9 by 12 EDDM - Offering a gurantee

29 replies
Following Dan Kennedy words, you should be offering a guarantee ... If you are selling ad space. What type of guarantee could you offer ...
#eddm #gurantee #offering
  • Profile picture of the author Eddie Spangler
    The only guarantee you need is that you will guarantee that you actually do what you promise to do, print and mail out x number of cards.
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    Promise Big.
    Deliver Bigger.
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    • Profile picture of the author dominodivine
      Originally Posted by Eddie Spangler View Post

      The only guarantee you need is that you will guarantee that you actually do what you promise to do, print and mail out x number of cards.
      Thanks but what about the promise big and Deliver bigger ... So the promise would be ... to do what is expected of me ... as that is what they paid for ... What would be the deliver bigger ...
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      • Profile picture of the author Eddie Spangler
        Originally Posted by dominodivine View Post

        Thanks but what about the promise big and Deliver bigger ... So the promise would be ... to do what is expected of me ... as that is what they paid for ... What would be the deliver bigger ...
        Really I was just trying to say that no guarantees are needed , you are already giving them the best advertising value of anything available, you already have that "thing that no one else has". So using my words this is the big promise, the best dollar for dollar value on the market.

        The deliver bigger is that it is going to most likely get them results where the umpteen other things they have done have not!!!!!
        Is that not good enough?

        I noticed that you have read Bob Ross's forum so Im kinda surprised that you still seem afraid to make this work in the manner that he prescribed.

        Make the calls or go walking from door to door.
        This is not something to send a letter about, unless of course you plan to follow up with a phone call.
        Time is of the essence when getting this out and you need to sell the spots to get the mailing out in timely fashion, sending a letter and passively waiting for 16 people to call you aint gonna fly.


        Let me add this thought though if you ABSOLUTELY -POSITIVELY
        feel like you have to give a guarantee.

        When you sign them up let them know that you ask for only a 3 month commitment to get the best rate available (obviously structure your pitch with different prices, if you have pitched right they will already feel that the highest price is already a good deal) and then guarantee that if they are not happy with the 1st results then they can cancel the agreement without penalty.
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        Promise Big.
        Deliver Bigger.
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  • Profile picture of the author James English
    Originally Posted by dominodivine View Post

    Following Dan Kennedy words, you should be offering a guarantee ... If you are selling ad space. What type of guarantee could you offer ...
    Be careful with that word! Its hard to offer a guarantee for anything thats out of your control. Like Eddie said, you can guarantee that you will perform the service and mail out a certain amount of mailers. Anything beyond that is out of your control. You can't control how many sales they will get our what their sales abilities even are.
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  • Profile picture of the author Joe Stewart
    One thing that does come to mind is you might say something like this:

    "Unlike most or all of the advertising methods you're using now or have used in the past, I can guarantee you that we'll be able to track exactly how many customers you'll receive from each mailing and how we can improve your conversion rates in the future, so that you can earn even more"! Fair enough? (Then stop talking. Next person who speaks loses.)

    You'd simply add a discount code to their ad so the new customer saves 10%, 20%, etc on their first order. By keeping track of the codes used you'd be able to determine exactly how many customers were generated.

    Next, you can improve their conversion rates in the future by split testing ads. You might try a different headline or a small change to the headline and do a mailing that's equal to the original. Use a unique code for each.

    Once you've determined which one converts best you'll now have a "control" ad to test against. Each time you do a mailing simply test a new ad with one small change and send it to an equal amount of people. Whichever ad gets the most response is the winner again. The winner is your "control". Over time the ads will gradually get better and better.

    Make sense?

    This isn't something I've tried with the 9x12 method. I haven't done that at all, but it's pretty standard marketing tactics to gradually increase your conversion rates.

    HTH
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  • Profile picture of the author Ron Lafuddy
    Does Dan Kennedy sell ad space on a 9 x 12 postcard?

    If not, why would his advice about guarantees, whatever it is, apply to the the person selling this kind of ad space?

    Just curious.
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    • Profile picture of the author dominodivine
      Originally Posted by Ron Lafuddy View Post

      Does Dan Kennedy sell ad space on a 9 x 12 postcard?

      If not, why would his advice about guarantees, whatever it is, apply to the the person selling this kind of ad space?

      Just curious.
      Good questions. well most of my marketing tactics that has worked I learnt from Dan Kennedy ... in addition I was working on a Sales letter vs just doing a bunch of cold calling ...

      So one of the things he recommend regardless of what service/product you selling you should be able to offer a guarantee.

      Basically doing something that no other ad rep is doing
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      • Profile picture of the author Ron Lafuddy
        Thanks for the reply, dominodivine.

        I don't know how far along in the process you are but obviously, you've thought about this some. At this point, what guarantees would you feel comfortable providing?
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        • Profile picture of the author dominodivine
          Originally Posted by Ron Lafuddy View Post

          Thanks for the reply, dominodivine.

          I don't know how far along in the process you are but obviously, you've thought about this some. At this point, what guarantees would you feel comfortable providing?
          I cant guarantee response ... so I am stuck on offering guarantees ...I will just keep plugging at hitting people 1 by 1 with no guarantee.
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          • Profile picture of the author akazo
            Originally Posted by dominodivine View Post

            I cant guarantee response ... so I am stuck on offering guarantees ...I will just keep plugging at hitting people 1 by 1 with no guarantee.
            You cannot guarantee response AND... you cannot guarantee that the business owner will accurately track and report the response!
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          • Profile picture of the author Ron Lafuddy
            Originally Posted by dominodivine View Post

            I cant guarantee response ... so I am stuck on offering guarantees ...I will just keep plugging at hitting people 1 by 1 with no guarantee.
            Okay.

            Could you tell us a little more about your particular ad program?

            How far along are you with it. Do you have a sample and agreements ready to go?

            Have you sold any ads yet?

            What's your schedule for having it completed?
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  • Profile picture of the author AmericanMuscleTA
    I agree with Eddie Spangler. Guarantee what you promise you'll do. No marketer can guarantee a number of responses.
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  • Profile picture of the author FormerWageSlave
    I just started selling spots on a 9x12 a couple weeks ago. My sales skills are a joke, but so far I'm making sales (only have a few spots left to close) and in no uncertain terms, I did not need a guarantee to sell these spots. None. Nada. Zip. Zilch. It's never even come up.

    I tell my clients that there are two factors to the response rate. The first is view rate. How many people actually see your ad? Unlike the Val-Pak, coupon books, or even spots in a magazine or newspaper, you have to hope that your prospect actually turns to the page where your ad is. Then you have to hope they see it and pay attention to it.

    The 9x12 card solves that. Bam. This thing is huge. It's a billboard in your mailbox. They can't help but see it. Blah, blah, we know all that noise.

    The second factor in the response rate is the strength of the offer. If you only offered them 50 cents off an entree, how many would respond? You need to make your offer the best you can afford.

    I'm doing my part, now the business owner has to do theirs. If they don't think they have a good enough offer, then they're probably not right for the card, and they can't afford it. Fine, I'll move on. I don't do the hard sell. Shoot, I can barely soft sell these people!

    There's my 2 cents. I like guarantees. I use one in my consulting business with my clients, but this doesn't need a guarantee.
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    grrr...

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    • Profile picture of the author Joe Stewart
      Originally Posted by FormerWageSlave View Post

      I just started selling spots on a 9x12 a couple weeks ago. My sales skills are a joke, but so far I'm making sales (only have a few spots left to close) and in no uncertain terms, I did not need a guarantee to sell these spots. None. Nada. Zip. Zilch. It's never even come up.

      I tell my clients that there are two factors to the response rate. The first is view rate. How many people actually see your ad? Unlike the Val-Pak, coupon books, or even spots in a magazine or newspaper, you have to hope that your prospect actually turns to the page where your ad is. Then you have to hope they see it and pay attention to it.

      The 9x12 card solves that. Bam. This thing is huge. It's a billboard in your mailbox. They can't help but see it. Blah, blah, we know all that noise.

      The second factor in the response rate is the strength of the offer. If you only offered them 50 cents off an entree, how many would respond? You need to make your offer the best you can afford.

      I'm doing my part, now the business owner has to do theirs. If they don't think they have a good enough offer, then they're probably not right for the card, and they can't afford it. Fine, I'll move on. I don't do the hard sell. Shoot, I can barely soft sell these people!

      There's my 2 cents. I like guarantees. I use one in my consulting business with my clients, but this doesn't need a guarantee.

      Are you going door to door or using the phone?
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      • Profile picture of the author FormerWageSlave
        I'm going door to door. I would be 10x worse on the phone.

        Originally Posted by Joe Stewart View Post

        Are you going door to door or using the phone?
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        grrr...

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        • Profile picture of the author cruisinman
          What size ads do you offer and at what cost per thousand on a 5000 run?

          Originally Posted by FormerWageSlave View Post

          I'm going door to door. I would be 10x worse on the phone.
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          • Profile picture of the author FormerWageSlave
            I answer this in your other thread.

            Originally Posted by cruisinman View Post

            What size ads do you offer and at what cost per thousand on a 5000 run?
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            grrr...

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            • Profile picture of the author DABK
              Like it's been said before, the best guarantee is that no competitor's ad will be on the same post card.

              Dan Kennedy was about reducing/reversing the risk to the buyer.

              So, if you guarantee the above and put a nice penalty on yourself if you fail, the job is done.

              I mean,
              You'll be the only pizzeria on this postcard or else I refund you all your money and give you an extra $250.

              If you were approaching me with something like that, I'd buy, even if your prices were higher than the other dudes/dudettes who're constantly asking me to place ads on their dohickey.
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  • Profile picture of the author Doran Peck
    Look at the big picture. You are offering to get their name directly in front of 5000 or 10,000 sets of eyeballs. 100 percent of those eyeballs belong to decision makers.

    What's more...you are able to achieve all that simultaneously, and at will.

    There is no other medium in existence that can do what direct mail does.

    You are offering exposure...massive exposure.

    Aside from whatever carrot your clients dangle in front of potential customers, there is also the ability to influence...or "nudge" the thinking process of these consumers closer to the eventual sale much faster than had they would have bumbling along on their own.

    So, a good ad not only has an offer, but also educates.

    I have a saying " Never let a customer move at his own pace....motivate him, and do it often....or your competition will do it for you"
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  • Profile picture of the author Neison
    You can offer a guarantee by increasing your involvement with the client. I approach it as an "insurance" upsell.

    "Our standard package is X (what you're already selling).

    "For an additional $Y I will personally work with you to construct an offer that ensures you get a maximum return on your investment.

    "If you're unable to recoup the investment I will gladly offer you a full refund."

    In these situations you just interview them over the phone or in person. Create a better marketing message than the standard stuff they already do. Additional copywriting skills will be required but you can do some research there, if needed.

    In some bizarre cases the promotion might not work out and you have to refund. But if you're able to sell "insurance" with a couple other clients you should at least break even. And you don't have to offer this to everyone - so if they don't have any tracking in place, don't bother, unless you want to help them get that started too.
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    • Profile picture of the author Ron Lafuddy
      Good one, Neison.

      It's an easy up-sell for your premium package, because that's what they really want.

      As you say, pick and choose who you want to work with in this way.

      The great thing about it is, in my experience, they never leave. Even when you raise
      the prices.

      They wouldn't dare.
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    • Profile picture of the author misterme
      Originally Posted by dominodivine View Post

      I cant guarantee response ... so I am stuck on offering guarantees ...I will just keep plugging at hitting people 1 by 1 with no guarantee.
      You're stuck in a love affair with the idea of including a guarantee and trying to find a place for it. You need to become a tough editor and take out all the bits that aren't needed.

      Originally Posted by Steve The Copywriter View Post

      Usually with an agreement that they'll be no competing ads.
      There's all the "guarantee" you need right there. That's the bit they want the most.

      Originally Posted by dominodivine View Post

      Thanks but what about the promise big and Deliver bigger ... So the promise would be ... to do what is expected of me ... as that is what they paid for ... What would be the deliver bigger ...
      Tell them the piece goes out to 5,000 but mail more and then tell them so.

      Originally Posted by Neison View Post

      "For an additional I will personally work with you to construct an offer that ensures you get a maximum return on your investment.

      ...Create a better marketing message than the standard stuff they already do.
      ...And be prepared they'll fight you on what you propose they offer.
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  • I've done a lot of Postcards.

    No one has ever asked for a guarantee but sometimes I do offer one*

    Normally all clients need are reassurances that the distribution volumes and areas will be as stated. And all the cards will be delivered by a certain date. Usually with an agreement that they'll be no competing ads.

    As mentioned by everybody else above - clients realise all the benefits and the extraordinary power of Postcard advertising.

    Clients and me believe no other medium can match it for cost effective, targeted fast results.


    Steve


    P.S. * Once a client asked for a guarantee on extra revenue. A half joked that I would do this for the initial ad rate plus a % of the profits.

    Anyway we struck a deal.

    I did a "solus" Ad on a Postcard. With good copywriting and a truly irresistible offer. We handed them out very close to the store and could see the customers walking in clutching their Postcards. And walking out with carrier bags.

    At closing time the client had the biggest smile and an envelope with a check for the agreed "cut" of the profits.

    Please, only ever do this if you trust the client and have a fail safe system to monitor the results.

    And most importantly the offer really is a great one.
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    • Profile picture of the author Neison
      Steve,

      Can you mention the type of retail store this was?

      Was the offer just a discount or something more?

      Have you continued this relationship? If not, why?

      Thanks


      Originally Posted by Steve The Copywriter View Post

      I did a "solus" Ad on a Postcard. With a truly irresistible offer. We handed them out very close to the store and could see the customers walking in clutching their Postcards. And walking out with carrier bags.
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  • Hi Neison,

    It was a clothing store.

    The "offer" used Steve's secret formula (you've all got to promise never to reveal it)

    Here goes...

    A good discount preferably off everything PLUS something FREE * = A great response.

    And yes, I've done lots more Postcards for the client. Her advertising is now almost exclusively Postcards.


    Steve


    P.S. The FREE thing needs to have some intrinsic or fun value. It can be something from the store.

    Doesn't need to be expensive but people feel it is worth having.

    It could be a "mascot" related to the advertiser (key rings, mugs etc... you name it...)

    It can be a free coffee or a donut.

    Or a home baked biscuit.

    A soft drink if the weather is hot.

    The list is endless and it works a treat.

    Another thing when someone walks in with the Postcard ask the owner to get the name and address of the customer (offer a prize if their name is picked). You can print the owner special "address and contact" cards build into the ad package. Maybe with a tear off slip giving a discount off the customers next purchase.

    They build up a list and can send out promo's.

    And of course you do the copywriting.
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  • Profile picture of the author Jason Kanigan
    If you're not controlling the content of the ads filling the spots your selling, there is no guarantee you can offer besides the non-competition and that you will send the quantity you promise to the locations you say you will.

    Without designing and writing the ads themselves, you have zero control over conversions. And this is a talk you need to have with your prospects before they buy. Otherwise expectations may be wrong. All you are selling is the space on the platform and the delivery method. What happens after that is totally out of your control.

    You can see the opportunity to work with a copywriter and designer here, and make some big upsells. But with more responsibility comes more accountability.
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  • Profile picture of the author FormerWageSlave
    dominodivine - are your prospects asking for a guarantee? if so, what % of prospects have asked for this?

    or do you just feel that you should have one?
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    grrr...

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  • Adding to Jasons comments...it's best not to use a clients ad (unless it's a proven winner) and translates well onto a Postcard.

    Now... often clients love their Ads (particularly if they wrote it).

    Even if the response was low, they rarely if ever see this as their "fault"* - even though the Ad isn't saying anything worth hearing, no offer, bad copy, poor design etc. But they do like seeing their name in print always expecting that everybody else does.

    So don't knock it. just say "It's good but lets make it even better"

    And tell them how you'll do it.


    Steve


    P.S. * Sometimes it wasn't their fault because the ad was written by the newspaper or magazine they advertised in.

    Don't spend ages slagging off other media. Just diplomatically point out all the key points an Ad must have to get a great response. And tell them that's what you'll be doing for them.

    They always appreciate this.

    And makes them very, very keen to book their space.
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    • Profile picture of the author RRG
      "Money back" isn't the only guarantee you can offer.

      Be creative. What can you guarantee?

      And remember that a guarantee's purpose is to reduce, remove or reverse risk and make it easier for the prospect who's already interested -- but maybe on the fence -- to make a buying decision.
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