should i show prices on a lead gen cleaning website/

10 replies
Hi all, just an idea i have had. I have noticed on my local competition cleaning websites that nobody has prices online. could this possibly be an advantage for my website?

I intend to get traffic to the site and then sell the leads to another cleaning firm in the area. Can anyone suggest any other ideas?

Much appreciated, Jase
#cleaning #gen #lead #prices #show #website or
  • Profile picture of the author umc
    So you want to generate leads for cleaning. Is this residential or commercial? Do you know anything about cleaning?
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  • Profile picture of the author Jason Kanigan
    Using the Search button would show you this question has been asked and answered many times.

    If you want to qualify your prospects based on price, show your prices.

    If you want them to call you to have a conversation and find out if you're a fit, give them a great call to action.
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    • Profile picture of the author umc
      If cleaning companies aren't showing prices up front, there's a reason. I clean every day in my business and am part of a cleaning association with other companies. We usually don't show prices because every home is different. A bathroom can have a toilet, sink, and tub, or it could be a master suite with a bath that has a glass enclosed double shower with a separate jetted tub, double sink, and separate toilet area. Materials differ from house to house. It takes us much longer to vacuum and mop wood or tile floors than it does to vacuum carpeted floors. Some homes have minimal decor, and others have knick knacks everywhere. Some have basic white appliances, and others have stainless which requires both cleaning and polishing.

      So it is difficult to ever have prices standardized enough to put them out there. That's why you're not seeing them.
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      • Profile picture of the author umc
        I'll go ahead and throw this out there too. You may want to have a cleaner lined up to take the leads before generating them. Why? Just speaking from my own experience, but I have an overflow of leads in my cleaning business. I've had a hard time finding people to take them for free, much less to buy them. Many want us and only us and are on a waiting list. Have had people wait over a year to get us to clean for them until a spot opened in our schedule.
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        • Profile picture of the author homeriscool
          Originally Posted by umc View Post

          I'll go ahead and throw this out there too. You may want to have a cleaner lined up to take the leads before generating them. Why? Just speaking from my own experience, but I have an overflow of leads in my cleaning business. I've had a hard time finding people to take them for free, much less to buy them. Many want us and only us and are on a waiting list. Have had people wait over a year to get us to clean for them until a spot opened in our schedule.
          very informative answer thanks very much for your time! I am in a cleaning industry, not domestic though...
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  • Profile picture of the author misterme
    I would also think the reason to not show prices is because if you do, potential customers then believe they have all the information they need to make a decision and start shopping your price. In other words they'll make a price based decision at the very onset. That will also weed out those who may have done business with you (if you only had the chance to talk with them a bit) but either thought your price was too high or too good to be true.
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    • Profile picture of the author umc
      Originally Posted by misterme View Post

      I would also think the reason to not show prices is because if you do, potential customers then believe they have all the information they need to make a decision and start shopping your price. In other words they'll make a price based decision at the very onset. That will also weed out those who may have done business with you (if you only had the chance to talk with them a bit) but either thought your price was too high or too good to be true.
      Very true. The most that we do is that we provide a form that can be filled out for a quick quote. That way we capture the lead for follow up at the outset. After they fill it out, I email them more information about us along with a price range for their consideration based on the info provided. That helps us weed out those looking for someone really cheap while not committing to a specific price.
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      • Profile picture of the author Jason Kanigan
        Originally Posted by umc View Post

        Very true. The most that we do is that we provide a form that can be filled out for a quick quote. That way we capture the lead for follow up at the outset. After they fill it out, I email them more information about us along with a price range for their consideration based on the info provided. That helps us weed out those looking for someone really cheap while not committing to a specific price.
        The idea here is to run YOUR process, not your prospect's.

        Your prospect, as we've seen, is often not educated up enough to make a correct decision. Left alone they will go with the lowest price because they don't know any better.

        We must (politely) interrupt their process and put our own in. Here's a post I wrote about this concept. You can apply it to web design by anticipating the visitor's thinking and providing actions for them to take that take them down the path you want.

        http://www.warriorforum.com/offline-...vanishing.html
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        • Profile picture of the author umc
          Jason man, I love your posts, but I close probably 90% of anyone that ever fills out a forrm, I have a waiting list for services that runs 20+ families deep, and people often only use the form because they were referred to us and want to contact us in that way vs. the phone. My prospects are highly educated about who and what they want for the most part.

          You cannot keep price shoppers from occasionally coming your way, I don't care what kind of sales voodoo you use. I get people coming to me and I don't even advertise. People find my site, and occasionally go straight for the quick quote no matter how much I try to inform anyone as to what we do because all they care about is price. They aren't going to read further regardless. By giving them a price range I give them the opportunity to tip their hand as to whether or not they want to pay a respectable price, as there are people that clean Nah sized house for $50 on Craigslist. I cannot prevent those people from coming to me, and those that devalue our service to that point are simply a waste of time. You can't make someone pay twice as much if all they care about is price no matter what value you try to build. There are a percentage that only care about that, and I weed them out rather than wasting my time. In the past we didn't provide even a range, and I wasted time driving around to homes of people with ridiculous expectations. Now I pre-sell the majority of folks that contact me, and that's what marketing is all about. I even have people leave blank checks and let us do our thing. Can't beat that.

          So your claims about my uneducated prospects and about whose process I'm running are reaching a bit.
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  • Profile picture of the author Jason Kanigan
    UMC, what you're talking about is Qualifying your prospect. If all they care about is the price, do you want them as a customer? That's your choice isn't it. There's part of your process.

    Doesn't have to be a form...could be an opt-in report or simple page listing 7 things they need to know when choosing a cleaner. That positions you as The Only, of course.

    Could be a "To give you the right quote, I need to understand your situation. Call me at ### to discuss."

    In my last post I was talking in general, not specifically about your process. What you say about weeding them out is exactly right. People need to read about your specific example though and my comments about it.
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