Want A Great Job Tomorrow? Here's How. Really.

24 replies
I see that some warriors are looking for jobs. I understand.

The following method will work. I've done it myself, and would hire anyone that used it with me. You will be the only person the company is looking to hire, if you follow this idea. Ready?

About 30 years ago, I decided to open a retail store. I wanted to learn how to do that from someone respected in the business I chose. So I asked several people (in the retail vacuum cleaner business) who they thought could teach me. They all said one thing "Whatever you do, don't go see Julius Toth. That guy is evil"

So now...I had to meet him.

I walked into his store, asked to talk to him, and told him that I wanted to work for him. He said "I have 5 guys working the floor. I have no openings. Sorry"

And here is what I said;
"I want to open a store like yours. You are the guy I want to learn from.
I'll make you a deal..pay me whatever you want..straight commission, small salary, nothing...I don't care. I'm here to learn from you.

I'll work with you for 6 months however you want to do it. I won't take any sales away from your employees. I'll make you money. I just want to learn how to do what you do"


He sat back in his chair for a minute. I knew I would get what I came for. He had nothing to lose and everything to gain.

He said "Ok. I'll pay you a commission on what you sell. And I'll teach you everything you need to know. Just agree that you will open a store at least 25 miles away". "Done" I said.

He ended up giving me a very generous pay. In the early 1980's I was averaging between $800-$1,200 a week. It took me a week or so to figure out how I was going to make sales without taking sales away from his other guys..but it worked out fine. I worked about 4 hours a day, and learned everything I needed to know to start my own store. He even gave me starting inventory on consignment. We became fast friends even till today.

So...I know what you are thinking "I don't want to work on commission" "I don't want a retail store" "I don't want to sell anything" None of that matters.

Here's what matters; I said I wanted to learn his business, and I wanted to learn from him. I didn't care what I was paid, because I was learning while I worked with him. I wouldn't cost any money, because I'd make sure he made money on me. (You can say that even in a salaried office position).

And why does this work? Because employers never hear it.

At my store, I get, about every few days...someone poking their head in the door "Are you guys hiring?" "Are you guys taking applications?"

The answer is always a swift "No".

But....
If someone would walk in and say "I want to learn this business, and I've been asking several other retailers, and they say you're the guy to learn from. Pay me whatever you want. I just want to learn from you and make you money."

...I would hire them in a heartbeat.. I may even adopt them.

Why? Because now it's about me, and what he can do for me...not about what I can do for him. And nobody...nobody ever says what I just said.

If you were one of a thousand applicants...you would get the job. You would be so unique. And you would be unique in a way that is attractive to an employer.

I know this would work with small businesses. Large companies with HR departments? You need to talk to the person that owns the business, or the CEO.

Go get em.
#great #job #tomorrow
  • Profile picture of the author Rearden
    Claude, I wish I had this sort of encouragement growing up!

    And it's especially more powerful and unique in our entitlement-minded culture we have in America.
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    • Profile picture of the author JacobS
      I wish somebody had told me this when I was a kid!
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  • Profile picture of the author SashaLee
    Originally Posted by Claude Whitacre View Post


    So...I know what you are thinking "I don't want to work on commission" "I don't want a retail store" "I don't want to sell anything" None of that matters.
    Hi there,

    This is the phrase that defines the useless among us. It can be loosely translated to:

    "I don't want to work" "I don't want to work" "I want someone to give me money"

    In which case take advantage of the dole. Only the government will give you money for doing nothing,

    This is awesome advice from Claude. I'd be surprised if 1 in a million took it, and I'd like to hire that 1 person.

    All the best,

    Sasha.
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    • Profile picture of the author Bruce NewMedia
      Originally Posted by SashaLee View Post

      Hi there,

      This is the phrase that defines the useless among us. It can be loosely translated to:

      "I don't want to work" "I don't want to work" "I want someone to give me money"
      Claude's advice is right on, and I got one of my early sales jobs doing something similar. It's always a tempting offer for an owner who's hungry for more business.

      I want add something related to SashaLee's post.

      Years ago I'm running a small business that recruited stylists and nail techs for beauty salons. I could only call on so many salons a day, and knew any decent sales guy or gal could make a nice living doing exactly what I was doing.

      One day, I'm coming out of a salon and a fellow yells to me, "Excuse me, but you don;t know anyone who's hiring around here?" I guess I looked like a business-type.

      I said, "I do, I'm going to grab a bite in the deli, c'mon with me"..
      So we discussed his situation, which was basically that he was broke. Owed child support and felt terrible that he couldn't provide.

      I started describing the sales job, and he seemed interested, BUT there was a problem. He needed certain things: A salary, health insurance, and a car allowance (gas)...I forget what else, but it really surprised me.

      He actually said he would not work on commission and be uncertain what he would earn. I would have personally invested my time to train him and if he would just have made the calls, he'd have written business. But, it wasn't good enough for him.

      Society has taught people to think in terms of guarantees and their expectations are keeping many from making money. Putting yourself out there like Claude points out,
      really separates you from the crowd. It's good advice - thanks Claude!
      _____
      Bruce
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      • Profile picture of the author Claude Whitacre
        Originally Posted by Bruce NewMedia View Post

        He actually said he would not work on commission and be uncertain what he would earn. I would have personally invested my time to train him and if he would just have made the calls, he'd have written business. But, it wasn't good enough for him.

        Society has taught people to think in terms of guarantees and their expectations are keeping many from making money. Putting yourself out there like Claude points out,
        really separates you from the crowd. It's good advice - thanks Claude!
        _____
        Bruce
        It doesn't surprise me at all. The vast majority of people I meet think that a commission is something you settle for when you can't get a real job.

        That's so sad. In every sales position I've ever held, I made more in commission that anyone in the company on a salary. In fact, in my forst sales job selling life insurance, they gave me the great news that I would keep my training salary for another three months, because of a mistake in the date I was hired. But my salary was $150 a week (in 1976) and I was earning over $1,000 a week in commissions. It was the first time ever in that agency where the commission (out of the gate) was more than the training salary.

        But I'm not bragging, anyone with a pulse could have been the top guy in that agency.


        Do you know who gets paid in commission? Business owners. Business partners. Employers. Commission is something to strive for, not avoid.


        Originally Posted by dollarswealth View Post

        Wao. But do you think this approach could work in dubai, i frequently go to dubai and spend 2months there
        Dubai? Well, I've done enormous amounts of research as to whether this would work in Dubai.

        I'm joking...I have no idea. I suspect it would work far better than saying "Do you have a job opening?" or "Are you hiring?" (Possibly the most worthless question I can hear from a human being)
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  • Profile picture of the author DaniMc
    I actually learned to talk to business owners like this after I was broke in my 20's.

    People sit around, looking at Monster or Indeed, tweaking their resume, sending emails, filling out forms...what a waste of time.

    If you are looking for a job, don't stand in the "job line" like every other person without work. Just a big herd of hopelessness.

    Instead, figure out what job you want to do, then make a list of every single place you could do that type of work.

    Dress nice and walk in - ask for the top dog (manager, owner, whatever - depends on the size of the company).

    Look them right in the eye and say "You should hire me. I will be the hardest working employee you have ever had. It would be your finest decision to bring me into this company. I will make you money (or save time, or work more hours) than anyone else. Your boss will think you are brilliant if you give me the chance. 60 days from now, if I don't live up to it, fire me."

    I guarantee - anyone who says that to 10 people per day, will have the job they want at the pay they want.

    I would give my left arm for someone to say those words to me. It just doesn't happen.
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    • Profile picture of the author Jason Kanigan
      Originally Posted by Dan McCoy View Post

      I actually learned to talk to business owners like this after I was broke in my 20's.

      People sit around, looking at Monster or Indeed, tweaking their resume, sending emails, filling out forms...what a waste of time.

      If you are looking for a job, don't stand in the "job line" like every other person without work. Just a big herd of hopelessness.

      Instead, figure out what job you want to do, then make a list of every single place you could do that type of work.

      Dress nice and walk in - ask for the top dog (manager, owner, whatever - depends on the size of the company).

      Look them right in the eye and say "You should hire me. I will be the hardest working employee you have ever had. It would be your finest decision to bring me into this company. I will make you money (or save time, or work more hours) than anyone else. Your boss will think you are brilliant if you give me the chance. 60 days from now, if I don't live up to it, fire me."

      I guarantee - anyone who says that to 10 people per day, will have the job they want at the pay they want.

      I would give my left arm for someone to say those words to me. It just doesn't happen.
      Absolutely. Submitting applications through Monster and CareerBuilder is a waste of time. I know. When I got to the US and was finally allowed to work, I sent probably 1000 applications and got zero responses.

      Linkedin Jobs was effective. Emailing decision makers was effective. Talking to them by phone was very effective.

      For Monster & CB, much of the time they already have someone in mind...but government requirements force them to get so many candidates together to SAY they have interviewed and reviewed people. What a waste of time. You don't even have a chance. They just have to have these applications on file in case the gov't comes looking.

      Get a blog up...do some videos...get some content out there to show yourself off as a UNIQUE individual. You can point people to this content. It's worked for me.
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      • Profile picture of the author ronr
        Jason interesting you said Linkedin is good for finding jobs.

        Are you talking about try to find unadvertised jobs by networking, going directly to owner, etc?

        A family member was trying to use Likedin to find a job and when they entered a search for their field they found lots of jobs but also found that dozens of people applied for each one. Some over a hundred.

        Ron

        Originally Posted by Jason Kanigan View Post

        Absolutely. Submitting applications through Monster and CareerBuilder is a waste of time. I know. When I got to the US and was finally allowed to work, I sent probably 1000 applications and got zero responses.

        Linkedin Jobs was effective. Emailing decision makers was effective. Talking to them by phone was very effective.

        For Monster & CB, much of the time they already have someone in mind...but government requirements force them to get so many candidates together to SAY they have interviewed and reviewed people. What a waste of time. You don't even have a chance. They just have to have these applications on file in case the gov't comes looking.

        Get a blog up...do some videos...get some content out there to show yourself off as a UNIQUE individual. You can point people to this content. It's worked for me.
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        • Profile picture of the author Jason Kanigan
          Originally Posted by ronr View Post

          Jason interesting you said Linkedin is good for finding jobs.

          Are you talking about try to find unadvertised jobs by networking, going directly to owner, etc?

          A family member was trying to use Likedin to find a job and when they entered a search for their field they found lots of jobs but also found that dozens of people applied for each one. Some over a hundred.

          Ron
          So sort some more. These people are ACTUALLY hiring, unlike the Careerbuilder/Monster listings. These applications are probably even being looked at by someone with hiring authority!

          Don't apply to recruiter-posted jobs, if you want to increase your chances. I would always rather apply to 10 laser-focused roles that I am actually qualified for than 100 "maybe I'm sort of a fit" positions. But people do the opposite. And exhaust themselves. My last job hunt in Vancouver, I applied to four positions. Four. And I got two offers from them in a very short time. It's not 'cause I'm so great: it's because I'm focused.

          As far as 100 people appyling, it's much easier to stand out in a field of 100 than 1,000.

          Send me your family member's resume so I can review it, if they are still hunting. Very few people have their resume set up correctly.
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          • Profile picture of the author Aaron Doud
            Originally Posted by Jason Kanigan View Post

            Don't apply to recruiter-posted jobs, if you want to increase your chances. I would always rather apply to 10 laser-focused roles that I am actually qualified for than 100 "maybe I'm sort of a fit" positions. But people do the opposite. And exhaust themselves. My last job hunt in Vancouver, I applied to four positions. Four. And I got two offers from them in a very short time. It's not 'cause I'm so great: it's because I'm focused.
            I was always that way myself. My current job was the only one I applied for. It was the only one that fit what I was looking for. And once I got the first phone interview I made sure to sell myself the whole process. I knew I wanted the job so I made sure I sold them on why I should get the job.

            My job before this was the only job I applied for as well. I wasn't even looking but someone told me to apply and I did. During the interview they convinced me it was the right job and I convinced them I was the right candidate. Longest interview of my life. It was 2.5 hours long. The followup interview (with the VP) was nearly 2 hours as well and they made the offer at the end of that interview.

            The one before that was one of like 6. Only got interviews for 2 as I was trying to apply for a job above what I had. The one that hired me saw potential and interviewed me for a more lateral position but with better pay and advancement opportunities. The other company I got down to the final 10 but didn't have the experience needed to get past that. Also looking back I was not the right fit for the company and should not have applied.
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  • Profile picture of the author Talltom1
    Originally Posted by Claude Whitacre View Post

    ...I would hire them in a heartbeat.. I may even adopt them.
    Hey Claude, about this adopting business.....so would Thanksgiving dinner be at your house this year??


    My contribution to this thread, (seriously - I'm contributing something here), is to say that none of us ever hears that type of talk, because nobody has ever taught them to say that type of talk; that this is how you sell yourself. Schools are not teaching people any street smarts like that, only book knowledge. So when somebody shows up at your door, the only thing they can sell is what they know, not what they can do for you. And then our culture has shifted to the extent that now its only all about the 'me' generation.
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  • Profile picture of the author Arzak
    Great advice that you can apply to cover letters/resumes too. Applicants are typically too interested in talking about themselves, and completely forget about the employer and how they can benefit from hiring them.
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  • Profile picture of the author MobiGorilla
    Claude, great post!
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  • Profile picture of the author Jason Kanigan
    Anyone interested in looking for a job, PM me and I'll help you with the project. I've helped many people over the past 20 years find work they enjoy. Tell me what kind of role you're looking for so I can best advise you.
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  • Profile picture of the author dollarswealth
    Wao. But do you think this approach could work in dubai, i frequently go to dubai and spend 2months there
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  • Profile picture of the author Charles Harper
    Great discussion.

    Dr. Thomas Stanley suggests in "Networking With Millionaires" to interview decision makers on the most serious problem facing the industry where you want to work. Then giving all of those decision makers a copy of the report and your findings. That would be perfect for the approach that Mr. Kanigan is talking about.

    CT
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    • Profile picture of the author shane_k
      Originally Posted by SashaLee View Post

      Hi there,

      "I don't want to work" "I don't want to work" "I want someone to give me money"
      this is so true, lol

      I volunteer my time at a friends job hunting clinic where he teaches people how to find jobs.

      and I go in and teach people what to say and ask when either making calls or walking in to a business.

      And some of the calls I have heard people make just made me cringe, because it was all about them. A lot of them wouldn't even ask anything about the company they were applying to, all they would do is talk about how much they were paid in their last job, and what were they going to be paid in this job, and how much vacation time, and after they were rejected they would wonder why they didn't get an interview, lol.

      They just came across like you said, "I don't want to work, but I do want someone to give money."


      Originally Posted by Dan McCoy View Post

      I actually learned to talk to business owners like this after I was broke in my 20's.

      People sit around, looking at Monster or Indeed, tweaking their resume, sending emails, filling out forms...what a waste of time.
      At my friends job hunting clinic we teach people that applying online through Monster and Indeed, and other similar sites actually has only a 4% success rate.

      Compare that to either calling up a business to get an interview or walking into a business to get an interview both of which have an average of a 69% success rate.



      If you are looking for a job, don't stand in the "job line" like every other person without work. Just a big herd of hopelessness.

      Instead, figure out what job you want to do, then make a list of every single place you could do that type of work.

      Dress nice and walk in - ask for the top dog (manager, owner, whatever - depends on the size of the company).
      Another one of the things that we teach them are that most jobs are filled before any job advertisements are posted.

      And that waiting until a job is posted is the worst thing to do because then you are going to be competing with the crowd.

      But if you do what you are suggesting and drop in to a business, you can possibly catch some companies in the position where they know they need someone but they haven't actually posted the job yet.


      Originally Posted by dollarswealth View Post

      Wao. But do you think this approach could work in dubai, i frequently go to dubai and spend 2months there

      Sure, but you don't necessarily have to say what Claude is mentioning.

      Instead you can use the mindset behind the words and that is instead of just focusing on your own needs and what you want from the company that you are applying to, you want to research the company and find out what they want in an employee.

      And that works anywhere in the world, because no matter which country you live in, every employee wants something. It's up to you to find out what. And you can do that either through research or through asking questions
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  • Profile picture of the author rizy
    I have actually said something exactly like Claude suggested to get a Verizon job, and I really was and still am interested in opening one. But it didn't work.

    I have said something like Dan McCoy (without the part of I can make you money) almost in every interview but this also didn't work for me.

    Until last year the same time, my whole life I had trouble getting a job.

    I always dressed up nice, always had an awesome resume with design, always knew how to talk and give great answers to interviews or at least I always walked out of an interview feeling great. But I don't know if it is the East SoCal or what, but I never got a call back. So I had to work through temporary agencies and worked at Warehouses, Delivering Pizza, Pushing Carts, and I finally stumbled upon a great Restaurant Job, I probably visited 30 restaurants and one restaurant finally hired me, I made 400 in 4 days but felt so bad, and left, I never thought I could do something so silly like that trying 2 months to get a job only to leave in 4 days but I had to leave.

    At that point I decided that I am not going to go where they are hiring or where I can make money, I am going to do something I like, and I really liked cell phones, so I decided to visit 10 stores in 10 days. I didn't had to I visited 3 and after the weekend was over all of them called back for an interview. And I got a job...

    The point is do what you really like, because when you do that you know what to say, you know what they want to hear.

    Tip: to get a cell phone job talk to regional director, don't bother talking to manager. This industry always needs people.
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    • Profile picture of the author Jason Kanigan
      Originally Posted by rizy View Post

      I have actually said something exactly like Claude suggested to get a Verizon job, and I really was and still am interested in opening one. But it didn't work.

      I have said something like Dan McCoy (without the part of I can make you money) almost in every interview but this also didn't work for me.

      Until last year the same time, my whole life I had trouble getting a job.

      I always dressed up nice, always had an awesome resume with design, always knew how to talk and give great answers to interviews or at least I always walked out of an interview feeling great. But I don't know if it is the East SoCal or what, but I never got a call back. So I had to work through temporary agencies and worked at Warehouses, Delivering Pizza, Pushing Carts, and I finally stumbled upon a great Restaurant Job, I probably visited 30 restaurants and one restaurant finally hired me, I made 400 in 4 days but felt so bad, and left, I never thought I could do something so silly like that trying 2 months to get a job only to leave in 4 days but I had to leave.

      At that point I decided that I am not going to go where they are hiring or where I can make money, I am going to do something I like, and I really liked cell phones, so I decided to visit 10 stores in 10 days. I didn't had to I visited 3 and after the weekend was over all of them called back for an interview. And I got a job...

      The point is do what you really like, because when you do that you know what to say, you know what they want to hear.

      Tip: to get a cell phone job talk to regional director, don't bother talking to manager. This industry always needs people.
      You are always going to have a more difficult time getting the response you want from big corporate places rather than smaller individual-owner stores. The corporate people have processes, procedures and have to cover their behinds. The individual owners can do whatever they want, immediately. So the "walk in and talk" option typically has better chances of succeeding in a non-corporate setting.

      Personally I've had businesses create roles for me three times that didn't exist until I walked in the door. Two were management roles. All three were with non-chain firms where I could get right to the decision maker.

      I agree with the idea of going up the chain to the Regional Manager at a company like a cell phone sales company. They will see you as an individual rather than front-line cannon fodder; far fewer people will be talking to them since they will be too scared to; they can make a decision from "on high" more easily; they are less concerned about budget than the store manager; and whatever the RM says goes.
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  • Profile picture of the author PanteraIM
    Awesome, awesome, awesome!

    Great advice, Claude.

    Incidentally, this is how I got my first ever TM job, offering to cold call for insurance brokers on straight commission and being paid per appt.

    I believe this is what they mean when they say to 'create the opportunity'!

    There's always room for a hungry commission-based salesperson, always!

    Thanks for posting.
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  • Profile picture of the author bizgrower
    Awesome post Claude. The country needs more of this fearless mentality and attitude towards commission or self-employment.

    I know too many people who work bad jobs when they are capable of either a better job,
    or starting their own business.

    There is a planning and saving money element to it also, but mainly a better attitude is what is needed.

    On a side note about attitude, I once interviewed for a sales position and the manager said a good salesperson should be able to sell anything. I did not like him or his business, so I took it the wrong way - as in thinking ethics and believing in what you sell should apply. (Which I think they should, but looking back I don't think he was promoting a lack of ethics or passion.)

    See, years later I got talking to a business owner who had previously sold for IBM. And while sitting at the bar, he effectively "sold" me a straw by describing the straw and it's functions...
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  • Profile picture of the author Jeremy James
    Jason, just PM'd you.
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  • I've been in hiring positions in sales for several businesses for the last 20 years. I can count on one hand the times someone even expressed confidence that they could be successful at the job they were applying for. If more people took this approach it would drastically change and improve the hiring process.
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