47 replies
This subject came up in another thread.

This is for those selling internet marketing services to restaurants and cafes.

I have quite a few of these as clients.

And what's interesting is I get to see the turnover of
my clients businesses through the volume of printed receipts,
since I supply them the paper.

Here's a few examples...

One long established and what I see has a good reputation
has a website hooked into social...
yet the owner tells me it's tough going.

I have another 2 that have opened other outlets
and have no websites.

A Sushi owner has opened up 2 other outlets for family members to run them.
No website

A big Chinese restaurant opened up another outlet for family to run it.
No website

A group of Indian restaurants [my clients] have taken over
my clients business which is European food and keeping it the same.
Has website

A Malasion one is in a Asian foodcourt and the place is packed.
No website.

A NZ guy who owns 2 Thai restaurants are packed.
One location has people waiting in line out to the street.
Hi biggest problem is meeting demand.
No website.

Those are a few of my clients off the top of my head.

There are some very smart operators out there
that are doing very well without websites.

Best,
Ewen
  • Profile picture of the author JacobS
    I think this depends on how integral delivery is to your business model. With Dine-In/Take-Out, you probably don't need a website or even a facebook page. If you depend on delivery as a significant portion of your revenue and you don't have a web presence, you're a fool.

    Also, speaking only for my geographic area, being "hooked into social" isn't as important as being listed on grubhub.
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    • Profile picture of the author ewenmack
      Originally Posted by JGSimmerman View Post

      I think this depends on how integral delivery is to your business model. With Dine-In/Take-Out, you probably don't need a website or even a facebook page. If you depend on delivery as a significant portion of your revenue and you don't have a web presence, you're a fool.

      Also, speaking only for my geographic area, being "hooked into social" isn't as important as being listed on grubhub.
      The Thai restaurant I mentioned has take out and owners biggest concern
      is meeting demand, has no website.

      Calling him a fool is laughable!

      That's why I bring this subject up,
      some of you guys into selling internet
      services, telling what are thriving businesses,
      how they should run them is crazy stuff.

      Best,
      Ewen
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      • Profile picture of the author Ron Lafuddy
        If the only tool you have is a hammer, you tend to treat everything as if it were a nail.
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        • Profile picture of the author hardyfella
          Ewen have these businesses grown using any kind of marketing other than word of mouth and a great product?
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          • Profile picture of the author ewenmack
            Originally Posted by hardyfella View Post

            Ewen have these businesses grown using any kind of marketing other than word of mouth and a great product?
            I don't know what they have done in the way of marketing.

            Best,
            Ewen
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  • Profile picture of the author socialentry
    Yes absolutly,

    Logic is the first tumbler.
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    • Profile picture of the author liquide43
      Originally Posted by socialentry View Post

      Yes absolutly,

      Logic is the first tumbler.
      good talking, logic is everthink.
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  • Profile picture of the author internetmonkey
    Great reminder. I admittedly find myself in the mindset of every businesses owner should want/need a great looking modern website with mobile features.

    Reminds me of the classic story of 2 people carrying suitcases walking down the street.
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  • Profile picture of the author abelamorales
    Another interesting post, Ewen!

    Instead of selling a website or SEO, we need to sell solutions.

    How would you help a business that is already thriving?
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    • Profile picture of the author ewenmack
      Originally Posted by abelamorales View Post

      Another interesting post, Ewen!

      Instead of selling a website or SEO, we need to sell solutions.

      How would you help a business that is already thriving?
      Abel, ask yourself those questions...this will train you
      to see opportunity and see things from your
      prospects point of view.

      You are welcome to post your answers here though.

      Best,
      Ewen
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    • Profile picture of the author Sherese
      yup i agree with you..a website is a communication tool that can have marketing or sales function and if a restaurant owner has a business growth objective-- like he wants the presence of restaurants reputation to be in the minds of people in an local area outside of his immediate area then a website may be integral part of overall marketing solution..like you said it depends on the objective and the problem to solve in term of customer communication...with website
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  • Profile picture of the author Arzak
    There are always some popular local restaurants that just don't need any kind of marketing. There's one Vietnamese-Cambodian restaurant here that's always packed and has long lineups pretty much all day, everyday.

    Their online presence?

    Hundreds of reviews and blog posts about them.
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    • Profile picture of the author ewenmack
      I called into a client's Kebab place today
      and it reminded me he has recently opened up a
      cafe.

      The Kebab place has no website
      but his new cafe does.

      The cafe is quieter than the Kebab place
      whenever I go past the 2.

      Best,
      Ewen
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      • Profile picture of the author SashaLee
        Originally Posted by ewenmack View Post

        I called into a client's Kebab place today
        and it reminded me he has recently opened up a
        cafe.

        The Kebab place has no website
        But his new cafe doesn't.

        The cafe is quoted than the Kebab place
        whenever I go past the 2.

        Best,
        Ewen
        Uh...what? I think your Dragon Naturally Speaking is not catching up with your speaking.....

        Or like me, you've blown the froth off a couple...

        All the best,

        Sasha.
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        • Profile picture of the author ewenmack
          Originally Posted by SashaLee View Post

          Uh...what? I think your Dragon Naturally Speaking is not catching up with your speaking.....

          Or like me, you've blown the froth off a couple...

          All the best,

          Sasha.
          Darn iPhone puts words into my fingers!

          Corrected.

          Best,
          Ewen
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      • Profile picture of the author sbucciarel
        Banned
        Originally Posted by ewenmack View Post

        I called into a client's Kebab place today
        and it reminded me he has recently opened up a
        cafe.

        The Kebab place has no website
        but his new cafe does.

        The cafe is quieter than the Kebab place
        whenever I go past the 2.

        Best,
        Ewen
        I never look for a place to eat on the Internet. Sometimes I drive around with whoever is going to eat with me and just drop into whatever looks interesting. Some are advertised on TV. Some send coupons. Some I visit due to word of mouth. Some I visit because I know they're brand new and want to check them out.

        That goes for most of the local businesses that I shop at. The Internet does not factor in at all.

        I might look up restaurants if I were traveling out of state and wanted to see what was there.
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  • Profile picture of the author Jason Kanigan
    Yup, your prospects have been surviving this long without your help.

    Sort and find those who agree that they need your help BEFORE you try selling. Your job will be much easier and less stressful.
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  • Profile picture of the author trader909
    Banned
    have to admit i've never searched/booked a restaurant online in 5+ years
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  • Profile picture of the author trader909
    Banned
    Reminds me of the classic story of 2 people carrying suitcases walking down the street.
    please tell me.
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  • Profile picture of the author DABK
    True, they don't.

    All the same, in the last 6 months, 6 restaurants within close distance from where I live, went out of business. Two diners, a Hooters-like place (minus the buxomness) (great food, nice atmosphere, inside a shopping complex, across the street from a Panera and a Potbelly... Better than both, still, out of business.) A fish only restaurant... The others I never figured out what they were.

    Originally Posted by ewenmack View Post

    This subject came up in another thread.

    This is for those selling internet marketing services to restaurants and cafes.

    I have quite a few of these as clients.

    And what's interesting is I get to see the turnover of
    my clients businesses through the volume of printed receipts,
    since I supply them the paper.

    Here's a few examples...

    One long established and what I see has a good reputation
    has a website hooked into social...
    yet the owner tells me it's tough going.

    I have another 2 that have opened other outlets
    and have no websites.

    A Sushi owner has opened up 2 other outlets for family members to run them.
    No website

    A big Chinese restaurant opened up another outlet for family to run it.
    No website

    A group of Indian restaurants [my clients] have taken over
    my clients business which is European food and keeping it the same.
    Has website

    A Malasion one is in a Asian foodcourt and the place is packed.
    No website.

    A NZ guy who owns 2 Thai restaurants are packed.
    One location has people waiting in line out to the street.
    Hi biggest problem is meeting demand.
    No website.

    Those are a few of my clients off the top of my head.

    There are some very smart operators out there
    that are doing very well without websites.

    Best,
    Ewen
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  • Profile picture of the author mjbmedia
    I agree, but many restaurants are busy with low value clientele, and they'd rather be busy with high value clients.

    Low value = couple who drink tap water and only have one course.
    High value = groups of 4+ (family, friends, business) who all have pre dinner drinks, 3 course minimum, wine with main course, liquers and after dinner coffee.
    Signature

    Mike

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  • Profile picture of the author globalpro
    I have a friend/client that has a very busy restaurant. He didn't have a website, but has a very active Facebook page. I built him a website to tie into the review sites, but he really didn't need it. The FB page gets plenty of activity/engagement/updates which ranks in Google.

    He didn't really need the website.

    Another local cafe is using FB very effectively in generating business by posting breakfast/lunch/dinner specials, special events on weekends, etc. They are doing fine without a website.
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  • Profile picture of the author joecarson1
    Lets take a look at the business that has TOO much business. Whatever they are currently doing is working.

    So business owner says " I have too much business" my reply would be awesome. What are you doing to attract so many people? Service-product-location-new idea-etc. Now once I know what they are doing, maybe I can use the same techniques for other clients. So just talking to such businesses should be very valuable.

    What I could I offer such a business? Well, if they are not trying to gather customer contact info for future use they may be leaving money on the table. I wont get into the "how" part of the gathering the info [there are many ways] but the why could be nothing more than...

    "you will look to expand to another location one day, and when you do we could have a built in list of people ready to go for you. These people already love you and will be ready to tell everyone they know about your NEW location. We will make it very easy for them to spread the word, here's how [email, sms, social, etc]

    Even if that location is a year down the road, you can start building the lis today and be ready. As far as an offer from a too busy business to current customers, it can be just as simple as a birthday offer. Everyone has a birthday.
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  • Profile picture of the author kemdev
    No Ewen, this is for ALL businesses...

    I think the main misconception people have on here is that the services we offer (web dev, seo) are make-or-break for businesses. Or that they're going to make our clients hundreds of thousands of dollars each year. For your typical provider working with "local" clients, this just isn't the case.

    I offer solutions to pick up easy money that's left on the floor. This means building a website for a business that doesn't currently have one, or optimizing/re-designing a business's website that isn't performing.

    Either of those two options could easily result in 5 sales a year. But 50 sales? No way. At least if you're not in a major city with a lot of search volume.

    But people here want to act like the Internet is sooooooooo special. That successful businesses NEED what we have to offer. That they're just too stupid to see what we see. Well, I call bullshit.

    Nothing I can do for a client will surpass the marketing and referral systems they already have in place, if they're a successful business. And I build damn good websites that are damn well optimized. And guess what... they rank.

    So let's all be adults here and call this what it is:
    a way for businesses to pick up easy money being left on the floor. Not the million-dollar-fix to all a businesses problems.

    Maybe if people starting pitching the former benefit rather than the latter, they'd stop getting laughed out of meetings.


    Originally Posted by ewenmack View Post

    This subject came up in another thread.

    There are some very smart operators out there
    that are doing very well without websites.

    Best,
    Ewen
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    • Profile picture of the author Aaron Doud
      Originally Posted by kemdev View Post

      So let's all be adults here and call this what it is: a way for businesses to pick up easy money being left on the floor. Not the million-dollar-fix to all a businesses problems.

      Maybe if people starting pitching the former benefit rather than the latter, they'd stop getting laughed out of meetings.
      The funny thing is I highly suspect that those actually making money selling these services are doing just that. It's the people that make whatever they are selling out to be the next coming of Christ that puts me off personally. I simply won't buy from them because I don't trust them. And I suspect most business owners and managers think this way.

      Old school marketing is about over hype. New school is about honest hype.

      Old school selling was about forcing your will on the customer. New school selling is about building trust and helping them choose to buy from you.
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      • Profile picture of the author ewenmack
        Originally Posted by Aaron Doud View Post

        New school selling is about building trust and helping them choose to buy from you.
        That comment is very hard for marketers to grasp.

        The ads I now write have that helpful theme.

        If a person is about to buy,
        you want him not make a mistake.

        The buyer possibly doesn't know the traps.

        The buyer possibly doesn't know the implications of making the wrong decision.

        This aligns with the buying process of a buyer.

        We are working with it, not fighting against it.

        When read by a buyer, it feels as though it is valuable,
        even if he doesn't buy from you.

        Having expertise doesn't have the same value today as a person who can bridge the gap between expertise and showing how a buyer can make a good buying decision.

        Best,
        Ewen
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        • Profile picture of the author ewenmack
          Thanks Aaron for making the 3,000 "thank you's".

          That Claude fella is catching up very fast!

          Best,
          Ewen
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      • Profile picture of the author kemdev
        The proof is in the pudding, as they say. I suspect I'm one of the very few people here that make their living selling web development (ie. design, optimization, seo) services to local businesses. And I do pretty well.

        I think this 'idea' could easily be a thread of its own, and would be very beneficial to people who are still struggling to make sales. Here's my take on it...

        1) The 'IM' world is not the real world. We're not selling $27 eBooks to the masses. So seriously... forget the hype.

        2) Successful businesses (our target market) don't NEED the Internet to make sales. They have other marketing and referral systems in place that have gotten them to the point they are now. To look down on one of these businesses because (GASP) they don't have a website yet or (bigger GASP) they don't want to buy what you're selling isn't a reflection on them... it's a reflection on you.

        3) No matter how good you think you are (and lets face it... most of you have probably never made a dime online) the service you're offering isn't the end-all-be-all of business. They're not going to make 10K+ a month from your efforts and neither are you.

        3.1) I live in a smaller city, about 17K population. There's very little search volume for any keywords here. One of my top performing client websites is a used car dealer site that gets roughly 5-7 new leads per month. They paid me in total $2,500 for the site, optimization, and link building. They were in profit two months after hiring me. Most of my contractor sites get 1-5 leads per month. Their cost is $1,500, and they're generally profitable after month three.

        3.2) We're not selling a quick-fix solutions to all your business problems. We're not selling the idea of getting 10+ leads a week. We're not telling prospects, "Hey, you can get 5 leads a month out of this site. You're average bill is $3,000 right? That's $15,000 a month! Now pay me money..."

        No, no, no. We're selling a machine - a piece of online real estate that will likely send a handful of sales to our clients every year. Something they never touch, they never pay for month after month, something that's generally profitable after the first sale comes through.

        "Mr. Prospect, do you think it's unreasonable to expect 3 sales from this website in the first year?"

        ----- No, of course not. I'd like to get a lot more than that.

        "Of course you would, and I admit 3 is a small number. But I wanted to keep things on the conservative side and illustrate my point: this website won't make you rich, but it will send you leads every month that you wouldn't have gotten otherwise. And after that third sale, whether it's a month or a year from now, you'll have made double what you're going to pay me today."

        I make sales by being honest and realistic.



        Originally Posted by Aaron Doud View Post

        The funny thing is I highly suspect that those actually making money selling these services are doing just that. It's the people that make whatever they are selling out to be the next coming of Christ that puts me off personally. I simply won't buy from them because I don't trust them. And I suspect most business owners and managers think this way.

        Old school marketing is about over hype. New school is about honest hype.

        Old school selling was about forcing your will on the customer. New school selling is about building trust and helping them choose to buy from you.
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      • Profile picture of the author Mikaedi88
        Originally Posted by Aaron Doud View Post

        The funny thing is I highly suspect that those actually making money selling these services are doing just that. It's the people that make whatever they are selling out to be the next coming of Christ that puts me off personally. I simply won't buy from them because I don't trust them. And I suspect most business owners and managers think this way.

        Old school marketing is about over hype. New school is about honest hype.

        Old school selling was about forcing your will on the customer. New school selling is about building trust and helping them choose to buy from you.

        Well said Aaron, brings back memories of when I used to market and sell Security system to householders and businesses, there were many pushy salesman who would do all to make a sale, to the extent of preying on vulnerable elderly or disabled folk..
        Forcing our Government to change the law and the industry being forced to make changes on how they marketed their products..
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  • Profile picture of the author Mikaedi88
    Though not having an online presence for their business, that I suppose would depend a lot on location and advertising..

    Like Ewan I live in New Zealand, what I've seen is that especially with takeaway food outlets, in a great location, they don't really need a website, little advertising may well be enough, whether they be purely takeout or restaurant/takeout combined.

    With other businesses, having a good website is an absolute necessity.
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  • Profile picture of the author bizgrower
    Exactly. Provide the best solution for the particular business. A restaurant in a tourist or vacation area might need a website, or at least use of FB and TripAdvisor and travel guides...
    Signature

    "If you think you're the smartest person in the room, then you're probably in the wrong room."

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  • Profile picture of the author CageyVet
    I could care less how much business a company is doing....all I care about is helping that business Make More Money!....

    So if I talk to a restaurant owner that states his establishment is always full, then I try to help him make more money from the customers that fill his restaurant. If that means building a website, doing SEO, social media, PPC, offline flyers, videos, in-house promotional material, contents, etc....what ever it might be, as long as the strategy and method will make the company more money, then I will propose it to them. If it will not make them more money, then it is a waste of the business owners time and a complete waste of my time.

    It is as simple as that....

    All of these gurus, experts, SEO back link fools, web designers, social media experts, etc that state things like, "In Today's Age You NEED A Website To Survive", "With Out Facebook You Are Missing Out On Money", and "SEO Is The Second Coming Of Christ"....all they are doing it trying to make money for themselves, plain and simple.

    Not all things on the internet, off the internet or in marketing will increase a businesses ROI, improve profit margins, add cost saving or make someone more money...when it comes down to each individual business. If you think that every business, every restaurant, everyone needs a website, you are delusional. It is too bad that places like the WF and other similar locations on the net are filled with these delusional people that simply confuse businesses and individuals all the time.
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  • Profile picture of the author Chris Rivers
    Yes, I'm in the same boat as Suzanne.

    I never look online for a new restaurant. I only go online to get the number to pizza hut or little caesars because my phone isn't near.

    I may stop in to a restaurant if I'm driving by and it looks interesting AND is a type of food I love to eat. But, by this point, I have a steady routine of restaurants that I visit.

    And I was introduced to my current stable of restaurants by friends and family.

    Lastly, I completely agree that alot of offline marketers think that restaurants (and any business for that matter) needs them. They don't. They can succeed or fail on their own without our website, seo, mobile sites, emails etc.

    There were thousands of restaurants making millions of dollars before the internet, so it's definitely possible to succeed without it. I've also seen it first-hand.
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  • Profile picture of the author NewParadigm
    I do look online for restaurants and look at menus. Often times they aren't updated very well. I also look to see what live entertainment is playing, or happy hour specials.

    One approach to take with successful restaurants is taking the tack of how you might make their lives easier. Successful restaurateurs usually work their asses off. Quality of life might be a bigger appeal to them than getting a few more customers.

    BUT, I've been in thousands of restaurants after being in the food mfg biz in the past and I've never run into a single operator will ever really honestly say they have enough business. Rather, often times is an easy blow off to you for them not seeing value in your proposition at the time or they do not understand it, or it is new to them.

    I guarantee if you probe them it would be easy to identify opportunities to improve:

    build average checks(with promos of apps/drinks/desserts),
    drive traffic to slower dayparts (breakfast,lunch,dinner, late night),
    drive traffic to slower days(don't tell me you are slammed every single night and day).
    drive catering offsite(weddings, corporate lunches etc..)
    drive group business(parties, meetings)
    Successful operators will know these numbers, but won't tell you unless you ask and show a little interest.

    The other reason they may say they are too busy is if they are overworked since the biz generally requires long hands-on hours personally. Focus your pitch on how you can help them be more efficient and they'll be mentally ready to focus on more sales.
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    In a moment of decision the best thing you can do is the right thing. The worst thing you can do is nothing. ~ Theodore Roosevelt

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  • Profile picture of the author Seantrepreneur
    Great post! The barber I go to doesn't have a website, but what he does have is a an hour a half wait in his shop because he can't handle all the clients.

    Quality work is sometimes all the marketing you need!
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  • Profile picture of the author CageyVet
    That barber is obviously not charging enough for his services....
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    • Profile picture of the author DABK
      Most certainly, he is not.

      Originally Posted by CageyVet View Post

      That barber is obviously not charging enough for his services....
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    • Profile picture of the author mjbmedia
      Originally Posted by CageyVet View Post

      That barber is obviously not charging enough for his services....
      Surely that depends on the barbers aims and desires.

      He may be happy with the profits he makes and the lifestyle that gives him V higher paying different clientele that he doesn't enjoy engaging with on a regular basis . The barber spends a lot of hours chatting, listening and cutting hair, it's important that he enjoys that part of his life.

      Of course he could just run the shop and have others doing that for him but that part of it (cutting/engaging with clients) could be what's stopping him from having a stroke or getting dementia.

      Not everyone wants to be a millionaire.
      Signature

      Mike

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      • Profile picture of the author Ron Lafuddy
        Originally Posted by mjbmedia View Post

        Surely that depends on the barbers aims and desires.

        He may be happy with the profits he makes and the lifestyle that gives him V higher paying different clientele that he doesn't enjoy engaging with on a regular basis . The barber spends a lot of hours chatting, listening and cutting hair, it's important that he enjoys that part of his life.

        Of course he could just run the shop and have others doing that for him but that part of it (cutting/engaging with clients) could be what's stopping him from having a stroke or getting dementia.

        Not everyone wants to be a millionaire.
        mjbmedia,

        You nailed it! It's all about the business owner.

        That's really the point of this thread. What does the business owner
        think? What does he or she want or need from the business? What does
        "success" look like to them?

        Are they content and satisfied with the level of success that they are
        experiencing?

        What a business "needs" really begins...and ends, in the mind of the owner.
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    • Profile picture of the author sbucciarel
      Banned
      Originally Posted by CageyVet View Post

      That barber is obviously not charging enough for his services....
      Yeah, he should raise his prices so high that only the elite will visit. No more of those middle class and childs' haircuts. That should take care of the traffic/customer problem he has
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  • Profile picture of the author mjbmedia
    Ewen is right in what he says, they don't need a website to be where they are now in their business.

    But a website and other marketing strategies could take them beyond where they are now, help position them as a higher end establishment, attract as I said before those that are going to have a much higher average spend and higher frequency of spending, it could allow them to monetise areas of their business/ knowledge in other ways that wouldn't be restricted by time/ covers/ work stations etc .
    If these businesses are working with a REAL marketer , not just a service provider, then that REAL marketer will be looking well outside the box of normality
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    Mike

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  • Profile picture of the author NewParadigm
    A barber is a bit different than a restaurant in that he is trading his time for money. He can only cut one head at a time. If he is overbooked he can look at what type of customer is more profitable (ones that will pay higher prices and/or buy products). It's hard to scale yourself except hire employees or rent out other chairs in his shop to handle his lesser profitable clients.
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    • Profile picture of the author DABK
      Not if he's a business set up as a business. The barber I go to cuts hair, and has 4 others cutting hair in his establishment.

      I don't know how those other get paid, but I'm sure the owner barber gets something out of it because he's getting another barber to come in and he's going to do less cutting himself.

      Originally Posted by NewParadigm View Post

      A barber is a bit different than a restaurant in that he is trading his time for money. He can only cut one head at a time. If he is overbooked he can look at what type of customer is more profitable (ones that will pay higher prices and/or buy products). It's hard to scale yourself except hire employees or rent out other chairs in his shop to handle his lesser profitable clients.
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    • Profile picture of the author Aaron Doud
      Originally Posted by NewParadigm View Post

      A barber is a bit different than a restaurant in that he is trading his time for money. He can only cut one head at a time. If he is overbooked he can look at what type of customer is more profitable (ones that will pay higher prices and/or buy products). It's hard to scale yourself except hire employees or rent out other chairs in his shop to handle his lesser profitable clients.
      He could raise prices as well. That would slowly eliminate his least profitable customers. Any business where "you" are the business has to do this. It is the only way to grow.

      Any barber that is fully booked is charging too little. Also he could hire staff to do shampoo, handle phones, clean up, and prep clients. That way he could maximize profits even though only he is still doing the hair. By removing those smaller tasks he could free up time to get in more clients.

      You can be a one man show and grow. You simply have to value yourself vs. seeing being busy as value. Most don't do that. And since most businesses are really just jobs for the owner it is why they never make a good living.
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      • Profile picture of the author Claude Whitacre
        Yup. To me, there are three different types of businesses;

        They are already so busy ( from great service location, word of mouth) that any more business wouldn't really help. Good for them.

        They are dying in business, and need someone to save them. Yech.

        They are doing well, but want more.....
        These are the guys I want to talk to. Like Kemdev said, we aren't going to transform their business, but there are easy sales out there that most businesses want.

        I'm not in the restaurant niche. And I can't remember going online to find one.

        But my first thought is that there are times that the restaurant isn't busy...and that's when they could use more butts in seats. E-mails, coupons, text messages, are all smart ideas to fill that void.

        And it will happen. Long lines outside a restaurant don't last forever.

        If I had a long line outside my retail store...waiting to buy...you know what I would want more than anything in the world? A way to keep that line from going away. And I'd want a longer line.

        That's the kind of client you want.

        added later, after I inhaled again.
        By the way, before the recession, my retail store was doing phenomenally well without any online marketing, except a static boring website (which brought in nobody). Then half of my sales disappeared, but my overhead didn't. Online marketing helped. It wasn't a total cure...but it helped.

        Now, in a small town of 17,000 my online marketing, which is extensive, brings in between an extra $3,000 to $12,000 a month....in profit. Most of our sales are not from online sources...but I'm not going to flush this money down the toilet either.

        Oh, and I always lowball expectations for clients. A typical statement from me may be "Bob, every day, three people are going online to buy what you sell. How many of those three would you like to find you first?". See? You don't have to make up outrageous figures.
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  • Profile picture of the author NewParadigm
    Claude, you bring up a great point in motivating successful people. Ask them what kind of hit they have taken in a recent past recession. I guarantee almost every single one took a hit or had major worries. Probe how they felt and their future outlook at that point. Many people have short memories until prompted. Fear of loss is a huge motivator for currently busy/successful people to bank a little extra for those future downturns.

    Also, it's important to learn the difference between busy people and successful people. They are not the same.
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