How Many Revisions Do You Give Clients?

7 replies
I have a client I'm currently working with redesigning their site. They emailed me a list of the changes they wanted to their original site and I confirmed it with them with an initial quote. I had it done within the week and since they had no revisions to make I went to collect the final payment yesterday.

Though, it turned into a 25 minute meeting of them going over changes they'd like to make. "-h and one more small thing..." was what he kept repeating adding "Can it be done in 3 days?" It was basically a meeting about a redesign of the redesign.

I told him I'd needed to readjust my quote since it's too low for all these revisions and give him a higher final quote. Not surprisingly I got an email with yet another revision to add before I quote him... I think he's not trying to take advantage; I just think he's not aware of what he's asking and how much time it takes do these changes

Any advice?
#clients #give #revisions
  • Profile picture of the author its
    You seem to have figured it out almost. Agree with the client before hand whether they will get free revisions or not. It's usually the smaller clients that are picky but bigger companies will trust you more.
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  • Profile picture of the author Huskerdarren
    You definitely want that spelled out. If it's not, you can almost certainly expect numerous other revisions that come over one by one.
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  • Profile picture of the author Andrew H
    Yeah you should have the number of revisions in the contract.

    If you can convince them to pay more for the revisions, that would be great!
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  • Profile picture of the author Jason Kanigan
    Three.

    And I make it clear before they sign up.

    Never had a problem.
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    • Profile picture of the author Marty S
      [DELETED]
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      • Profile picture of the author ChaletDM
        I find that most people I work with are very reasonable in regards to revisions. They understand that revisions are taking up your time and as a result they try to keep them to a minimum. It is good to inform the client beforehand how many revisions they can have. Three is a very reasonable number and yes, you should make sure it is in the contract.

        Having said that, if you are just starting out, you may want to do what I did and "go overboard". For your first few clients you want to have them raving about your services, and if this means multiple revisions to get it just like they want it...so be it. They will rave about you to their business contacts and their testimonial will help grow your business exponentially.
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  • Profile picture of the author webzie
    My limit on revisions often is determined by the client's budget. A very low budget may only get one round of revisions. A larger budget gets 3. I can't say I've ever built more than 3 rounds of revisions into a contract.

    But my question to you is how do you determine what constitutes a "round of revisions"? It's easier to tell with something like a logo design. But when working on a project with more components (like a brochure, or a website, that has design/copy/programming involved), I think it is trickier to tell.
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    • Profile picture of the author Jason Kanigan
      Originally Posted by webzie View Post

      My limit on revisions often is determined by the client’s budget. A very low budget may only get one round of revisions. A larger budget gets 3. I can’t say I’ve ever built more than 3 rounds of revisions into a contract.

      But my question to you is how do you determine what constitutes a “round of revisions”? It’s easier to tell with something like a logo design. But when working on a project with more components (like a brochure, or a website, that has design/copy/programming involved), I think it is trickier to tell.
      I clearly define those for my web design & copywriting prospects before they become clients. I tell them: "A revision is: I give you something. You look at it, and tell me what if anything you'd like to change. We discuss and I make those changes. That's a revision round. You get three of these. After that, we're on the clock and the rate is $X." Simple. Never needed more than one.

      Train your prospects beforehand and things will be much easier later.
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