Restaurant with no birthday club, no catering and no delivery. Do they like money?...

3 replies
Hey Offliners,

I'm going to throw a monkey wrench at you today.

But, it will be worth it.

See, I know that reputation management and mobile marketing is the hottest thing in offline marketing these days, but there is soooooo much more to getting diners to come through the door.

Don't get me wrong.

Reputation management is vitally important to a restaurant, but if a restaurant owner needed sales by this weekend, would he be clamoring to hire you to improve his online reputation?

Probably not.

However, if his reviews are in the toilet he definitely should be hiring you at some point, but just not for the weekend sales push.

Anyway, I've always had a few concerns about offering reputation management in my offline business.

For starters, what if their terrible reputation is earned and deserved? What do I do then?

Put lipstick on a pig and pucker up?

I think not.

Of course I realize that most restaurants are run by good people trying to provide good food and good service, but the guy who has twenty or thirty bad reviews definitely has some issues.

Now, when it comes to sms/mobile marketing, that has the potential to be a real gamechanger for most restaurants.

However, are the marketing messages mostly discount driven?

If so, that's a dangerous way for a restaurant owner to train his most loyal customers to take action and it can be the worst possible way to introduce people to the restaurant, unless a upsell funnel is in place.

That's what makes Groupon so dangerous for most businesses.

Just think about it for a moment.

Would you only want your best clients to consistently hire you because you're running a sale and bleeding profits left and right.

Of course not.

In reality, you want clients to hire you at premium prices in exchange for providing premium value and services to them.

Sure you can run a sale from time to time, but it certainly shouldn't be something you do every single day all day long.

That's business suicide.

I've personally learned that lesson the hard way.

So, what's the answer to the question of what should you be trying to do for a restaurant to bring in more guests and diners.

Well, the real money-makers are birthday party's and events related to birthdays, catering and delivery.

That's where most of the independent restaurant owner's make a killing.

They can add all types of valuable incentives and higher priced items when they are offering those specialty services.

So, the real question is, are you going to be the marketing consultant to help them get those programs up and running.

Or do they have to hire a expensive marketing consultant like me to do that while you're just running a back-linking campaign to push the good reviews above the bad ones for a few hundred dollars?

I know which one I'd rather be, but that doesn't really matter.

What really matters is which one would you rather be?

Now, go close some deals,

Chris

P.S. I realize that some of the big fast food chains offer none of the three, but they do offer fast food. If you're working with a independent dine-in restaurant the things I said above most certainly apply.
#birthday #catering #club #delivery #marketing consultant #money #offline marketing #restaurant
  • Profile picture of the author TheBigBee
    I never eat anywhere without first consulting Yelp - and sometimes Google.

    The lead in should be to offer reputation management for free as a "lure."

    "Look Mr. Restaurant Owner, I have a ton of ways I can help you get more customers, but the fact of the matter is, we have to clean up your reputation before any of that stuff is on the table.... I am going to help you get your reputation back, and then we can talk about other stuff when it's time."

    Offer this to 20 restaurants and see how many turn you down.

    I am sure you can send a ton of customers this weekend to the crappiest reviewed restaurant in town. They won't come back.

    You've opened up Pandoras box here... Most businesses are failing because they don't have LOYAL customers. Many don't have loyal customers because they do the minor things poorly. Smiling at the door, always a "can do" attitude, CLEANLINESS, community engagement, etc.

    20% of your customers earn 80% of your money. A lot of restaurants are running that 20% right out the door. I'd digress that one should lead in by doing whatever they can to expand that 20% as cheaply as possible.

    Great reviews is a good start.

    But what if the place just sucks... You know, it looks, feels, and smells crappy... Just walk away from that guy.
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    FILL IN THE BLANKS!
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  • Profile picture of the author Vikuna2009+
    Originally Posted by Chris Rivers View Post

    Hey Offliners,

    I'm going to throw a monkey wrench at you today.

    But, it will be worth it.

    See, I know that reputation management and mobile marketing is the hottest thing in offline marketing these days, but there is soooooo much more to getting diners to come through the door.

    Don't get me wrong.

    Reputation management is vitally important to a restaurant, but if a restaurant owner needed sales by this weekend, would he be clamoring to hire you to improve his online reputation?

    Probably not.

    However, if his reviews are in the toilet he definitely should be hiring you at some point, but just not for the weekend sales push.

    Anyway, I've always had a few concerns about offering reputation management in my offline business.

    For starters, what if their terrible reputation is earned and deserved? What do I do then?

    Put lipstick on a pig and pucker up?

    I think not.

    Of course I realize that most restaurants are run by good people trying to provide good food and good service, but the guy who has twenty or thirty bad reviews definitely has some issues.

    Now, when it comes to sms/mobile marketing, that has the potential to be a real gamechanger for most restaurants.

    However, are the marketing messages mostly discount driven?

    If so, that's a dangerous way for a restaurant owner to train his most loyal customers to take action and it can be the worst possible way to introduce people to the restaurant, unless a upsell funnel is in place.

    That's what makes Groupon so dangerous for most businesses.

    Just think about it for a moment.

    Would you only want your best clients to consistently hire you because you're running a sale and bleeding profits left and right.

    Of course not.

    In reality, you want clients to hire you at premium prices in exchange for providing premium value and services to them.

    Sure you can run a sale from time to time, but it certainly shouldn't be something you do every single day all day long.

    That's business suicide.

    I've personally learned that lesson the hard way.

    So, what's the answer to the question of what should you be trying to do for a restaurant to bring in more guests and diners.

    Well, the real money-makers are birthday party's and events related to birthdays, catering and delivery.

    That's where most of the independent restaurant owner's make a killing.

    They can add all types of valuable incentives and higher priced items when they are offering those specialty services.

    So, the real question is, are you going to be the marketing consultant to help them get those programs up and running.

    Or do they have to hire a expensive marketing consultant like me to do that while you're just running a back-linking campaign to push the good reviews above the bad ones for a few hundred dollars?

    I know which one I'd rather be, but that doesn't really matter.

    What really matters is which one would you rather be?

    Now, go close some deals,

    Chris

    P.S. I realize that some of the big fast food chains offer none of the three, but they do offer fast food. If you're working with a independent dine-in restaurant the things I said above most certainly apply.
    Funny this came up just now. I am in the middle of setting up a birthday club promotion for restaurants. Not only that, working on promoting restaurants with an auto responder service besides the birtday club concept as well.

    That is, working only with the ones that has their reputation intact. You have given me some additional ideas to ponder upon,

    thank you,

    Eva
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  • Profile picture of the author xichabodx
    I've never been a fan of rep management, especially if they deserve bad reviews.

    I've also shifted my focus on birthday marketing for restaurants. The medium to do so has yet to be determined -either postcards or via Facebook (you're able to target your ads to basically any demographic that's celebrating a birthday within a week).

    Through my research, I've found several entities that are doing this as their primary niche, with one making millions in revenue. Each have their own method (some send gift cards, some send postcards, while some are strictly online/mobile).
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