken; Brother....Friend....Mentor....Genius......

              It's even more complicated than that. At the beginning of a presentation, the husband is usually the more adamant that they will not buy. Arms crossed, bored, wanting to watch TV instead. In the store, he's the one who doesn't want to be there. The wife is usually more reserved and nicer. As the presentation flows, that shifts. The husband gets more excited, asks more questions, shows more buying signals. The wife usually is still more polite...and is less influenced by my presentation.

              Why? Two reasons. Women are better at noticing subtle signals that I'm not really bonding with them. Guys don't notice it as much. If they have kids, it's more noticeable. The littlest bit of impatience crossing my face will kill any rapport with the wife. And again, guys won't notice.

              So, by the end of the presentation, the man is generally (but not always) more on my side.

              But that's not the only reason I ask the man first. I never want there to be a hint, in any way that I'm interested in the wife...other than as a customer.

              And there is the Decision maker...and the one that is more excited about buying. Sometimes they are the same person, sometimes not.

              The only time I'll ask the wife first...is if she is the decision maker and the one more interested in buying. I want my first question "Is that OK?" to get a "Yes". So, I'll ask the one most likely to say "Yes", usually the husband.

              And it usually took more work to bring the husband around, because he started at a negative.


              Originally Posted by kenmichaels View Post

              I really don't like the selling process when it involves more then one
              person ... for my way of selling it messes up the flow. I have to say extra,
              pay attention to who showing buying signals who is one page while
              the other is on a different page or just missed something critical.

              and the worse ... that odd question from the ( not decision maker )
              at the precise wrong moment. I lost sales from that, before I
              learned that if they are in the room .... hand walk them through it
              same as everyone else.


              Still don't like it, pain in the ass.

              I like flow, I like the get in, get out, get on with your next lead approach.
              To me, couples are a little easier to sell, because I can get them each to say to the other one that they want to buy. And emotions and motivations are more verbalized. They give each other glances, frown at each other, talk to each other in front of me, and generally make it easier to read them.

              Single people sometimes are lost in thought, or are just listening, and I have little feedback to go on.

              Of course, on the phone...all this is reversed. I'm talking about in person selling.

              I don't mind the sudden hard question at the end from someone in the room. Far better if it happens while I'm there.
              What makes it difficult is if company comes, and then I have to bring them up to speed while keeping the original couple interested.

              I can do it, but it's extra work. I will say though, that I can almost always get the new people to recommend that the couple buys. I leave hints that they may be able to borrow it, or that the sale will somehow benefit them.

              Selling my online service to business owners? It's more treating them both like partners. And then I will ask the dominate one first. And that's usually the one more interested anyway.

              This is convoluted play. Much of it isn't conscious, as I know you already know.
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              • Profile picture of the author misterme
                Originally Posted by Claude Whitacre View Post

                So, by the end of the presentation, the man is generally (but not always) more on my side.

                And there is the Decision maker...and the one that is more excited about buying. Sometimes they are the same person, sometimes not.

                The only time I'll ask the wife first...is if she is the decision maker and the one more interested in buying. I want my first question "Is that OK?" to get a "Yes". So, I'll ask the one most likely to say "Yes", usually the husband.
                So... when the husband converts to an interested prospect, does that classify him as the "more interested in buying" or is he considered the decision maker (whose interest you've gained)?

                And... what happens should you ask the wife first?

                Interesting stuff, Claude.

                As you know, I'm forever selling couples. Traditionally the rule has been sell to the ladies, because the thinking is it's her and her mom who'll rule the day and tell the fellas to cough up the dough (Geez, I'm really beginning to sound more and more like my avatar)...

                BUT more and more guys are getting involved in the sales consult, which is fine by me. I also experience that male bonding thing yet try not to do that.

                AND when it comes to decisions, tradition holds that the guy kills the sale (after I leave) because he doesn't want to pay that much. Even though she may want it.

                Which is why I've always had her say what she wants so he can hear it. Some guys will buy because they want her to be happy.

                So in my mind, the guy's the decision maker and she's the one most interested.

                But if I'm correct about that, then you're saying get the OK from the decision maker first. Do I have that right?

                I'd like to try it if I have the right understanding of it.

                Because I can see where if I ask the guy first, and he's the guy who'll kill the sale, that asking him first might possible prompt him to turn to her and ask what she thinks.

                He could just as easily say it's too much money but that's ok because that's something I can recover from.

                *** One more thought: When the guy becomes "interested" - isn't that sometimes him feigning interest to involve himself into the conversation so that he can deflect the sale (whether it's because he's not interested, opposed or being protective)?
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                • Profile picture of the author Claude Whitacre
                  Originally Posted by misterme View Post

                  So... when the husband converts to an interested prospect, does that classify him as the "more interested in buying" or is he considered the decision maker (whose interest you've gained)?

                  And... what happens should you ask the wife first?

                  Interesting stuff, Claude.
                  Boy, Now we are in the deep weeds! "The more interested in buy" and "The decision maker" are two separate things that may be in the same person, maybe not. In your example the husband is "the more interested in buying."

                  The decision maker is the one (I know you know this) who is dominate in the relationship. Sometimes it's hard to tell who that is. I've talked to men that control everything in the conversation, and cut off the wife in mid-sentence. But at the end of the presentation, a glance from her, and he completely "changes his mind". I know you know what I mean.

                  But I just go with the one that is more interested, and hopefully that helps pull the other one along for the ride. That's usually the man, although not always.

                  When I ask the wife first, I change it a little. I say "Is this OK with you?' and after she says "Yes", I ask the guy "Will you help her get it?". I'm not sure if it makes a difference, but that's what I do.

                  It does matter if both have full time jobs. That may change the dynamic a little.


                  Originally Posted by misterme View Post

                  As you know, I'm forever selling couples. Traditionally the rule has been sell to the ladies, because the thinking is it's her and her mom who'll rule the day and tell the fellas to cough up the dough (Geez, I'm really beginning to sound more and more like my avatar)...

                  BUT more and more guys are getting involved in the sales consult, which is fine by me. I also experience that male bonding thing yet try not to do that.
                  Of course, for your offer, the woman is the prime mover. In in-home sales of vacuum cleaners, it can be either. But the man tends to be the decision maker, at least by a small margin. Why would you not want to bond with the guy? It would seem that he's the one you need to win over. Am I right, or not?


                  Originally Posted by misterme View Post

                  AND when it comes to decisions, tradition holds that the guy kills the sale (after I leave) because he doesn't want to pay that much. Even though she may want it.

                  Which is why I've always had her say what she wants so he can hear it. Some guys will buy because they want her to be happy.

                  So in my mind, the guy's the decision maker and she's the one most interested.

                  But if I'm correct about that, then you're saying get the OK from the decision maker first. Do I have that right?
                  In your case,asking the girl first makes the most sense. She is very likely the real one deciding, and is almost certainly the most interested. But I would (as I'm sure you do) take the time to let it sink in for the groom that it's the right decision. This would come after they sign. If he's going to bolt, you want it done while you're still there, am I right?


                  Originally Posted by misterme View Post

                  I'd like to try it if I have the right understanding of it.

                  Because I can see where if I ask the guy first, and he's the guy who'll kill the sale, that asking him first might possible prompt him to turn to her and ask what she thinks.

                  He could just as easily say it's too much money but that's ok because that's something I can recover from.
                  I wouldn't take that chance. I'd just ask the lady first.

                  Originally Posted by misterme View Post

                  *** One more thought: When the guy becomes "interested" - isn't that sometimes him feigning interest to involve himself into the conversation so that he can deflect the sale (whether it's because he's not interested, opposed or being protective)?
                  In my experience, it's never happened. (That I remember, anyway)
                  But I have had the wife pull that. It's very rare and takes a passive aggressive relationship that most couples don't have.

                  But your offer may lend itself more to that, I don't know. My guess is that, if you see interest develop..it's genuine. If he's over the top from the start, it may be gamesmanship.


                  Smart, smart stuff being brought up here.
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  • Profile picture of the author shawnlebrun
    I've personally found that one "F" works best for me when selling in person.

    I'll "F you up" if you don't buy this has always worked well for me.

    I kid, I kid.
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  • Profile picture of the author Brandon Tanner
    Originally Posted by hisnibbs View Post

    3 words to defeat ANY objection
    "Like another beer?"

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  • Profile picture of the author misterme
    Originally Posted by Claude Whitacre View Post

    the man tends to be the decision maker, at least by a small margin. Why would you not want to bond with the guy? It would seem that he's the one you need to win over. Am I right, or not?
    Because in my industry, given the nature of my service and what I'm entrusted to get for her, the woman wants to feel she has that personal bond with me. That you're not going to be yet another one of the boys and then perhaps be insensitive to her wants on her day and act all alpha.

    Originally Posted by Claude Whitacre View Post

    But I would (as I'm sure you do) take the time to let it sink in for the groom that it's the right decision. This would come after they sign. If he's going to bolt, you want it done while you're still there, am I right?
    Ideally, and you can only try to get them to sign while you're there. But odds are they're not going to sign on the spot. Today's millennial are ultra, ultra, ULTRA sensitive to any attempt like that and instantly turn off if you try it. I use a lot of pre selling, but that leads them to the water which a lot of them will not drink (educational materials like blog posts, articles, testimonials). I do bring it all up in my presentation though. Sometimes I create the space for them to discuss privately but they don't come to a decision that readily, especially if they're still looking at options. That's human nature. Things are different with these younger ones. I sense the Force with them...

    I'm always looking for how it can be done softly.

    Originally Posted by Claude Whitacre View Post

    But I have had the wife pull that.
    Women are taught early on to quickly weed out people. It happens in dating, for example. It applies to business as well. On a first date, they'll casually ask, for example, about previous relationships and encourage the guy to tell all, assuring him that he can feel free to speak. The guy thinks he's found a woman who's truly interested and sympathetic to him, and starts talking about his ex.

    If you haven't figured it out by now, what she's really doing is seeing if he speaks about his ex or refuses to, and how he speaks about her if he does. Is he a great guy and says "she was wonderful. It simply wasn't the right time" and changes the subject. OR... is he bitter and sarcastic? Then maybe he'll talk about the new woman some day like that too. Is he over the ex? Because then he's not emotionally available for a relationship. Does he unintentionally reveal how he mishandled the relationship? Does what he says show that he has emotional issues, such as being a control freak, insecure, jealous, immature? Then he's not good relationship material.

    She sits there smiling, taking mental notes. And when he says, "Gee I'm talking too much... or... I don't know if I should say this..." She urges him to continue. But thinking, "More rope to hang himself with. This guy is no gentleman. Hello? You see me here or not? He won't shut up about talking trash about his ex."

    Most guys don't know to screen a potential date in this manner when they meet a woman. As long as she's cute that's all they see. They love to talk about themselves instead and need little or no prompting.

    So when it comes to a business call - - - it's the same stuff going on. She's doing her recon.

    But this never happened to me because I'm usually the one asking questions and I'm more like Bogey, which is why I chose him for my avatar.
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    • Profile picture of the author Claude Whitacre
      Originally Posted by misterme View Post

      Because in my industry, given the nature of my service and what I'm entrusted to get for her, the woman wants to feel she has that personal bond with me. That you're not going to be yet another one of the boys and then perhaps be insensitive to her wants on her day and act all alpha.



      Ideally, and you can only try to get them to sign while you're there. But odds are they're not going to sign on the spot. Today's millennial are ultra, ultra, ULTRA sensitive to any attempt like that and instantly turn off if you try it.
      WOW! That sure was a lot to absorb from one post.

      I get that. Yeah, different market and dynamic than I'm used to.
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      "Be kind. For everyone you meet is fighting a hard battle".....Ian Maclaren
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    • Profile picture of the author ewenmack
      Originally Posted by misterme View Post

      Because in my industry, given the nature of my service and what I'm entrusted to get for her, the woman wants to feel she has that personal bond with me. That you're not going to be yet another one of the boys and then perhaps be insensitive to her wants on her day and act all alpha.
      Great insight.

      What I read into it [may be wrong] is that she wants, desires understanding first.

      Because if you don't understand, there's no way can you
      be her aid to her most important day of her life.

      That's her thinking.

      And if you are sensitive to her feelings, you wouldn't be a jackass and
      doing the male bonding thing.

      Ever heard a woman in frustration blurt out...

      "You just don't understand!".

      Oh the power of understanding!

      Best,
      Ewen
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  • Profile picture of the author misterme
    Yeah, I apologize. The nuances of our respective sales were intriguing to me and I got a little carried away. I realize too I wandered from the official thread topic. I feel sometimes there's a topic within a topic to talk about, and others have felt those sub topics should be further explored too. And we've all found doing so from time to time can yield benefits.
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  • Profile picture of the author Aaron Doud
    I understand that you FEEL that this thread has gone off topic.
    Many others have FELT that way as well.
    What they (BTW proper use of this method is they not we just an FYI) have FOUND is that Claude is to blame.

    I saw this thread right after it was posted and I am so glad I didn't reply. Nothing I would have said could have been as golden as what this thread turned into.
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    • Profile picture of the author Claude Whitacre
      Originally Posted by Aaron Doud View Post

      I understand that you FEEL that this thread has gone off topic.
      Many others have FELT that way as well.
      What they (BTW proper use of this method is they not we just an FYI) have FOUND is that Claude is to blame.

      I saw this thread right after it was posted and I am so glad I didn't reply. Nothing I would have said could have been as golden as what this thread turned into.
      I agree. Misterme, Bob Ross, You, Of course Ken Michaels...Helisell, Ewen, and a couple others are light years ahead of most sales trainers I know.

      How they all ended up on this forum, at the same time....amazes me.

      Notice I didn't mention my name? It's because, like all great men...I'm humble.:rolleyes:

      Claude "Humble and makes sure everyone knows it!" Whitacre


      PS. (added later) I just wanted to say that Misterme's riff on women on a date and how they are "weeding out applicants" was eye opening and hilarious. Hilarious because I can't tell you how many times I spewed out enough stupidity to insure a ride home alone. Brilliant.
      Signature
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      "Be kind. For everyone you meet is fighting a hard battle".....Ian Maclaren
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      • Profile picture of the author ewenmack
        Gawd, it's threads like this that just have me soaking up the depth and width of wisdom here.

        Just freaking brilliant guys!

        I mostly stay out of these so the free-flow can keep rollin' on.

        It would be my luck to step in and kill it.

        But rest assured, I do soak it up and luv every second of it.

        Everybody, give yourself a pat on your back...from me.

        Carry on fellas!

        Best,
        Ewen
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  • Profile picture of the author bob ross
    It's so interesting to hear all of our different approaches.

    Since we're talking about husband/wife stuff, here's a technique I've used with a lot of success when closing on payments. This is a REALLY REALLY good method and it's made me a ton of money and closed countless deals over and over:

    Let's say the payment can be as low as $175 and the "think about it" objection comes up. They're 'not sure if it's affordable' or whatever, telling you that they need a few days to see if it's something they can swing in the monthly budget.

    Now this objection could certainly be nonsense, but it doesn't matter because we can actually use it to not only weed out the real objection but close them as well.

    In reality, if the budget is tight, they might not actually be able to determine if they can afford $175 each month when they're on-the-spot like that. And we certainly don't want to pack up and leave so they can have a few days to crunch numbers (AKA never think of you again!).

    So we help them by breaking it down into weekly amounts. (A lot of you will be familiar with this technique so far but my twist is coming.)

    So, if they're not sure $175 is easily affordable, you can break it down into weeks and say something like "is only around $45 per week". Now it's much easier for them to analyze and determine whether it's affordable because the time period is shorter.

    But still, it can be a tough call for them. Now most of you familiar with this method might keep breaking it apart into daily figures like "only around $5 per day" but here's my twist instead of doing that:

    I break the payment down into weekly amounts, then split that figure right in half to be relevant between both of their paychecks. This is assuming they both work of course. So it would say this:

    "Jim, I certainly know how it is trying to figure out if something fits in the monthly budget, it's tough when it's tight! But let me ask you guys a question since both of you really would like to get this moving forward..."

    "Mary out of your paycheck could you swing twenty bucks?" and "Jim, could you swing $20 out of your check?"


    A few things happen:

    1. Now you've made it super simple to figure out if it fits in the budget or not because monthly budgets are complex but weekly budgets are easy when they're simply reduced to a set amount each check, per person. It's not about $175 anymore, it's about a measly $20 each of them out of their paycheck. (note: you can always use the word "around" to shave off or add on few dollars)

    2. In almost all cases, one will actually say that they'll cover the cost themselves and in almost all cases, the other will then respond with "no, I'll pay it all" and it will turn into a battle of who is going to step up to the plate and help the other out. It's hilarious to watch the dynamics play out.

    3. If they still aren't sure, you've killed the objection because it would silly to still 'have to think' about the affordability when you've reduced it down to an amount per paycheck per spouse.

    If they're not sure that broken-down amount is affordable, all you have to do is get the figure out of them that they can both easily pitch in per week towards your product/service. If say they can each afford ten bucks per week, that's an $80 payment figured out, so now you can close on something for $80.

    cliffs:

    - husband & wife say they need to think about it because they need time to see it fits in their budget.
    - you break down the payment into weekly amounts
    - you break the weekly amount in half and ask if they could each afford that out of their check (reducing the original payment by 1/8th!)
    - watch them dicker between each other using reverse psychology as they each say they'll pay for the whole thing themselves, which closes the deal for you.
    - if they still can't say yes, you just have to ask them what they each easily afford per week out of their check, and multiplying those amounts by four to find what payment it will take to close them! If he can do $25 and she can do $10, you can get that payment to $155 easily.

    bazinga!
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    • Profile picture of the author Claude Whitacre
      Originally Posted by bob ross View Post


      So, if they're not sure $175 is easily affordable, you can break it down into weeks and say something like "is only around $45 per week". Now it's much easier for them to analyze and determine whether it's affordable because the time period is shorter.

      But still, it can be a tough call for them. Now most of you familiar with this method might keep breaking it apart into daily figures like "only around $5 per day" but here's my twist instead of doing that:

      I break the payment down into weekly amounts, then split that figure right in half to be relevant between both of their paychecks. This is assuming they both work of course. So it would say this:

      "Jim, I certainly know how it is trying to figure out if something fits in the monthly budget, it's tough when it's tight! But let me ask you guys a question since both of you really would like to get this moving forward..."

      "Mary out of your paycheck could you swing twenty bucks?" and "Jim, could you swing $20 out of your check?"
      Brilliant...as expected.

      The "split the weekly payment between them" idea is actually one I never heard before, and it sounds sooo cool.

      Added after the next post by Ewen.
      Originally Posted by ewenmack View Post

      Years ago when I was in the Lawn Mowing game,
      I would present the price as...

      "Other people are paying me number of dollars for your size lawn."
      Ewen; I can immediately see several uses for this idea; "Other clients are paying me $699 a month for this service". "Many of my customers tell me they are used to paying $600-$800 for a good vacuum cleaner". Good stuff.
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      • Profile picture of the author ewenmack
        Years ago when I was in the Lawn Mowing game,
        I would present the price as...

        "Other people are paying me $x number of dollars for your size lawn."

        Then shut up.

        Many times it seemed the silence was a looong time.

        They had to be the first one to talk.

        I wasn't going to rescue them.

        What it did was show that it was ok for others,
        then by implication it should be ok for them.

        Since most people are followers, not leaders,
        this gave them assurance.

        I felt the silence part was a way of showing my comfort around price
        and not coming off as needy, which draws people away.

        This presentation of price had been forgotten by me until
        this week when a client asked me how to present price.

        And bingo, my old brain came to the party!

        Best,
        Ewen
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