A Market That Is Far More Likely To Buy Your Online Services by Claude Whitacre

8 replies
Ask yourself this question...
What Do Business Owners Buy Before They Buy Your Service?

I don’t know precisely what you sell. But this will probably apply to what you sell if you just think about it. I honestly don’t remember when I learned this, or figured it out on my own. But it’s a powerful question to ask yourself.

What is something that business owners tend to buy before they buy your offer?

I can give you the real life examples from my businesses.
When I was selling vacuum cleaners in people’s homes, I noticed that the people who had just bought new carpet were easier to sell than people with older carpet, or bare floors. Why?
Because they had invested more in their carpet than in my vacuum cleaner. And my vacuum cleaner would protect their investment in their new carpet. The new vacuum cleaner would get rid of the sand and grit that cut carpet fibers, when you walked on the carpet. Also, it kept the carpet fibers standing straight up, making the carpet look nicer.

Soooo

I went to a few of the larger carpet dealers, and asked them for the names of the people that had bought carpet in the last few months. Why would they give me those names? First, because I was bragging up the quality of the carpet they bought, and word got back to the dealers, and they wanted me to see more of their customers to help promote their stores. The other reason was that I gave each store a free vacuum cleaner, and free service.

I didn’t tell customers that I was from the carpet store, or that we had anything to do with each other. I tell you now, that it would have been smarter to make that arrangement.

But I was calling people that I knew had new, high quality carpet in their home. I also knew that they could afford my new vacuum cleaner, or at least qualify for financing. And it was such a natural thing to say to them, “You just bought new carpet for your home. If you were ever going to take care of it, and keep it clean, when would be the best time to start?”

And usually, they would say “As soon as possible”. It was a natural sale, and my closing percentage on these sales was better than 80%. And that was essentially a cold call.

I knew that these leads were already super qualified, and hay already had a reason to buy from me. So I gave them a great gift for letting me show them my vacuum cleaner. It wasn’t for buying, just taking a look.

When I‘m selling my local online marketing service to brick and mortar businesses, I also think of “What do they buy before they buy my thing?”

And you know what it is? Print advertising. The business owners who buy lots of local radio, cable TV, and print advertising are far more likely to buy my online marketing service. Why?
Because they re used to buying lots of advertising. And every ad that they run, can point to my online marketing. Their newspaper ad can direct the customer to a website I built for the business. The people seeing the ads can be directed to videos I produce for the business. It all fits together nicely. I don’t give gifts for these appointments. But when I get a newspaper in the mail, or a direct mail ad from a merchant...They are getting a call from me.

The approach I use?

“Hi, Bob? This is Claude Whitacre. I’m looking at your ad right now for mattresses. It’s a fine ad. But it’s missing two things that could make it at least twice as profitable. Would you like to know how to do that? (Yes). Good. I create quality leads and sales for businesses that already advertise in the newspaper (or wherever I saw the ad).I’ll show you haow to make your current advertising less expensive and far more productive. All I ask is that you’ll keep me in mind, if you ever need any of my online services. Fair enough? (Sure, I guess. Can you tell me now?)
Bob, I want to meet with you for a moment, to show you the ad, and point out how to make it more profitable. Will you be in tomorrow between 2 and 3PM?”.

And one out of three times, maybe a tad more, they say “Yes” to the appointment. And almost always, they buy my service. Why? Because they are already buying just about every other thing that advertises for them. Want to sell fish? Find someone who eats a ton of fish. Stop trying to convince a vegetarian to eat fish.

Now, here is your exercise for today; Think of at least two things, that business owners buy, that makes them more likely to buy your product. It should be something that costs more than your product, to make your sale easier.

By the way, the "Two things that would make their ad far more profitable"?


Well, the first thing is to write a much more powerful headline. That's always easy. and then..
A phone number to a 24 hour Toll Free Consumer Helpline, and a link to their home page of their website I build for them that feature several helpful videos I produce for them.

The helpline is a voicemail box. I record a sales message including any contact information. They can't leave a message, just listen. It directs the customer to call the store for sale information. The message can be any length.

There are lots of services like this offered online.

Added later; And something I say to them; "If you were ever going to make your print ads really pay, when would be the best time to start?"
#buy #claude #market #online #services #whitacre
  • Profile picture of the author midasman09
    Banned
    Terrific stuff Claude! I just grabbed our local "Coupon Catalog" and discovered that only 2 coupons had a reference to "Phoning a Recorded Message for "Tips" and the other had a link to a YT Video (which I thought could be improved)

    So....guess who I'm going to contact about having me create Promo Videos for them.

    Seems like the Ad Sales people for these coupon mailers are the same as the Phone-Book Ad Sellers.....just get the Ad.


    Don Alm....sales & marketing guy
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  • Awesome advice Claude. I can imagine how thinking this way would also help me with copywriting.
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  • Profile picture of the author popstocks
    Banned
    Yes. Fishing in the pond with the big fish really does help.
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  • Profile picture of the author Rearden
    I tell my agents, when selling burial insurance, you are not looking to convert an atheist to a Christian, but are looking to convert a Catholic to a Protestant.

    IE -- I am looking for buyers or believers in life insurance. They are the best to sell more to! Because they already have an existing bank account to draft off of, they keep their bills up, and you don't have to convince them that death is expensive (they already get that -- otherwise, they wouldn't own life insurance).

    So, I am always looking for "my guy" who has bought into the concept already -- 75% of the time, they already have bought life insurance, other times they have "bought" into the need for it after seeing a loved one die.

    That way the salesmanship is based on why my solution is the best out of the pack, instead of selling Why You Need Life Insurance 101.
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    David Duford -- Providing On-Going, Personalized Mentorship And Training From A Real Final Expense Producer To Agents New To The Final Expense Life Insurance Business.
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  • Profile picture of the author maxrezn
    Tip: If a businesses frequents trade shows, they can most likely afford & benefit from your services.
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    • Profile picture of the author Claude Whitacre
      Originally Posted by maxrezn View Post

      Tip: If a businesses frequents trade shows, they can most likely afford & benefit from your services.
      Yup. They tend to be in the top 5% of the industry. Certainly in the top half.

      When I talk about networking, trade shows are one of the places I'm talking about.

      Like I've said before, Internet Marketers aren't my niche. But if they were, I'd be going to every event, just to work the attendees.

      In fact, at many of these high end events, maybe 20% of the paid attendees are there for the sole purpose to selling to the other 80%.

      If you have half a dozen clients that are Dry Cleaners...it's a no brainer to attend a national Dry Cleaners trade show. Not with a booth, but working in the halls, between events. Or working by talking to everyone with a booth at the event, to sell to them. You have to be smart about it. I've never been kicked out of an event for canvasing the vendors, but that's what I was doing.
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      One Call Closing book https://www.amazon.com/One-Call-Clos...=1527788418&sr

      "Those who know that they are profound strive for clarity. Those who would like to seem profound to the crowd strive for obscurity" Friedrich Nietzsche
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      • Profile picture of the author abbot
        Banned
        Originally Posted by maxrezn View Post

        Tip: If a businesses frequents trade shows, they can most likely afford & benefit from your services.
        Originally Posted by Claude Whitacre View Post

        Yup. They tend to be in the top 5% of the industry. Certainly in the top half.

        When I talk about networking, trade shows are one of the places I'm talking about.

        Like I've said before, Internet Marketers aren't my niche. But if they were, I'd be going to every event, just to work the attendees.

        In fact, at many of these high end events, maybe 20% of the paid attendees are there for the sole purpose to selling to the other 80%.

        If you have half a dozen clients that are Dry Cleaners...it's a no brainer to attend a national Dry Cleaners trade show. Not with a booth, but working in the halls, between events. Or working by talking to everyone with a booth at the event, to sell to them. You have to be smart about it. I've never been kicked out of an event for canvasing the vendors, but that's what I was doing.
        One of my HVAC clients is head of the industry locally. They participate in trade shows once a month on average. They specialize in geothermal heating systems.

        They have been doing this for 15 years with great success. One day the owner and I were talking and he had just got back from one of the shows, he was pretty hyped about the success the show brought. So I asked when the next show was, and if I could tag along. He agreed.

        When I got to the show I was pretty impressed with their setup, as well as their salesmanship. They definitely knew what they were doing.

        Long story shot...

        I'm a notes kind of guy...

        I took notes through the entire show, I watched peoples eyes as soon as they walked in the door. I watched everyone's reactions and tendencies and had a couple findings that sparked an idea.

        1. There was a booth there that had a little tv showing some before and after's and customer testimonials for their product. People that passed by always stopped for 30 seconds or so to watch the video.

        2. My client's sales guys spent more time explaining their product to people and answering their redundant questions. I would go as far as saying they spent 90% of the time repeating themselves and 10% qualifying.

        3. People were attracted to models, of shape and size. They liked the 3D charts and 'samples' laid out on the booths. They definitely checked out any models or graphs before ever laying eyes on pamphlets and brochures, they even ignored the man with the goody bag!

        4. Booths that had little to no pictures, graphs, visuals etc got very little attention. Even though they had larger logos, banners etc.

        After the show I asked the owner for a meeting, said I had some big ideas that would buy him a new Corvette if he took my advice...not offer...ADVICE.

        Went and photoshopped up a quick mockup booth with my ideas. Here are the things I added to their setup...

        1. A model house, with a model geothermal system. Yeah...like a dollhouse type of house, not a picture.
        2. Graphs showing energy savings and projected $ savings by switching to a geothermal system.
        3. The booth attendees wearing true dress shirts and slacks with the company logo on them.
        4. A 42" tv in the center of the booth, right up front.

        Reasoning for the above:

        1. I noted that people liked models, they loved them! It attracted them in and kept them there. It was something different than pamphlets. We purchased a model house from a local woodworker I knew for $50.00 gathered some material for the model geothermal system and played arts and crafts for a couple hours with them to put it together. The model was about 3'x3' that sat to the right of the tv right up front. probably another $60 in material and $120 in labor.

        2. The large charts attracted people from a distance. We made sure that the numbers took up most of the charts, bolding words such as FREE MONEY, OUT WITH THE OLD IN WITH THE NEW, etc... They already had some pretty good content printed up on posters. But we used banners that hung from PVC above the booth. Large 4'x8' banners. 2 of them to be exact. Cost = $400

        3. Everyone there looked the same, I felt like I was at a landscaping tradeshow...I also wanted to see peoples reactions to 5 guys dressed formal standing in front of the booth. I thought it might show some authority perhaps.Not sure how much this cost...

        4. People really liked the booth with the tv. I guess people are lazy and don't want to scan the posters and all the other clutter on the booths, it's easy to watch tv though right?

        Being that I create professional tour videos for businesses, I created them one. Great shots with a glidecam and canon mark iii 5D. Professional quality. Also interviewed 3 current clients of theirs and shot it with the cam. Hired a script writer, hired a professional voiceover. instead of running the video as one we broke the video up into 5 'sections' each lasting 1 minute.lots of details but that doesn't matter. Cost= $6,500 for the video and roughly $500 for the TV.

        Attended the next show with all of my ideas in place, this was a big show. They were pumped and you better believe I was too.

        They took the show over, the booth had 10X the traffic as anyone else in the show.

        Instead of the sales guys answering redundant questions, they were hammering rebuttals and drilling through the leads. We placed the salesman so the viewers had to walk by the model, AND the TV with the custom video playing over and over to even ask the questions, most questions were answered by the time the people hit the salesmen.

        They produced more than twice the DIRECT SALES / CLOSED SALES than they have ever done in their history of a tradeshow. That's minus all the qualified leads they produced.

        All in all they closed a little over $350k that day in geothermal system sales. Which was 120% more than their previous year at that exact tradeshow.

        I rode with them there and on the way back the owner cut me a check for $10,000 on top of what he already paid me for my service, and handed it to me with a huge smile. Told me I was some sort of mastermind. I told him it was simple psychology and marketing.

        Sorry the post was so long, but it backs your statements about how tradeshows produce some serious potential...If you work it right...

        PS: I never found out how many of the warm leads they closed from the show, I wish I knew. :rolleyes:
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  • Profile picture of the author joecarson1
    There have been many people who have made very valuable posts on the Warrior Forum over the last two years. I have tried to acknowledge them all.

    Having said that, there is only one Claude Whitacre!

    I do not know why you take the time to share your insight here, but I can tell you that is has and will continue to make a big difference in my life and in the lives of those around me.

    Thank you sir!
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