Prospecting Objection: Send me some information

46 replies
This may have been already addressed somewhere in this forum but I couldn't find it and I'm curious to other's people philosophy or response to this objection when cold call prospecting.

We know that usually when we hear this "trying to to get salespeople off the phone" objection during prospecting calls it is usually a put off and if you don't have a relationship with the prospect your information email is going to meet the delete button.

Some salespeople find it valuable to send something as a last ditch effort with a possible follow up call and other salespeople think that the strategy is a waste of time and try to qualify before sending anything.

I've even heard some salespeople don't even bother with that and simply sort with with speed and go to the next call.

How do you view and handle the "send me information" prospecting objection?
#information #objection #prospecting #send
  • Profile picture of the author Jason Kanigan
    "I could...tell me, what will that help you with deciding?"

    Unclear answer = "Sounds like you're not interested, and I should hang up and close the file." Wait for their response.

    If they do give a clear answer, you can address it.

    If you do have to send information, which I don't recommend, at least you can make it address their specific issue. And set a time limit. "How long do you think you'll need to review this information?" Book a call to check back with them then.

    As this is almost always a put-off by the prospect, you most likely will qualify them Out. But you can find out quickly.

    "Sending information" usually results in spinning your wheels.
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    • Profile picture of the author joecarson1
      yes I could send you an email with more info, but there is nothing in the email that we cant cover right now or via an appointment to talk in the future...

      you see my boss my partners my wife my dog have advised me to call all of your competitors next and not waste time sending emails but your version of your business stood out to me as someone worth working with

      so lets go over my offer now or set a time to talk in the next day or two
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      • Profile picture of the author misterme
        Originally Posted by joecarson1 View Post

        yes I could send you an email with more info, but there is nothing in the email that we cant cover right now or via an appointment to talk in the future...
        I was going to point that out. "Send you information? Better than that, I can give you the information right now. Just let me ask you first..."
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        • Profile picture of the author Claude Whitacre
          Originally Posted by misterme View Post

          I was going to point that out. "Send you information? Better than that, I can give you the information right now. Just let me ask you first..."
          Strong stuff. I don't sell over the phone. I make appointments to see business owners. This is the best answer I've come up with.

          "Can you send me some information?'
          "No. I want to meet you. After after we talk for 5 minutes, you can decide if we should schedule an appointment later. Will you be there tomorrow at 3PM?" See? I'm not even asking them for an appointment, just a chance to meet them. There is very little to say "No" to. I picked up the idea in a sales book, I think. No idea which one.

          I'm not kidding, about a third of the time, they say OK.

          And, here what I say after every objection to an appointment.

          "I'm happy with what I have now".
          Me "Then what we have will fit you nicely. We need to meet. Will you be there at 3PM tomorrow?"

          "We advertise on Yellowpages.com, Yelp, and Angies list already"

          Me; "Then we have to meet. Will you be there tomorrow at 3PM?"

          A few weeks ago, I was thinking about how kids ask their parent's to get ice cream...."Mom, I want, Mom, I want, Mom, I want...." And then the mom just says OK. It just popped into my little brain.

          See, the objections aren't real. They are a reflex. That's why having the perfect answer doesn't work. You are battling something that doesn't exist.

          Imagine you ask a girl on a date;

          "I'm sorry, that night, I'm washing my hair"..

          So now, you start talking about how she shampoos her hair, you start asking her how long it takes to dry....why isn't this working? Because the objection wasn't real.

          My saying "We need to meet. Will you be there tomorrow at 3PM?" works for one simple reason. There is nothing to say "No" to. There is no rebuttal that makes sense. All they can do is say "Not interested, bye!" and hang up before you say, "Not interested? Then we have to meet. Will you be there tomorrow at 3PM?"

          About one out of three calls (out of maybe 50 contacts, so far) have resulted in an appointment.

          I'll answer three stalls. I found that after the first couple of objections, it degrades into a contest, a contest I don't want to play.

          A little of it may be that my voice is very "I'm a businessman, just like you, and you want to talk to me".

          I never call anyone back. I'm just asking for an appointment, not for a donated kidney.
          If they can't decide on an appointment, I'm not interested in them.


          I probably would never have developed this quick method, if I hadn't been writing a book on prospecting, and needed some field testing.

          I would never use this to close a sale, but to get an appointment? Absolutely.

          Oh, here are my real results;

          No idea how many dials, maybe 80.
          51 contacts with the business owner.
          15 appointments booked
          7 I actually got to talk to. these are all in a local town near mine. I never go back if they stand me up.
          2 sales. One for $3,999 and one for $5,999. These people are only qualified by the kind of business they own, and that they will be there.

          Because they are all local, I just qualify when I'm there. Half the time, one of us decides that it's not going to work out.

          I'm not closing 80% of these appointments, like I do on referrals, (assuming I give a presentation), but about a third. Sometimes, I quit in the middle But so far, two out of three, that I gave an entire presentation to, bought.

          I also should say that these are long presentations. If they buy, I have to create videos on the spot (it also keeps them from cancelling). I may be there three and a half hours.

          Remember, they don't know me at all when I call. It takes awhile to position myself in their mind, and establish value. And I get far more objections to buying. I actually have to sell to get these sales. Something I'm not used to now.

          Anyway, I hope it helped someone.
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          • Profile picture of the author mak25
            Damn Claude, that's one hell of a post.

            Thanks for that.
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          • Profile picture of the author misterme
            Originally Posted by Claude Whitacre View Post


            See, the objections aren't real. They are a reflex. That's why having the perfect answer doesn't work. You are battling something that doesn't exist.
            Exactly.

            As you may recall, Claude, I'm currently writing a book on handling objections for professionals in my field (although it's applicable to any field) and one of the things I bring up is that the term "objections" is a catch-all name. And so it's misleading because there are different "objections" like the one you bring up which is pure and simple, a stall. And stalls are mostly made up or based on the flimsiest of reasons, stretched to sound plausible.

            And then the sales person's mistake is in being reactive and trying to overcome that trumped up excuse. That's equivalent to wrestling with shadows.

            Worse yet, they try to overcome that objection by using one-size-fits-all methods they've been taught to handle ANY AND ALL objections when obviously as just pointed out not all alleged objections are equal. And so there's different ways to work this depending on the type of so called objection.

            And it doesn't work. And the sales person gets frustrated. No wonder.

            Instead of being reactive, what's really needed is for sales people to step up and have a game plan. (and yeah, that's got to be in my book too).
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            • Profile picture of the author Claude Whitacre
              Originally Posted by misterme View Post

              Exactly.

              As you may recall, Claude, I'm currently writing a book on handling objections for professionals in my field (although it's applicable to any field) and one of the things I bring up is that the term "objections" is a catch-all name. And so it's misleading because there are different "objections" like the one you bring up which is pure and simple, a stall. And stalls are mostly made up or based on the flimsiest of reasons, stretched to sound plausible.

              And then the sales person's mistake is in being reactive and trying to overcome that trumped up excuse. That's equivalent to wrestling with shadows.

              Worse yet, they try to overcome that objection by using one-size-fits-all methods they've been taught to handle ANY AND ALL objections when obviously as just pointed out not all alleged objections are equal. And so there's different ways to work this depending on the type of so called objection.

              And it doesn't work. And the sales person gets frustrated. No wonder.

              Instead of being reactive, what's really needed is for sales people to step up and have a game plan. (and yeah, that's got to be in my book too).
              Also, in your book, may I suggest you add; "I learned everything I know from that genius, Claude Whitacre. He has inspired me, and taken my business to new heights. I would be nothing without the enlightened guidance of...my mentor...my friend....the Great Claude Whitacre."

              I was going to go ever the top with this, but humility and good taste prevents me.

              By the way, my "Thanks" to your posts is number "666".
              Muuuhuuuhaaahaa!
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          • Profile picture of the author MNord
            Originally Posted by Claude Whitacre View Post


            "I'm happy with what I have now".
            Claude: In your experience, have you found people that voice this particular objection to be any more or less likely to accept an appointment than others?
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            • Profile picture of the author Claude Whitacre
              Originally Posted by MNord View Post

              Claude: In your experience, have you found people that voice this particular objection to be any more or less likely to accept an appointment than others?
              Not more or less. That objection is a reflex. It's what they told the last 500 salespeople that called them. It's like saying "How are you?".

              And here is a reality. The vast majority of people you talk to, are happy with hat they have right now. They are happy with their supplier...at least enough to not change.

              Don't try to change their minds on the phone, that's a monumental task, that is better served during he presentation.

              Remember, I sold vacuum cleaners for 30 years. Every person I talked to, was happy with what they had before i got there.

              There are two approaches that I like.

              One, is simply give them a gift for an appointment. Then the objection doesn't matter. They will make the appointment just to get the gift.

              But here is a way the I have used that works far more often than not.

              'I'm already happy with my supplier"

              "Nearly all my clients have told me that. Are you with (a competitor) right now?"

              "Yes"
              "Then you really should meet with me (said in a slightly lower tone). Will you be there tomorrow at 3PM?"

              But what if they say "No" or "No, I'm with...

              "Then you really should meet with me (said in a slightly lower tone). Will you be there tomorrow at 3PM?"

              I'm not kidding, about a third of the time, they will just make the appointment. Why? No real idea, but I have a theory.
              My theory is that now, they think you have inside information you are going to share with them.

              And if they say "Tell me now". Just say "No. It's better if you hear this in person. Will you be there tomorrow at 3PM?"

              It's very hard to say "No" to that.

              Human nature is fun to watch.

              added later; Do you want to know how I handle it on the appointment?
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  • Profile picture of the author kemdev
    I think this response comes out because they're not very interested, they just want your price to compare to the last 10 people they told this to, and they want to get you off the phone without telling you no. At least, if this objection is happening very early on in the call.

    You can try to qualify them here but I think most would say no they're not interested. Your best bet is to blow past this objection and keep them on the phone for as long as possible while you dig into what they're looking for.

    "Sure I can do that. What type of information are you looking for, so I know what to send?"

    Might as well find out what you'll need to sell to them. Typically the biggest things I hear at this point are 1) they want to know the price 2) they want to know whether or not the site will look good 3) everything that's included with the site

    The bolded one seems to be what everyone is always concerned about. I use this to build curiosity.

    "You haven't heard?"

    "Many small business owners are now realizing that the look of their website isn't nearly as important as how much exposure it gets... at least if we're talking about producing leads and ROI. Are you looking for something pretty or are you more interested in the results a great website can produce?"

    Just a small exchange to build curiosity and keep them on the call. I look at this objection (again, if it's happening very early) to be a knee-jerk reaction of sorts. They just want to get you off the phone and maybe get your price for free if they can. You could qualify out, but you'll get more mileage out of your leads if you have an exchange like the one above to get them curious and differentiate yourself from the last 10 guys who called.
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  • Profile picture of the author focusedlife
    That's exactly why I only call after I've sent out emails and I only follow up or "cold call" those that have opened up my emails, preferrably more than once and generally linger at at what I've read them for more than a few minutes.

    I genreally send out about 10 - 20 emails per day when I'm in prospecting mode, and I only call or follow up with the ones that show strong indications of interest, but for some reason, have not phoned me yet.

    I use Whoreadme.com or spypig to deal with the figuring out which ones to call.

    No longer is "send me some information" an issue for me in my business or those that have taken coaching with me.

    I do hope that was helpful and of course, if its unclear please ask.

    Regards

    Los
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  • Profile picture of the author bob ross
    This is one of the most common objections my calling team gets and it's something we handle a dozen or more times per day.

    I train them to agree to send information, which lowers their guard instantly.

    Them: "Send me some information and I'll look it over"

    us: "Okay sure, no problem! What's your email address?"

    Them: "bigbopper99@yahoo.com"

    us: "Okay great, now what exactly do you want information on, the X product or X product or X service?

    Them: "X service..."

    us: "so you're mostly interested in X huh. are you doing a lot of advertising now or?...."

    the acceptance to give info is just theatrics. Their guard is letdown and they'll talk and talk and talk not even realizing you're setting them up for an appt, or pitch, or close.

    This works incredibly well and is the easiest way I've found for callers to handle the objection. To me, it's always about "being on the same side of the table with them" and not making statements that put you "across the table".

    If you can't get anywhere with them at least you've got their email and a good lead to put in your database for followup.
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    • Profile picture of the author Claude Whitacre
      Originally Posted by bob ross View Post


      Them: "Send me some information and I'll look it over"

      us: "Okay sure, no problem! What's your email address?"

      Them: "bigbopper99@yahoo.com"

      us: "Okay great, now what exactly do you want information on, the X product or X product or X service?

      Them: "X service..."

      us: "so you're mostly interested in X huh. are you doing a lot of advertising now or?...."

      the acceptance to give info is just theatrics. Their guard is letdown and they'll talk and talk and talk not even realizing you're setting them up for an appt, or pitch, or close.
      I like this a lot. Thanks.
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    • Profile picture of the author kenmichaels
      Originally Posted by bob ross View Post

      This is one of the most common objections my calling team gets and it's something we handle a dozen or more times per day.

      I train them to agree to send information, which lowers their guard instantly.

      Them: "Send me some information and I'll look it over"

      us: "Okay sure, no problem! What's your email address?"

      Them: "bigbopper99@yahoo.com"

      us: "Okay great, now what exactly do you want information on, the X product or X product or X service?

      Them: "X service..."

      us: "so you're mostly interested in X huh. are you doing a lot of advertising now or?...."

      the acceptance to give info is just theatrics. Their guard is letdown and they'll talk and talk and talk not even realizing you're setting them up for an appt, or pitch, or close.

      This works incredibly well and is the easiest way I've found for callers to handle the objection. To me, it's always about "being on the same side of the table with them" and not making statements that put you "across the table".

      If you can't get anywhere with them at least you've got their email and a good lead to put in your database for followup.

      Do your guys close over the phone or is it app setting?

      Also where do they say "send info" is it in the first minute or so
      or later after a close?

      I like the way you handle it. I don't get asked to send info much
      and when I do, 99% of the time it is because I messed up somewhere.

      Example: I did not address there needs, desire or completely
      missed something that makes them push away by asking for
      info.
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      • Profile picture of the author bob ross
        Originally Posted by kenmichaels View Post

        Do your guys close over the phone or is it app setting?

        Also where do they say "send info" is it in the first minute or so
        or later after a close?

        I like the way you handle it. I don't get asked to send info much
        and when I do, 99% of the time it is because I messed up somewhere.

        Example: I did not address there needs, desire or completely
        missed something that makes them push away by asking for
        info.
        I have callers who's mission is to get the prospects on the phone with their manager (who is the closer). The closer then handles the conversation and tries to close the deal for something as well as get them to accept a quote for a bigger project.

        Then the consultant (who often doubles as closer too) will contact them after receiving the quote and close them on a discounted special offer that's currently running.

        It's a multi-step process we've systemized that let's us attempt to close deals on each step can but also keep relationships going if it can't.

        A lot of the "send more info" is when they're too busy to talk but they're interested. When we handle it this way they either take the time to keep talking (and they turn out to be not so busy), or as we keep asking questions the truth comes out and they say nevermind I'm not interested.

        When there is an actual conversation going (not rushed), but they give the "send more info" line, we still go through the same looping process of "figuring out exactly what info they want" and continuing to ask questions and get commitments.

        Most of the time during the "determining what information to send" theatrics we will have narrowed down exactly what they want, have gotten a commitment of what they can afford, and gotten them to commit to the fact that if we can make it affordable they'll go ahead.

        Then we can try to close them on a first time customer discount or we can actually send them a quote and then close them on a discounted price. If they commit to $300 per week for example... we'll quote them at $395 per week and then close them on a variety of 'special circumstances' that would make it $280 per week if they can jump on it now.
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      • Profile picture of the author misterme
        Originally Posted by kenmichaels View Post

        Do your guys close over the phone or is it app setting?

        Also where do they say "send info" is it in the first minute or so
        or later after a close?
        For me, it's appointment setting. 99.99% of the time the inquiry will start off by contacting me asking to be sent information.
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    • Profile picture of the author MNord
      Originally Posted by bob ross View Post

      This is one of the most common objections my calling team gets and it's something we handle a dozen or more times per day.

      I train them to agree to send information, which lowers their guard instantly.

      Them: "Send me some information and I'll look it over"

      us: "Okay sure, no problem! What's your email address?"

      Them: "bigbopper99@yahoo.com"

      us: "Okay great, now what exactly do you want information on, the X product or X product or X service?

      Them: "X service..."

      us: "so you're mostly interested in X huh. are you doing a lot of advertising now or?...."

      the acceptance to give info is just theatrics. Their guard is letdown and they'll talk and talk and talk not even realizing you're setting them up for an appt, or pitch, or close.

      This works incredibly well and is the easiest way I've found for callers to handle the objection. To me, it's always about "being on the same side of the table with them" and not making statements that put you "across the table".

      If you can't get anywhere with them at least you've got their email and a good lead to put in your database for followup.
      This is the approach I always used. What I was selling was pretty high ticket (5-6 figs) and I had a fairly large territory--I NEEDED to qualify prospects before meeting with them. This approach allows that.

      If it had been a smaller/simpler sale it would have been interesting to try Claude's approach.
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      • Profile picture of the author Claude Whitacre
        Originally Posted by MNord View Post

        This is the approach I always used. What I was selling was pretty high ticket (5-6 figs) and I had a fairly large territory--I NEEDED to qualify prospects before meeting with them. This approach allows that.

        If it had been a smaller/simpler sale it would have been interesting to try Claude's approach.
        I was thinking that Bob's approach was to sell over the phone. I just want an excuse to see them. I wouldn't use my approach if I were driving an hour just for one appointment. In that case, I would qualify as to money, what they are doing now, and that they can make a decision. It would be a much longer conversation.
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        • Profile picture of the author MNord
          Originally Posted by Claude Whitacre View Post

          I was thinking that Bob's approach was to sell over the phone. I just want an excuse to see them. I wouldn't use my approach if I were driving an hour just for one appointment. In that case, I would qualify as to money, what they are doing now, and that they can make a decision. It would be a much longer conversation.
          Right--I didn't mean to imply that you thought otherwise. It's a different type of sale.

          I've been around the forum a while (although just started posting) and it is clear that you know what you are doing .
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  • Profile picture of the author AlexTee
    This is a Tom Hopkins technique I learned many years ago that I still use today:

    Mr/Ms prospect, usually when someone asks me to send them information its one of two things
    a) they really are interested and want more information or...
    b) they aren't interested and asking for information is just a polite way of saying so...

    which is the case here?

    There should be total silence on your part until they answer....when they do answer you will know how to proceed.

    If they want information make sure it is something that require some action on their part such as a survey, or executive summary, or a case study/white paper that require further information from you that address how your company/product/service solves the problem.

    DO NOT SEND A BROCHURE.

    The mistake most salespeople make when they send information is what they send is nothing more than some generic company brochure that is useless and as a result....they waste their time.

    Sending "valuable thought provoking information" should not be a last ditch effort but part of your cold calling strategy.

    Hope this helps.
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    • Profile picture of the author misterme
      Originally Posted by Claude Whitacre View Post

      Also, in your book, may I suggest you add; "I learned everything I know from that genius, Claude Whitacre. He has inspired me, and taken my business to new heights. I would be nothing without the enlightened guidance of...my mentor...my friend....the Great Claude Whitacre."
      I know you're joking but my mother might see this and mistakenly think I learned everything I know from you and that wouldn't be right because I learned everything from me dear ol' mum. Just look at her face - you wouldn't want to break her heart, would you?



      Originally Posted by AlexTee View Post

      This is a Tom Hopkins technique I learned many years ago that I still use today:

      Mr/Ms prospect, usually when someone asks me to send them information its one of two things
      a) they really are interested and want more information or...
      b) they aren't interested and asking for information is just a polite way of saying so...

      which is the case here?

      There should be total silence on your part until they answer....when they do answer you will know how to proceed.
      That still works? Because these days how is it you don't trust their first response when they say 'send me info' because you know it's probably a stall, but trust their second response though that's probably a stall too?

      "Oh, don't get me wrong. I'm genuinely interested. It's just that right now I have a meeting to prepare for and then I'll be out of town for business for two weeks. I'll be able to look over your information then while I'm holed up in a hotel room. How soon can you shoot me over that information?"
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      • Profile picture of the author Claude Whitacre
        Originally Posted by misterme View Post

        That still works? Because these days how is it you don't trust their first response when they say 'send me info' because you know it's probably a stall, but trust their second response though that's probably a stall too?

        "Oh, don't get me wrong. I'm genuinely interested. It's just that right now I have a meeting to prepare for and then I'll be out of town for business for two weeks. I'll be able to look over your information then while I'm holed up in a hotel room. How soon can you shoot me over that information?"
        I've used this very technique extensively, years ago. But my experience is that the prospect will usually just reinforce whatever they told you before.

        Now, I just like to say "No. I want to meet you". About a third of the time, they say "OK", and about two thirds of the time, they hang up....

        But I don't care. I just want to get off the phone, and talk to someone who won't jerk me around.
        It's much easier to mine for gold, than it is to try to argue with mud, until it turns into gold. That's only when prospecting.

        When closing? I'm like a pit bull. If I've invested 90 minutes of my life with them already...somebody's going to pay.

        But there are prospecting approaches, that are very effective, where you try to build rapport, then a relationship, then make an appointment, then court them...it just isn't me.

        Kanigan does that more than I do, and here is a (non affiliate) link to a book that lays that type of approach out for you.

        Smart Calling: Eliminate the Fear, Failure, and Rejection from Cold Calling: Art Sobczak: 9781118588710: Amazon.com: Books
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        • Profile picture of the author savidge4
          Originally Posted by Claude Whitacre View Post

          If I've invested 90 minutes of my life with them already...somebody's going to pay.
          Claude.. that right there is the best line of the thread! Now THAT is sales!
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          • Profile picture of the author joe golfer
            Quote:
            Originally Posted by Claude Whitacre
            If I've invested 90 minutes of my life with them already...somebody's going to pay.

            Originally Posted by savidge4 View Post

            Claude.. that right there is the best line of the thread! Now THAT is sales!
            Not bad. But I like Claude's line "It's much easier to mine for gold than it is to try to argue with mud until it turns into gold."
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            • Profile picture of the author Claude Whitacre
              Originally Posted by joe golfer View Post

              Not bad. But I like, "It's much easier to mine for gold than it is to try to argue with mud until it turns into gold."
              I love it. May I quote you?
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              • Profile picture of the author joe golfer
                Originally Posted by Claude Whitacre View Post

                I love it. May I quote you?
                Nope, I got dibs. It's already in my sig.

                (I fixed my first reference above because it wasn't clear from my quote that it was your line.)
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            • Profile picture of the author savidge4
              Originally Posted by joe golfer View Post

              Quote:
              Originally Posted by Claude Whitacre
              If I've invested 90 minutes of my life with them already...somebody's going to pay.



              Not bad. But I like, "It's much easier to mine for gold than it is to try to argue with mud until it turns into gold."
              That one was right up there for sure... But if you could apply just enough pressure.. it COULD happen! Oh wait.. that's coal... well I'm from WV so mud coal, same thing!
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      • Profile picture of the author AlexTee
        Originally Posted by misterme View Post

        I know you're joking but my mother might see this and mistakenly think I learned everything I know from you and that wouldn't be right because I learned everything from me dear ol' mum. Just look at her face - you wouldn't want to break her heart, would you?





        That still works? Because these days how is it you don't trust their first response when they say 'send me info' because you know it's probably a stall, but trust their second response though that's probably a stall too?

        "Oh, don't get me wrong. I'm genuinely interested. It's just that right now I have a meeting to prepare for and then I'll be out of town for business for two weeks. I'll be able to look over your information then while I'm holed up in a hotel room. How soon can you shoot me over that information?"
        Yep, it still does…

        Every prospect is not going to become a customer. I'm looking for the right prospect not just any prospect.

        It's not a matter of trust at this juncture so I don't place that much emotion behind it.

        It's just a weed out question for me….those that say "no" really aren't interested and those that say "yes" and give me their email get logged in as a person to call back in a couple of days but no longer than a week.

        I work within a vertical market when cold calling so I can have the same information (executive summary, case study, etc.) ready to go in advance as an attachment and my email open, I simply put in the email they gave me and click send.

        Then I'm on to the next call.
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  • Profile picture of the author misterme
    Actually, though up to now most of my phone work is about getting appointments I recently went through a bout doing direct sales on the phone. That's to say my gal did. And she got a lot of "send me an email with more information" and what I did at first was have her say "I'll give you the information now" (which works for me) but many of the calls expressed they were pressed for time so I then had her try Bob Ross' "ok, what's your email address and what exactly..." and still didn't close. Not to say none of that worked because she may have come across as hard but we only had a few days to get this done so it wasn't something I was going to get into heavily and be able to refine. So for the ones who asked for an email, I'd send them a pitch in the email and call their bluff - and I got call backs. Either that or I called back directly to give them information.

    And what I found was they were looking to get me to give it to them for free. They dangled who they allegedly know, their connections, what they could do for me, blah, blah. Others still had to "think about it" though there wasn't much to think about. Some tried to demean me personally, others belittle what I was doing to tear down its value. Real wolves, some of them.

    And that's what was behind the request for more information.

    The ones who bought - not one of them requested more information. Not a one.

    Granted this is a tiny limited sampling. But it seems to me if they're busy and can't talk, "send me info" isn't what someone who's busy and can't talk says. They're going to say they're busy and can't talk and can you call back. NOT I'm busy and can't talk but can you send me information so that later when I'm not busy and can take the time for it, I can look into it further in a way where I don't have to talk to you.
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    • Profile picture of the author jamesfreddyc
      Originally Posted by misterme View Post

      Others still had to "think about it" though there wasn't much to think about. Some tried to demean me personally, others belittle what I was doing to tear down its value. Real wolves, some of them.

      And that's what was behind the request for more information.
      Sounds like you could have avoided all of that with another "Kanigan":

      "No problem, I will send that out right away. Is Friday a good day to follow up with you?

      Great!

      One last thing before I let you go, I am perfectly happy to follow up and discuss this in more detail. All that I ask is at the end of our conversation and I have answered all of your questions, that you give me a definitive "yes" or a "no". The reason why is because in the past when I got a "need to think about it", all I really was getting was a "no" with another waiting period attached to it. So I simply just don't do that anymore.

      So can you commit to that yes or no for me now?"

      Or something like that....I can't remember exactly which post that was from.

      You get your answer right then and there, no waiting and time following up with a poor prospect.
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      • Profile picture of the author ewenmack
        To me, it's a symptom of not giving enough value, intrigue
        up front which can't be compared to anything else
        they have experienced.

        Work on the causes, not slapping on a band aid.

        Best,
        Ewen
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    • Profile picture of the author Claude Whitacre
      Originally Posted by misterme View Post

      The ones who bought - not one of them requested more information. Not a one.
      And that information was fought for.

      I'll bet eventually, you would have one buy...just like in 30 years of in home sales...and 40% of the prospects swearing to God...that they would buy later...I eventually did have one buy later. One in 6,000.

      See, little ones? This information will save you lots of tears, and time.


      Originally Posted by jamesfreddyc View Post

      Sounds like you could have avoided all of that with another "Kanigan":

      "No problem, I will send that out right away. Is Friday a good day to follow up with you?

      Great!

      One last thing before I let you go, I am perfectly happy to follow up and discuss this in more detail. All that I ask is at the end of our conversation and I have answered all of your questions, that you give me a definitive "yes" or a "no". The reason why is because in the past when I got a "need to think about it", all I really was getting was a "no" with another waiting period attached to it. So I simply just don't do that anymore.

      So can you commit to that yes or no for me now?"

      Or something like that....I can't remember exactly which post that was from.

      You get your answer right then and there, no waiting and time following up with a poor prospect.
      Jim; You sound intelligent, so I'll treat you that way.

      The approach Jake (Bob Ross) uses, to take them from "Send me some information", to "what information do you want?" to "Let's talk about that now"...is very sound. In fact, I like it better than what I do. The only reason I don't use it, is that I'm getting an appointment and he is selling over the phone.

      But the "At the end, do you agree to tell me Yes or No?" idea, I've tested over a couple of years. I mean real tests, with hundreds of presentations. It doesn't help. my apologies to Jason. But I've never seen it affect the result.

      Why? At the end of the presentation, they will still be the same person. If they want to buy...they will still say "Yes". If they don't want to buy...they will still say "I want to think about it". It's just a reflexive response. What they agree to, at the beginning, has nothing to do with how they respond at the end.

      Again, I did this every day for about 2 years. I taught my salespeople to do the same thing. As an office, we closed 41% of our presentations no matter if we did this or not.

      We also lowered our price by 25% one month to see if that would increase sales...Nope. Not even 1%.

      You know what increased sales? Telling them the price up front, and asking them about their finances up front. That helped dramatically, because it changed our positioning in their mind. And sometimes we wouldn't do a presentation if they just weren't capable of getting financed. (This is a very hard thing to teach)

      You know what else increased sales? Refusing, for any reason, to present unless (if a couple) both were there. No matter what they promised.

      In cold calling, leaving hints that the last several people bought, also helps.
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      • Profile picture of the author savidge4
        Originally Posted by Claude Whitacre View Post

        And that information was fought for.

        I'll bet eventually, you would have one buy...just like in 30 years of in home sales...and 40% of the prospects swearing to God...that they would buy later...I eventually did have one buy later. One in 6,000.

        See, little ones? This information will save you lots of tears, and time.




        Jim; You sound intelligent, so I'll treat you that way.

        The approach Jake (Bob Ross) uses, to take them from "Send me some information", to "what information do you want?" to "Let's talk about that now"...is very sound. In fact, I like it better than what I do. The only reason I don't use it, is that I'm getting an appointment and he is selling over the phone.

        But the "At the end, do you agree to tell me Yes or No?" idea, I've tested over a couple of years. I mean real tests, with hundreds of presentations. It doesn't help. my apologies to Jason. But I've never seen it affect the result.

        Why? At the end of the presentation, they will still be the same person. If they want to buy...they will still say "Yes". If they don't want to buy...they will still say "I want to think about it". It's just a reflexive response. What they agree to, at the beginning, has nothing to do with how they respond at the end.

        Again, I did this every day for about 2 years. I taught my salespeople to do the same thing. As an office, we closed 41% of our presentations no matter if we did this or not.

        We also lowered our price by 25% one month to see if that would increase sales...Nope. Not even 1%.

        You know what increased sales? Telling them the price up front, and asking them about their finances up front. That helped dramatically, because it changed our positioning in their mind. And sometimes we wouldn't do a presentation if they just weren't capable of getting financed. (This is a very hard thing to teach)

        You know what else increased sales? Refusing, for any reason, to present unless (if a couple) both were there. No matter what they promised.

        In cold calling, leaving hints that the last several people bought, also helps.
        Price up front for me is HUGE. I would without question, call that my best most significant pre qualifier. I throw that number out as fast as I can actually, because of that. If they flinch on the price, I come right back payment options, if there still is a flinch, I am out the door! ( If I stay any longer, SOMEONE is going to PAY! )

        I had a customer not to long ago that was hemming and hawing about the price. I didn't give in an inch. It got to game playing. So I asked If I could make a call real fast. I called this guys biggest competitor. "Is this X Company?" is so and so in? HI X I have an opening this afternoon, would you like to discuss your $X service? I can be there at 3pm. See you then!

        I honestly expected the client I was with, to say something to stop the call. He just stared at me with Deer in headlight eyes. <-- I get this a lot don't I? So I left. He called me 3 days later, He could now afford my services.

        I guess that was killing 2 birds with one stone. Indicating you have made other sales and refusing!
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  • Profile picture of the author misterme
    Originally Posted by jamesfreddyc View Post

    Sounds like you could have avoided all of that with another "Kanigan":

    "No problem, I will send that out right away. Is Friday a good day to follow up with you?

    Great!

    One last thing before I let you go, I am perfectly happy to follow up and discuss this in more detail. All that I ask is at the end of our conversation and I have answered all of your questions, that you give me a definitive "yes" or a "no". The reason why is because in the past when I got a "need to think about it", all I really was getting was a "no" with another waiting period attached to it. So I simply just don't do that anymore.

    So can you commit to that yes or no for me now?"

    Or something like that....I can't remember exactly which post that was from.

    You get your answer right then and there, no waiting and time following up with a poor prospect.
    With all respect to the masterful Kanigan man and to you, thanks but no. I don't like that approach.

    Here's why.

    First of all, I hate saying "great." It's not "great" when someone wants to avail themselves of what I offer. It's "great" for them, but for me it's what I do many times par for the course. I never heard a surgeon exclaim, "great!" when a cardiac patient signs on for an operation or an attorney saying "great!" when an accident victim agrees to legal representation.

    But my main point why I don't like that approach is because: They're stalling. I flushed them out. WHY would I want to keep on talking to them if they're only bs'ing me and then get involved asking them if they'll agree to give me a yes or no when their answer is going to be bull anyway?

    The other thing I don't like about that is in making an admission that OTHERS before them found reason to say "NO" to my offer. WHY would I want to put that thought in their heads?

    Reminds me when I'm being pitched by a salesperson and I'm stalling them and they get into a whole thing just like that and what I do is smile and promise them everything just to get them off the phone - and summarily never bother speaking with them again.

    Originally Posted by ewenmack View Post

    To me, it's a symptom of not giving enough value, intrigue
    up front which can't be compared to anything else
    they have experienced.
    Could be. Could very well be.
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    • Profile picture of the author jamesfreddyc
      Originally Posted by misterme View Post

      The other thing I don't like about that is in making an admission that OTHERS before them found reason to say "NO" to my offer. WHY would I want to put that thought in their heads?
      I was thinking in terms of phone prospecting when reading your post, so perhaps its not a relevant suggestion. With that said and in those terms, I'd go for that to qualify them out with a no right then rather than later.

      That's all.
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  • Profile picture of the author misterme
    Originally Posted by AlexTee View Post

    It's just a weed out question for me….those that say "no" really aren't interested and those that say "yes" and give me their email get logged in as a person to call back in a couple of days but no longer than a week.
    So what you're saying is when they ask to be sent information, you send them your report and then followup within a week. And if their request for information was a smokescreen, if they dodge and stall on your followup with them saying anything like "I haven't gone over what you sent me yet" or saying they can't talk when you call or not returning your calls - - is it then you suspect you're likely dealing with an uninterested party?

    Originally Posted by Claude Whitacre

    But the "At the end, do you agree to tell me Yes or No?" idea, I've tested over a couple of years. I mean real tests, with hundreds of presentations. It doesn't help. my apologies to Jason. But I've never seen it affect the result.
    It can't be seen but those people are crossing their fingers behind their backs when they promise to say yes or no.

    Funny that Jason recommends that because he also says 'buyers are liars' because they're protecting themselves from the big bad salesperson (my words, not Jason's, I'm expressing the gist of the thought here as I understand it). And so the same logic goes towards the potential buyer's agreeing up front to make a decision. They're likely not really committing to honor that agreement, just saying they are because nothing's on the line, yet. Imagine someone asking YOU to agree to make a spot decision. It's almost like an ultimatum.

    Originally Posted by jamesfreddyc

    I was thinking in terms of phone prospecting when reading your post, so perhaps its not a relevant suggestion. With that said and in those terms, I'd go for that to qualify them out with a no right then rather than later.
    Yeah, I got that, thanks. Bottom line is no matter the intent or purpose, it's still saying to the prospect that others just like him have turned down your offer before. So if social proof means anything, it's telling the prospect it's not a good deal. Because it's saying "hey look I'm about to offer you something but you have to agree to make a decision on the spot - and that's because other people like you that I've called about this, they don't go for my offer so they don't immediately agree to going ahead with me, and rather than say so to my face, they give me the run around so many times that now when I call I ask for a commitment up front" - and it would make me wonder why so many others didn't say yes to the offer and that maybe I shouldn't either, and wonder if THAT's the reason you're pushing for an immediate response, for the chance I say yes before I can think it over and perhaps realize it's not a good deal. I think there are other ways to qualify them up front rather than down the road that don't go there.
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    • Profile picture of the author jamesfreddyc
      Originally Posted by misterme View Post

      Yeah, I got that, thanks. Bottom line is no matter the intent or purpose, it's still saying to the prospect that others just like him have turned down your offer before. So if social proof means anything, it's telling the prospect it's not a good deal.....
      Understood and can see how that might be an issue with a prospect's perceptions. But the reality is definitive (and helps to support my persona): I don't expect to close 100% with all of my interactions with people. So what (see my last sentence below).

      I think I'm looking at this in much more simplistic terms (admittedly, at the same time there's a lot going on with this!).... For me, it's just a way to establish a small contract: if I follow up, you will then make a definitive decision. I am also being honest about things (I just don't do "think about it" or "maybe's" any more because I have better prospects that need my time attention right now).

      ....I prefer to be the one to be desired. Not the prospect.

      Also, I see a bit or Oren Klaff's "Frames" going on with this too
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    • Profile picture of the author Jason Kanigan
      Originally Posted by misterme View Post

      So what you're saying is when they ask to be sent information, you send them your report and then followup within a week. And if their request for information was a smokescreen, if they dodge and stall on your followup with them saying anything like "I haven't gone over what you sent me yet" or saying they can't talk when you call or not returning your calls - - is it then you suspect you're likely dealing with an uninterested party?



      It can't be seen but those people are crossing their fingers behind their backs when they promise to say yes or no.

      Funny that Jason recommends that because he also says 'buyers are liars' because they're protecting themselves from the big bad salesperson (my words, not Jason's, I'm expressing the gist of the thought here as I understand it). And so the same logic goes towards the potential buyer's agreeing up front to make a decision. They're likely not really committing to honor that agreement, just saying they are because nothing's on the line, yet. Imagine someone asking YOU to agree to make a spot decision. It's almost like an ultimatum.



      Yeah, I got that, thanks. Bottom line is no matter the intent or purpose, it's still saying to the prospect that others just like him have turned down your offer before. So if social proof means anything, it's telling the prospect it's not a good deal. Because it's saying "hey look I'm about to offer you something but you have to agree to make a decision on the spot - and that's because other people like you that I've called about this, they don't go for my offer so they don't immediately agree to going ahead with me, and rather than say so to my face, they give me the run around so many times that now when I call I ask for a commitment up front" - and it would make me wonder why so many others didn't say yes to the offer and that maybe I shouldn't either, and wonder if THAT's the reason you're pushing for an immediate response, for the chance I say yes before I can think it over and perhaps realize it's not a good deal. I think there are other ways to qualify them up front rather than down the road that don't go there.
      @misterme: I'm not entirely sure what you're referring to, but I'll take a stab at it.

      "Buyers are liars" means if they don't have a level of trust with you, and even when they do, they will withhold key information like a) their true budget, b) how bad the problem really is, c) who the real decision maker is, d) how many other vendors they're talking to, e) the direction they're taking their business in (this week?), and a whole lot more.

      When we put into place a strong up front contract, which has the format "If I do this will you do that", we are getting agreement. They don't usually lie about things in this context. The lies or hiding of facts comes when the sales person doesn't ask questions, avoids the tough issues, or doesn't use up front contracts. Leaving things wishy-washy leads to Mutual Mystification/Collective Confusion, where each side believes they understand what the other wants and thinks. But they're wrong.

      Example: if I don't set an up front contract about how long it will take you to read my brochure and be able to talk again with me about it, when will that talk happen? If I leave it at, "I'll send this to you, then," is that effective? The prospect can say, "Sure, send it to me," and have no intention of ever reading it or speaking with me again. But if I say, "So, if I send this to you, how long do you think it'll take you to read it, and when can we book a quick talk to see if it's something for you or not?", NOW I have something when they agree to speak with me again in a week.

      If the prospect fails to appear at the time and doesn't have a good reason, well, now I know something about that prospect, don't I. Probably not a fit. Now I know not to waste my time pursuing it further. I can move on to other prospects.
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    • Profile picture of the author AlexTee
      …..if their request for information was a smokescreen...……if they dodge and stall on your followup

      I don't invest that much emotion into the responses of every person I talk to when I'm prospecting.

      I'm not trying to figure out if it's a smokescreen or if they are stalling or dodging me.

      I'm dialing for dollars so I just keep it moving.

      If they take my call when following up and haven't gone over the material… I will try to close them on a 10 minute general interest meeting.

      If there is no interest, no problem…I'm moving on to the next call.

      If they really are interested and are truly busy (haven't gone over the material) yet they take my call on a followup, I let them know I will only call back one more time…IF THEY ARE INTERESTED.

      I will leave a message reminding them that I called back per our conversation and how they can reach me and that's the end of it.

      I leave the message so they know I'm the type of sales professional that does what he says.

      I don't concern myself with prospects that don't call back because I'm constantly moving forward making calls until I meet my goals.

      I know I will find prospects that are interested so I dial until I do.
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      • Profile picture of the author misterme
        Originally Posted by Jason Kanigan View Post

        @misterme: I'm not entirely sure what you're referring to...
        "Buyers are liars" means...
        Example: if I don't set an up front contract...
        if I say, "So, if I send this to you, how long do you think it'll take you to read it, and when can we book a quick talk to see if it's something for you or not?", NOW I have something when they agree to speak with me again in a week.

        If the prospect fails to appear at the time and doesn't have a good reason, well, now I know something about that prospect, don't I. Probably not a fit. Now I know not to waste my time pursuing it further. I can move on to other prospects.
        OK, got it. So you're saying the buyer can still turn out to have been a "liar" even when they're going along with your up front agreement.

        And that's what I meant. That you knowing people could be lying when they agree to the up front agreement.

        Originally Posted by AlexTee View Post

        I don't invest that much emotion into the responses of every person I talk to when I'm prospecting.

        I'm not trying to figure out if it's a smokescreen or if they are stalling or dodging me.

        I'm dialing for dollars so I just keep it moving.

        If they take my call when following up and haven't gone over the material... I will try to close them on a 10 minute general interest meeting.

        If there is no interest, no problem...I'm moving on to the next call.
        OK, got that too. Thanks.

        I guess what I'm saying about the idea of sending info and following up to see if there's interest, and having that take a week or so between the initial call and followup call, is that I what I sent them was designed to flush them out a.s.a.p. as to whether they were in or out, to shorten the cycle, mainly because I wasn't going to invest, surely not any emotions, but my time. Because I didn't have the luxury of waiting a week. I had to go to press.

        So here's a question if you don't mind I pick all your brains: If at the initial call they're really just stalling, but you don't know if they are, in your opinions would it be less or more effective, profitable or productive to do something which then has them reveal their hand at that point, instead of a week later?
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        • Profile picture of the author bizgrower
          Originally Posted by misterme View Post

          So here's a question if you don't mind I pick all your brains: If at the initial call they're really just stalling, but you don't know if they are, in your opinions would it be less or more effective, profitable or productive to do something which then has them reveal their hand at that point, instead of a week later?
          To me, this depends upon the nature of the call and how the call went.
          Were you trying to close or get an appointment?
          Can you put in a sense of urgency?

          Then, of course, keep the prospect volume up so it may not matter so much if you
          (actually, I suspect the people you are training) know now or a week from now.

          ---------------------------

          At OP:

          "I could. What things do you want to know more about?"
          Vague, it's a blow off.
          If they have some thing, then you can have better talk
          or know what to address. Is it your credibility?
          IS it how thing will look? Do they want pricing?
          Do they really have schedule or budgeting timing issues?


          Dan
          Signature

          "If you think you're the smartest person in the room, then you're probably in the wrong room."

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        • Profile picture of the author jamesfreddyc
          Originally Posted by misterme View Post

          So here's a question if you don't mind I pick all your brains: If at the initial call they're really just stalling, but you don't know if they are, in your opinions would it be less or more effective, profitable or productive to do something which then has them reveal their hand at that point, instead of a week later?
          For my niche and price points I go for the no most of the time, but that may be different in your case (perhaps if there's a few more zeros on the line). Really, that's what my OP was suggesting is all too, except you approach it by way of that little contract to commit them to a definitive yes or no at the end of any follow-up conversation.
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      • Profile picture of the author Claude Whitacre
        Originally Posted by AlexTee View Post

        [COLOR=Red][I][B]
        If they really are interested and are truly busy (haven't gone over the material) yet they take my call on a followup, I let them know I will only call back one more time...IF THEY ARE INTERESTED.

        I will leave a message reminding them that I called back per our conversation and how they can reach me and that's the end of it.

        I leave the message so they know I'm the type of sales professional that does what he says.
        Alex; Could you tell me about how many people, that you follow up with, buy?
        And the part that's bolded...after you leave the message, how many call back and become a client? Thank you for an informative post.
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  • Profile picture of the author kenmichaels
    buyers are liars only means one thing over here

    It is a mantra we have. It just means people have more money then they say they do.

    Is that always true.No
    But it is true enough
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