Real Estate Agent Landing Pages

by oscarb 23 replies
I'm a copywriter who just landed a couple of real estate clients. One's an investor, the other's an agent.

Real estate's a new niche for me.

They've both asked me to do lead-capture pages for them. In both cases, they tell me they must collect not only email and name but also address, telephone and 3-4 other items in the opt-in. They are list-building, so the conversion follow up is via email first, telephone later.

I've tried to convince them that having so many fields in the form cuts down on the conversion rate. I've offered to do 2-step opt ins, in which they first ask only for a first name and email or even just email - and once they opt in to that, they are directed to a second, more detailed opt-in.

Am I barking up the wrong tree? Should I just give 'em what they want?

The rest of the page--the headlines and subheads--I have that part covered.

It's the opt-in box part that I'm struggling with.
#offline marketing #agent #estate #landing #pages #real
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  • Profile picture of the author RKCastillo
    I think you are absolutely right.

    So many fields will kill your conversion rate.

    What about offering your lead magnet for a name & email and in the follow up ask them do their address so you can send them something special in the mail?
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    • Profile picture of the author DABK
      If you give them what they want, the conversion rates will be low and they will blame you.

      Do you want that?
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      • Profile picture of the author oscarb
        "If you give them what they want, the conversion rates will be low and they will blame you.

        Do you want that?"

        No.
        Other questions?
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        • Profile picture of the author DABK
          So, since you are the expert who'll be blamed for the results, they either hire you to do what you think works or you don't take them on as clients.

          Originally Posted by oscarb View Post

          "If you give them what they want, the conversion rates will be low and they will blame you.

          Do you want that?"

          No.
          Other questions?
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    • Profile picture of the author ADukes81
      Originally Posted by RKCastillo View Post

      I think you are absolutely right.

      So many fields will kill your conversion rate.

      What about offering your lead magnet for a name & email and in the follow up ask them do their address so you can send them something special in the mail?
      I think RK is spot on here. Grab name/email at first and in the AR sequence ask for more (address, phone, etc.)

      I know more forms hurt conversion rates, but aren't more forms a more qualified lead? I know this isn't always the case, but something to think about.

      I ask for more, but make 2-3 fields optional (phone, URL, company size, etc), and sometimes they fill it out, sometimes they don't. Also, check out a plugin called Wordpress Leads, it's free and it pulls some useful data. It's a mini CRM in your Wordpress dashboard. It's pretty cool
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      • Profile picture of the author Jgregory
        Originally Posted by ADukes81 View Post


        I know more forms hurt conversion rates, but aren't more forms a more qualified lead? I know this isn't always the case, but something to think about.

        I ask for more, but make 2-3 fields optional (phone, URL, company size, etc), and sometimes they fill it out, sometimes they don't. Also, check out a plugin called Wordpress Leads, it's free and it pulls some useful data. It's a mini CRM in your Wordpress dashboard. It's pretty cool
        You can take this man's advice to the bank. Not only does he dig down and learn the local marketing processes, he puts them to work with action. He speaks from experience.

        I landed on this thread because I'm trolling through WF doing research today. These RE threads at the moment along with other Lead Gen topics.

        Conversions for online optin forms with lead gen are falling like a rock in last 18 months. And they may be heading for the dustbin of history if it continues.

        Mobile devices are the reason... the small variety especially, such as the 7 inch Samsung and Nexus units. Typing is too cumbersome to bother with filling out long forms for some people. But the real culprit is something else. I sat in on UI testing and its not really the typing so much as it is getting the cursor to land into a form field so they can enter the data.

        We're trying various other methods of lead capture for front-ends where the target audience is weighted with mobile devices, but tried and true email marketing is still the main method of nurturing a lead. Cost effective too. We want forms to work because email marketing just works so well.

        What seems to always work for User Behavior is Tap to Call. Easy to see why. So we are experimenting... live human answers with tested scripts and gets the 3 to 5 main data points to qualify as a lead. Sometimes that becomes a full qualified lead. Other times we get email address and that goes into the AR series for nurturing to full lead status over time. Problem is it is expensive making the eventual lead costs much higher.

        As Mr. Dukes points out, optional form fields are certainly the way to go with traditional lead capture forms.

        I've used color to good effect for Option fields in the past

        Email address field is first in a box with Yellow background and border

        2 more option fields are in a box below in Blue. Label it "VIP Level" not Optional

        Submit Button

        This really increases conversions and you get the optional fields 75% of the time. And what does VIP Level mean... I don't know yet, but split testing shows it to be effective. Everyone want's to be on the A list.

        Nurturing with emails on mobile hasn't been a problem. As long as it is a click for your CTAs inside the email.

        Bottom line for the OP: A qualified lead is the standard. In most cases it's more than a name, email, and phone number for sales people in any industry. Even if the effort and the cost go up for lead gen, you still have to meet the standard to sell the clients. So optional fields on first form is one way. I think you will find nurturing to get more data points is more effective in the long run. If you fill your funnel with only an email address, you have plenty of time with an AR series to ask for incremental data until you have a completely qualified lead. Then take that to the clients.

        Regards,
        Jan Gregory
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        • Profile picture of the author savidge4
          Originally Posted by Jgregory View Post

          You can take this man's advice to the bank. Not only does he dig down and learn the local marketing processes, he puts them to work with action. He speaks from experience.

          I landed on this thread because I'm trolling through WF doing research today. These RE threads at the moment along with other Lead Gen topics.

          Conversions for online optin forms with lead gen are falling like a rock in last 18 months. And they may be heading for the dustbin of history if it continues.

          Mobile devices are the reason... the small variety especially, such as the 7 inch Samsung and Nexus units. Typing is too cumbersome to bother with filling out long forms for some people. But the real culprit is something else. I sat in on UI testing and its not really the typing so much as it is getting the cursor to land into a form field so they can enter the data.

          We're trying various other methods of lead capture for front-ends where the target audience is weighted with mobile devices, but tried and true email marketing is still the main method of nurturing a lead. Cost effective too. We want forms to work because email marketing just works so well.

          What seems to always work for User Behavior is Tap to Call. Easy to see why. So we are experimenting... live human answers with tested scripts and gets the 3 to 5 main data points to qualify as a lead. Sometimes that becomes a full qualified lead. Other times we get email address and that goes into the AR series for nurturing to full lead status over time. Problem is it is expensive making the eventual lead costs much higher.

          As Mr. Dukes points out, optional form fields are certainly the way to go with traditional lead capture forms.

          I've used color to good effect for Option fields in the past

          Email address field is first in a box with Yellow background and border

          2 more option fields are in a box below in Blue. Label it "VIP Level" not Optional

          Submit Button

          This really increases conversions and you get the optional fields 75% of the time. And what does VIP Level mean... I don't know yet, but split testing shows it to be effective. Everyone want's to be on the A list.

          Nurturing with emails on mobile hasn't been a problem. As long as it is a click for your CTAs inside the email.

          Bottom line for the OP: A qualified lead is the standard. In most cases it's more than a name, email, and phone number for sales people in any industry. Even if the effort and the cost go up for lead gen, you still have to meet the standard to sell the clients. So optional fields on first form is one way. I think you will find nurturing to get more data points is more effective in the long run. If you fill your funnel with only an email address, you have plenty of time with an AR series to ask for incremental data until you have a completely qualified lead. Then take that to the clients.

          Regards,
          Jan Gregory
          As a programmer, I deal with the issues you have stated on a daily basis. Working in a world of web design and figuring out how to optimize conversion now over multiple platforms have made things interesting to say the least. There are many plausible answers to these questions.

          I for one have made the switch ( not that I ever did much of this ) from 'Optimizing' desktop sites for mobile viewing. It simply does not translate well in the transition. Navigation is complicated, form functions are complicated, and the general viewing screen and having to use a slider does not make for a great or even good viewing experience for the mobile user.

          Dedicated mobile design is truly the answer to all of this. I personally do not charge to do this, other than a monthly charge. ( I bury the cost in the desktop version ) Weather your and or my customers understand it or not this is becoming the standard. And as a designer myself that looks to performance as a selling point, I want my work firing at all points.

          Many of the issues that were brought up in this post in particular are made easier using this technology. Mobile site programming and its tools are designed to do just that. The spacing is right between form fields, Navigation is WAY easier, and there is no horizontal screen sliding. Not to mentions the added features of press dialing, map navigation to your clients set location amongst many other things.

          We as marketers have to understand that mobile web access is more prominent than we want to think. I have more than a few sites in my portfolio that the mobile site ( Targeting phones and not tablets ) out performs the desktop site.

          Here is a link to the software I use most of the time to create mobile sites. there is a free 30 day trail, play around with it. The full version is only $49 a year. and its even easier than WordPress to learn!

          https://mosaic.netobjects.com/ <-- is not an affiliate link, however I am an affiliate. I only sell what I use, and this would be one of those.
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          • Profile picture of the author Jgregory
            Originally Posted by savidge4 View Post

            We as marketers have to understand that mobile web access is more prominent than we want to think. I have more than a few sites in my portfolio that the mobile site ( Targeting phones and not tablets ) out performs the desktop site.

            https://mosaic.netobjects.com/ <-- is not an affiliate link, however I am an affiliate. I only sell what I use, and this would be one of those.
            Thanks for that tip on netobjects. And I concur and agree with your assessment on the future of mobile. The differences between the browsers rendering especially make this difficult to think that traditional desktop style design will every work for both sides of the fence.

            Our strategy currently is to use a responsive design based on twitter bootstrap for mixed use domains, quite a few good HTML designs on Themeforest that perform very well on tablets and certainly better on phones than standard website coding, though far from perfect.

            If the project is a straightup lead gen campaign or site then we do use an alternate mobile site for phones that uses a redirect script to sense the mobile phone device and send the visitor to URL for the mobile landing page. And the responsive main landing page suits all tablets just fine

            And that might be the state of the design and the practicality for some time, what you are doing by providiing every client with both desktop and mobile designs to optimize for both target audiences

            There are some keywords that approach 100% mobile phone visitors, and without a mobile design the conversions would drop dramatically.

            I think its coming down to predicting the purpose for the visit... either it's quick and dirty to satisfy an immediate goal... maps, directions, get a phone numbers... or its information seeking and research which requires reading or watching videos for longer periods

            No one has done enough tests yet. But anecdotally, I see a simple borderline of user profiles. Some people only have single purpose goals and the phone becomes their sole device. Some people maintain a phone and a tablet because they know the phone is insufficient when they are digging for info. And some people maintain all three types.

            Business world seems to remain firmly with desktops and laptops, with good reason... so B2B markets are fairly safe from this dilemma for now. It's the consumer markets where its a mystery until you test yourself.

            What are you using for a redirect script? I haven't found one that really satisfies all the different phones out there.

            Thanks for a great post with your information.

            Best Regards
            Jan Gregory
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            • Profile picture of the author savidge4
              Originally Posted by Jgregory View Post

              Thanks for that tip on netobjects. A concur and agree with your assessment on the future of mobile. The differences between the browsers rendering especially make this difficult to think that desktop style design will every work for both sides of the fence.

              Our strategy currently is to use a responsive design based on twitter bootstrap for mixed use domains, quite a few good HTML designs on Themeforest that perform very well on tablets and certainly better on phones though far from perfect.

              If the project is a straightup lead gen campaign or site then we do use an alternate mobile site for phones that uses a redirect script to sense the mobile device and send the visitor to URL for the mobile .

              And that might be the state of the design and the practicality for some time, what you are doing by providiing every client with both desktop and mobile designs to optimize for both target audiences

              There are some keywords that approach 100% mobile phone visitors, and without a mobile design the conversions would drop dramatically.

              I think its coming down to predicting the purpose for the visit... either it's quick and dirty to satisfy an immediate goal... maps, directions, get a phone numbers... or its information seeking and research which requires reading or watching videos for longer periods

              No one has done enough tests yet. But anecdotally, I see a simple borderline of user profiles. Some people only have single purpose goals and the phone becomes their sole device. Some people maintain a phone and a tablet because they know the phone is insufficient when they are digging for info. And some people maintain all three types.

              Business world seems to remain firmly with desktops and laptops, with good reason... so B2B markets are fairly safe from this dilemma for now. It's the consumer markets where its a mystery until you test yourself.

              What are you using for a redirect script? I haven't found one that really satisfies all the different phones out there.

              Thanks for a great post with your information.

              Best Regards
              Jan Gregory
              I use a simple java script, there are a few I have used this one is set for Iphone4 as the minimum

              if ( (screen.width < 960) && (screen.height < 640) ) {
              window.location = 'mobilesite';
              }

              With the recent increase in screen resolution in the last less than a year the one above and below are becoming less effective. The Iphone5 for example at 1136x640 is right in there with desktop resolution. So the need to identify the platform becomes more important.

              This one is screen width minimum

              if (window.screen.width < 1000) {
              window.location = 'm.mysite.com';
              }

              And then the little more complex device detection. ( I am tending to use this more and more due to the pixel count on the new phone screens reaching into desktop resolution) - You can include ( ipad|symbian|palm|windows ce ) in this one as well

              var isMobile = function() { console.log("Navigator: " + navigator.userAgent);
              return /(iphone|ipod|android|blackberry)/i.test(navigator.userAgent);
              };

              You can also click here and get about as robust a redirect as you will ever need http://detectmobilebrowsers.com/ Open source and all. Gotta love the internet huh?

              In terms of predicting use... I am of the belief you HAVE to have both now. there is no choice, you can get all of them or cut yourself / your clients short. Just like using flash anything, its viewing audience is cut 25% right off the bat, from apple users. Do any of us use it anymore? of course we don't, this is falling into the same category with even larger percentages of potential loss.

              With a little reading and testing, you will find with google in particular, that when searches are made from a mobile platform, then it will give that user mobile results first. ( NOT RESPONSIVE ). This is HUGE. And then the question is asked; Why would you not do this for yourself or your customers?

              This is not a fad, this is not the latest cool thing, this is the reality of the industry we work in, this is where we all need to be today, or you are simply falling short, and don't even know it.

              Something I have been doing in the recent 6 months is developing the desktop site to operate around "home.htm" vs. "index.htm" index is of course your primary landing point, this is where I set the mobile script. On my mobile sites I am at top including a link to the "Full sized" site. (in case for what ever reason the script miss directs, and looking at a phone optimized site on a tablet sucks ) So the click back goes to home.htm. and the traffic loops that way leaving out the index.htm so there is no further mobile redirect.

              Hope that Helps!
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              • Profile picture of the author Jgregory
                I'm using this PHP redirect, and its been very effective because it covers most devices. And easy to configure 3 target domains for phones, tablets and desktop users. Well supported with updates so far as open source.

                https://github.com/serbanghita/Mobile-Detect

                I agree with you all you say, however the issue for me as a marketer or publisher is another animal. It's one thing for me say I must have a mobile phone website, its another to figure out how to satisfy that visitor and many varied profiles. What do I put in that very small real estate with many limitations on my traditional CTA methods?

                Aside from design issues and viewport/window size coding being a problem in this major device transition, it's the user/visitor behavior on each device that makes the copywriting and marketing tougher.

                These are still early days for the transition... there are phone users still expecting desktop style navigation and content who could care less about the technology. They are disappointed on any mobile site utnil they realize there are user/human limitations to the size of the screen and the direct UI. Then they often begin wagging their tablet around for this need

                People aren't too satisfied trying to write those long forum posts and comments on a phone.

                As a marketer is not deciding on the shift or a decision to not use Flash... is the problem with HTML5 video behavior. We can't easily add those CTA devices to our video the way we can in MP4 playing in custom flash players on a standard desktop/laptop/tablet browser to the phone website. They see the video okay, but I can't use my call to action methods as I can a desktop

                So mobile phones become a very different landing page conundrum... and the mixture of expectations and capabilities is very difficult to predict in your target audience. Even when together they are searching for the same thing.

                Behaviors, expectations... when we do media buys and PPC its a bit easier to track and modify for each keywords, but as a publisher looking for organic traffic the visitors are all over the map with devices and discerning which "device group" is good potential to monetize the site isn't easy. And can we be certain what each device group really wants when they arrive as a publisher website heavily weighted with lots of content.

                Thing is 99% of my audience begins with a search engine phrase... and if my domains are in the results, lot of visitors can click with expectations suited a desktop environment, but they happen to be using an iPhone. They're likely disappointed even if I redirect them to a super click mobile phone website.

                You mentioned that Google serves up phone mobile content SERPS as a first option... true enough but that isn't universal across all the keyword searches in the index. In my experience, this trend is only on those that Google has data mined and know that the keywords are "commercial intent" keywords. Or because of the visitors geo-location or because of Googles own behavior cookies that build a history. Same for retargeting cookies. Search for some Research type keywords and the SERPS are the same for all devices

                Google makes money with commercial intent keywords, so that's no surprise.
                some day everyone may get a different set of search results! But we're not quite there.

                Mobile phones were the first area where google did this mobile display difference. And it was Adwords streamlined or option-selected by advertisers for mobile only... now they jam it down for all Adwords campaigns. As you say, an optin mobile website for mobile landing pages is mandatory if you are doing adwords.

                Again as a publisher, I'm in a battle to respond to mobile phone limitations on the points of content volume, the video options available for conversion, and the user's invidual behavior profiles. You have to spoon-feed them these days. The threshold for patience is in nano-seconds for some... if the landing page doesn't cause their subconscious Lizard Brain to Shout "Stop, this is IT!" Their clicking on the back button quickly. Why is that a problem? We're down to 4 word headlines in some cases. Limiting compared to the other devices.

                Anyways, I've enjoyed all this nattering about the biggest transition for media in the last 25 years. This shift to mobile along with fracturing of the marketplace into different users on different mobile devices is indeed changing everything. We learn as we go along.

                Best Regards
                Jan Gregory
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        • Profile picture of the author ferriswannabe
          Originally Posted by Jgregory View Post

          ........2 more option fields are in a box below in Blue. Label it "VIP Level" not Optional

          Submit Button

          This really increases conversions.....
          Have tried changing the text on your button from " Submit " to things like

          ' download now" or "get access" or "give it to me" or maybe even like your suggestion " VIP Access"

          The word "Submit" may be give some the feeling that they are giving something up.


          Just a thought. Thanks for all your contributions. You too, savidge4.

          I'm trolling the real estate threads as well.
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  • Profile picture of the author kemdev
    Originally Posted by oscarb View Post

    I'm a copywriter who just landed a couple of real estate clients. One's an investor, the other's an agent.

    Real estate's a new niche for me.

    They've both asked me to do lead-capture pages for them. In both cases, they tell me they must collect not only email and name but also address, telephone and 3-4 other items in the opt-in. They are list-building, so the conversion follow up is via email first, telephone later.

    I've tried to convince them that having so many fields in the form cuts down on the conversion rate. I've offered to do 2-step opt ins, in which they first ask only for a first name and email or even just email - and once they opt in to that, they are directed to a second, more detailed opt-in.

    Am I barking up the wrong tree? Should I just give 'em what they want?

    The rest of the page--the headlines and subheads--I have that part covered.

    It's the opt-in box part that I'm struggling with.
    I think you're looking at this with your "IM" blinders on.

    What you consider a lead is a name and random email address.

    What they consider a lead, as it sounds, is much different. In addition to phone number and address, they probably also want to know their budget, current living situations, how long they've been looking, type of employment, etc... Look at things through your clients eyes. If YOU were selling homes, would you consider a name and email optin a 'lead'? I wouldn't either.

    You're also making the mistake of thinking 'conversion rate' ends at the opt-in. No. Conversation rate ends at the sale. You may get 100% more opt-ins, but your lead quality will be dismal. Bad leads = harder, fewer sales.

    My advice is to listen to what your client is telling you. They know what kind of leads they want.
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    • Profile picture of the author DABK
      Kemdev is right.

      Take a look at lendingtree.com. See how they pay affiliates (they have several types of leads they consider valuable but some are a lot more valuable to them than others).

      The question to ask: is their marketing ready to bring the kind of people to the landing page that will fill in all those fields?

      If it's not, will they say your landing pages are worthless or will they adjust?
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      • Profile picture of the author savidge4
        I have run in to situations like this. The client wants "A" and you KNOW they need "B" I get everything up and running as the client wants it. It doesn't do anything for them of course, I then go in and A/B test their ideas of what they want with the version of what I KNOW to work.

        To get there you say "you need to do "B" to make this work", they will disagree. you then say "that you will do "A", but if the results are poor, can we then implement "B"?" they will almost always agree to these terms.

        There is no sense in making the point and arguing over it. just finding the way to get what you KNOW works best. from that point forward, they will never question you again, and by all means charge them for the change!
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  • Profile picture of the author MrFume
    You should assertively tell them that you will set up the lead capture page according to your own marketing expertise, once the leads have been gathered, they will be expecting to give more details-you can get their other details with a standard form; the quality of the leads will be further filtered by thei process, those not wishing to give their address, telephone e.t.c will be poor quality leads. Whichever way you do it, you will have to further qualify your leads, it is just the nature of lead capture.
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  • Profile picture of the author Peter Lessard
    I suppose this depends on the definition of "landed a couple of real estate clients" is.

    If all they did was hire you to create copy and some landing pages to spec and have no intention of holding you responsible for conversions etc.. then you gave them your opinion and now build them what they want. Maybe they already know and accept conversions won't be great and don't care based on what they are spending and potential upside.

    Let them know that if THEIR idea does not work as well as they had hoped or want to ramp up results later with a second system you would be happy to take on a new job later of building and testing something that does use a different approach.
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  • Profile picture of the author travlinguy
    Originally Posted by oscarb View Post

    I'm a copywriter who just landed a couple of real estate clients. One's an investor, the other's an agent.

    Real estate's a new niche for me.

    They've both asked me to do lead-capture pages for them. In both cases, they tell me they must collect not only email and name but also address, telephone and 3-4 other items in the opt-in. They are list-building, so the conversion follow up is via email first, telephone later.

    I've tried to convince them that having so many fields in the form cuts down on the conversion rate. I've offered to do 2-step opt ins, in which they first ask only for a first name and email or even just email - and once they opt in to that, they are directed to a second, more detailed opt-in.

    Am I barking up the wrong tree? Should I just give 'em what they want?

    The rest of the page--the headlines and subheads--I have that part covered.

    It's the opt-in box part that I'm struggling with.
    I'm disappointed at most of the replies in this thread. The truth is, people will do exactly what you want them to if you make it worth their while. As a copywriter it's up to you to convince your client to do that. We're talking about lead capture here. Real estate agents are already accustomed to paying good money for solid leads.

    So the question comes down to this: What incentive can you offer that will guarantee the subject completes all fields with their actual info? (offering bogus info comes with no reward). Once you've identified the target market (the agent will supply that info) it should be easy to come up with a reward (perhaps a digital reward of some kind that you can pick up for free) that will get the job done.

    The agent gets what s/he wants and you look like a genius with another serious feather in your hat for getting the job done.
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  • Profile picture of the author Skyhawkone
    My two cents

    You could always split test, show the clients less is better.... but put in the info are you buying or selling in the next six months... very important info. I agree, just the email is good, with a follow up campaign, giving info, building trust and then a phone call with info they can either send them or mail them ( but will drop it by). If they are not in the agents area, then a referral fee is the next best thing. People will only leave their info if the offer is compelling, worth leaving their info... make it irresistible, tie it with a 1-800 info line... but catch their info...
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  • Profile picture of the author Matthew Iannotti
    Originally Posted by oscarb View Post

    I'm a copywriter who just landed a couple of real estate clients. One's an investor, the other's an agent.

    Real estate's a new niche for me.

    They've both asked me to do lead-capture pages for them. In both cases, they tell me they must collect not only email and name but also address, telephone and 3-4 other items in the opt-in. They are list-building, so the conversion follow up is via email first, telephone later.

    I've tried to convince them that having so many fields in the form cuts down on the conversion rate. I've offered to do 2-step opt ins, in which they first ask only for a first name and email or even just email - and once they opt in to that, they are directed to a second, more detailed opt-in.

    Am I barking up the wrong tree? Should I just give 'em what they want?

    The rest of the page--the headlines and subheads--I have that part covered.

    It's the opt-in box part that I'm struggling with.
    We use a very long optin and have a high conversion rate. You should test both ways. With a 2 step optin, you should segment the list so they fall into 1 of 2 funnels.

    Sequence 1. They fill out the first step and fail to fill out step 2. These folks get dropped and tagged into list 1. List 1 should have a followup asking them again for this information and perhaps entice them with something for free. That's all up to you how many emails you want to use in this sequence Once they fill out step 2, they're moved over to sequence 2 and continue down whatever path you want, just like the folks in the 2nd sequence.

    Sequence 2. They fill out step 1 and 2 and move forward as needed into whatever direction you want to go.

    Here's an example I put together for you;


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  • Profile picture of the author Rus Sells
    I think you should do what your clients are asking for, they've been in the business for many years and have probably already gone the route you want to take and learned that it's better to get fewer people through the lead funnel that are actually more qualified then to get more people through the lead funnel that aren't qualified.

    Have you taken a moment to ask/learn why the insist on asking for more data?
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  • My first thought when seeing an optin form for just my name and email is that site owner just wants to get me on an email list. If they're asking for more info, as a user, I feel like they're really trying to help me.

    You should also consider that REALTORs are not dummies. They invest a lot of time in learning how to market their business by studying and learning from others in their field. You'd be wise to pay really close attention to what they're telling you. Snagging clients in the real estate game is tough, and you could learn enough from these guys to make yourself a real expert in the niche.

    G'luck.
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  • Profile picture of the author cairnstarheel
    Dude,

    I am in the real estate business. I would do what the client wants first. Then offer a split test on what you are thinking for free.

    But a real estate lead is very valuable to an agent. Worth $1000. But a lot of people enquire and there a lot of time wasters. Also you have to speak with them on the phone. Just producing a bunch of "enquiries" is a waste of time. But a real buyer or seller is important and take some time to nurture and build repore with.

    I would rather deal with only super qualified leads that a bunch of time wasters. "Buyers are lyers. You have to spend time with them, qualify for finance ect.

    Its more than the average 'suggestive sale" on the internet.

    That being said. Can you send me some landing pages and good copy. I am selling investment houses online.

    Cheers,

    Jerry
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    • Profile picture of the author Jason Kanigan
      Originally Posted by cairnstarheel View Post

      Dude,

      I am in the real estate business. I would do what the client wants first. Then offer a split test on what you are thinking for free.

      But a real estate lead is very valuable to an agent. Worth $1000. But a lot of people enquire and there a lot of time wasters. Also you have to speak with them on the phone. Just producing a bunch of "enquiries" is a waste of time. But a real buyer or seller is important and take some time to nurture and build repore with.

      I would rather deal with only super qualified leads that a bunch of time wasters. "Buyers are lyers. You have to spend time with them, qualify for finance ect.

      Its more than the average 'suggestive sale" on the internet.

      That being said. Can you send me some landing pages and good copy. I am selling investment houses online.

      Cheers,

      Jerry
      The client is hiring the internet marketing expert for their expertise.

      The client is not the expert.

      You can easily qualify prospects with the right free report and application form or script for incoming calls.

      And it's "liars" and "rapport".

      That's what you're being paid for, to filter these leads. Not to process easy buyers like making hot dogs. If it were that easy, everyone would do it and you wouldn't make as much commission.

      If you're having trouble with disqualified borrowers and are frustrated, take a look at your sales process. Ask the critical questions up front and find out if they're a poor prospect before you put in a ton of effort.

      Nobody has looked at the posts you've written on in awhile. I think you did a search for "real estate" and are writing whatever you can to get your post count up.
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