Listing Prices Online

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I'm in the initial stages of my web design business and I am wondering if it is a good idea to list pricing online. The more I study the competition, the more "it seems" that the higher the quality of design for the site, the more that company does NOT list online pricing. (do not be offended if you do list your prices online, it's simply a recurring observation.) However, listing prices online weeds out individuals who can not afford your services who will therefore not waste your time. Being that I will be using cold calling as one form of marketing I do not know what is the best route. What would you guys recommend?

Thank you in advance.
#listing #online #prices
  • Great question and one I wrestled with back when I first ventured into the offline market selling web design. I found I got the best bang for my buck by listing a "Starting at..." price. This was the bare bones minimum I was willing to work for. The minimum price generally covered the cost of small modifications on a premium theme. My prices started at $750 and I got great clients that often commented on how "affordable" my services were.

    I'd like to add that on a per-hour basis, I made a lot more building these $750 sites than working on a $2,000 site. I also found those projects more fun and relaxed.
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  • Profile picture of the author misterme
    The reason higher priced companies typically don't post prices is simply because there's no advantage to posting price if the price is high. The advantage of posting price comes only when the price is low enough to lure prospects.

    What I'm about to tell you comes from my online experience since 1997.
    Read it through:

    Even posting a "starting at" price has the prospect making a decision based on price. If they think it's a fair price, then while you believe it works in your favor because it weeded out the more price sensitive shopper and gained someone who doesn't object to your fee, what you've actually done is used price as a factor to lure that prospect. That has a consequence.

    In so doing, there's a price sensitivity aspect to that prospect. And it can come out later. Remember: Your good prospect may be someone else's price shopper.

    When you don't post prices however, people have to be attracted by your work, resume, tone, what you can make happen for them, anything other than price. If they're interested enough to inquire it signals they're more likely to value what you can do for them over what the price is (within reason of course).

    So they poke their head inside to ask what you charge. And that's your opportunity to engage in a conversation about value.

    Because price is only an issue and the sole determining factor in the absence of any value.

    Same as window shopping. You spy something you like. You look for a price but there's no tag. Some step inside the store to inquire. Some will walk away.

    Here's what's going on:

    The price sensitive person? If they don't see any price on your website, instead of inquiring, they leave.

    They fear you're expensive.

    It's in their imagination of course because they don't know what your price really is. But in their mind, you must be expensive, whatever they imagine that number to be. But they're price shoppers, so they base their decision on that rather than actually check out the price and find out for sure and then make a decision.

    The other thing which happens when you post price is you lose people who think you're too cheap to be any good.

    Those are the people with deeper pockets looking for someone worthwhile.

    Finally, when you post price, you also lose those who would've become customers, if you had the opportunity to talk with them, sell them on yourself, your services, and then they would've come up with the funds to get your services... but instead they saw a price that was just over their budget a bit - and left. And you never had the chance to speak with them.

    Bottom line: In the above I count two ways you can lose valuable customers by posting prices as opposed to not posting them. And I see how to weed out price shoppers by not posting prices and letting their imagination shoo them away. Though price shoppers tend to inquire anyway even when prices are posted, so you can never be free of them altogether.

    The only issue that remains then is in handling the inquiries asking about price and sorting through them weeding out the undesirables. Some business people can't handle that. It uses up too much of their time and/or gets them frustrated. Of course the solution is to adopt a different attitude about it and knowing how to deftly quickly qualify leads.
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    • Profile picture of the author RichBeck
      Originally Posted by misterme View Post

      The reason higher priced companies typically don't post prices is simply because there's no advantage to posting price if the price is high. The advantage of posting price comes only when the price is low enough to lure prospects.

      What I'm about to tell you comes from my online experience since 1997.
      Read it through:

      Even posting a "starting at" price has the prospect making a decision based on price. If they think it's a fair price, then while you believe it works in your favor because it weeded out the more price sensitive shopper and gained someone who doesn't object to your fee, what you've actually done is used price as a factor to lure that prospect. That has a consequence.

      In so doing, there's a price sensitivity aspect to that prospect. And it can come out later. Remember: Your good prospect may be someone else's price shopper.

      When you don't post prices however, people have to be attracted by your work, resume, tone, what you can make happen for them, anything other than price. If they're interested enough to inquire it signals they're more likely to value what you can do for them over what the price is (within reason of course).

      So they poke their head inside to ask what you charge. And that's your opportunity to engage in a conversation about value.

      Because price is only an issue and the sole determining factor in the absence of any value.

      Same as window shopping. You spy something you like. You look for a price but there's no tag. Some step inside the store to inquire. Some will walk away.

      Here's what's going on:

      The price sensitive person? If they don't see any price on your website, instead of inquiring, they leave.

      They fear you're expensive.

      It's in their imagination of course because they don't know what your price really is. But in their mind, you must be expensive, whatever they imagine that number to be. But they're price shoppers, so they base their decision on that rather than actually check out the price and find out for sure and then make a decision.

      The other thing which happens when you post price is you lose people who think you're too cheap to be any good.

      Those are the people with deeper pockets looking for someone worthwhile.

      Finally, when you post price, you also lose those who would've become customers, if you had the opportunity to talk with them, sell them on yourself, your services, and then they would've come up with the funds to get your services... but instead they saw a price that was just over their budget a bit - and left. And you never had the chance to speak with them.

      Bottom line: In the above I count two ways you can lose valuable customers by posting prices as opposed to not posting them. And I see how to weed out price shoppers by not posting prices and letting their imagination shoo them away. Though price shoppers tend to inquire anyway even when prices are posted, so you can never be free of them altogether.

      The only issue that remains then is in handling the inquiries asking about price and sorting through them weeding out the undesirables. Some business people can't handle that. It uses up too much of their time and/or gets them frustrated. Of course the solution is to adopt a different attitude about it and knowing how to deftly quickly qualify leads.
      misterme,

      Excellent post!

      The biggest "issue" is probably "weeding out the undesirables." I could see how that would get frustrating quickly.

      All The Best,

      Rich Beck BCIP, MCSD, MCIS
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      • Profile picture of the author misterme
        Originally Posted by Kung Fu Backlinks View Post

        Of course, I could argue the other way: in the beginning I spent time talking with people only to lose them on price. Perhaps I wasn't a very good salesperson, or I didn't qualify my prospects well enough, whatever... the fact remains - I wasted my time.

        I found I enjoyed my life a lot more when I just posted a price, thoroughly explained my work, showed a solid portfolio and just took the orders. In fact, I found my closing ratio went way up
        Of course the closing ratio certainly goes up - because you've narrowed the suspects down only to those agreeable to the price.

        But you still lose the two other groups: those who thought your posted price too cheap, thinking something must be wrong with you, and abaondedn your site - and those who would've bought had you the opportunity to speak with them.

        You sacrifice all those leads at the cost of your concern over how you used your time.

        Even though maybe the Messiah himself would've been found among the leads you lost, bringing with him the best referrals, contacts and best opportunities of your career. Maybe even bringing a quantum leap of all opportunities. Gone. All because you only wanted to talk to the ones your price attracted.

        So it becomes a matter of how you efficiently, quickly sort through the incoming requests in a way that doesn't waste your time.

        I am a price-sensitive person myself and can appreciate people who know what they want and just need to find the price that makes sense for them.
        Which is the reason why you do that. And it's why I can say posting prices attracts price sensitive people (even when they're okay with your prices).

        But not all others shop the way you do. And you lose them.

        Originally Posted by RichBeck View Post

        misterme,

        Excellent post!

        The biggest "issue" is probably "weeding out the undesirables." I could see how that would get frustrating quickly.
        Yes, thank you, that's it exactly. And no doubt what leads my friend above to say how he felt his time wasted and feeling his life got better when he didn't have to weed out as many undesirables.

        Without prices to turn people away at the get go (thinking it's either too much or too cheap to be good) the inquiry rate goes up. Some get frustrated taking those calls only to have many of them not pan out. They invest a lot of themselves into those calls. Many times they treat each call from scratch so it's more effort and more work only to have it not pan out by the end of the call.

        That's what they're doing wrong. This should be a few minutes following a template that screens out the wrong people right away so a lot of time and effort ISN'T expended on each call.

        Here's the thing:

        I'd rather be the one who judges whether or not I get to do business with someone rather than let them be the one who decides if they want to even call me based on a dollar amount they saw on my web site.

        Turn them down nicely and you'll even get referrals from people you've turned away - another group of people you'd never have business from if the first person simply abandoned your site after seeing the posted price.

        It means going an extra mile. Some additional effort. Some people aren't willing to do that.

        My business principle is if I only do things within my comfort zone and bias, then as a result I correspondingly limit and confine my results to ONLY that which my comfort zone and bias produces.
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        • Profile picture of the author RichBeck
          Originally Posted by misterme View Post

          Yes, thank you, that's it exactly. And no doubt what leads my friend above to say how he felt his time wasted and feeling his life got better when he didn't have to weed out as many undesirables.

          Without prices to turn people away at the get go (thinking it's either too much or too cheap to be good) the inquiry rate goes up. Some get frustrated taking those calls only to have many of them not pan out. They invest a lot of themselves into those calls. Many times they treat each call from scratch so it's more effort and more work only to have it not pan out by the end of the call.

          That's what they're doing wrong. This should be a few minutes following a template that screens out the wrong people right away so a lot of time and effort ISN'T expended on each call.
          misterme,

          Good points.....

          The most important goes back to Deming...

          "If you can't describe what you are doing as a process, you don't know what you're doing."
          - W. Edwards Deming

          You need to have your sales process nailed down......

          Once you do that, you can "weed out the undesirables" rather quickly.

          The problem is...

          Most people don't.

          All The Best,

          Rich Beck BCIP, MCSD, MCIS
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    • Profile picture of the author Claude Whitacre
      Originally Posted by misterme View Post

      The reason higher priced companies typically don't post prices is simply because there's no advantage to posting price if the price is high. The advantage of posting price comes only when the price is low enough to lure prospects.

      What I'm about to tell you comes from my online experience since 1997.
      Read it through:

      Even posting a "starting at" price has the prospect making a decision based on price. If they think it's a fair price, then while you believe it works in your favor because it weeded out the more price sensitive shopper and gained someone who doesn't object to your fee, what you've actually done is used price as a factor to lure that prospect. That has a consequence.

      In so doing, there's a price sensitivity aspect to that prospect. And it can come out later. Remember: Your good prospect may be someone else's price shopper.

      When you don't post prices however, people have to be attracted by your work, resume, tone, what you can make happen for them, anything other than price. If they're interested enough to inquire it signals they're more likely to value what you can do for them over what the price is (within reason of course).

      So they poke their head inside to ask what you charge. And that's your opportunity to engage in a conversation about value.

      Because price is only an issue and the sole determining factor in the absence of any value.

      Same as window shopping. You spy something you like. You look for a price but there's no tag. Some step inside the store to inquire. Some will walk away.

      Here's what's going on:

      The price sensitive person? If they don't see any price on your website, instead of inquiring, they leave.

      They fear you're expensive.

      It's in their imagination of course because they don't know what your price really is. But in their mind, you must be expensive, whatever they imagine that number to be. But they're price shoppers, so they base their decision on that rather than actually check out the price and find out for sure and then make a decision.

      The other thing which happens when you post price is you lose people who think you're too cheap to be any good.

      Those are the people with deeper pockets looking for someone worthwhile.

      Finally, when you post price, you also lose those who would've become customers, if you had the opportunity to talk with them, sell them on yourself, your services, and then they would've come up with the funds to get your services... but instead they saw a price that was just over their budget a bit - and left. And you never had the chance to speak with them.

      Bottom line: In the above I count two ways you can lose valuable customers by posting prices as opposed to not posting them. And I see how to weed out price shoppers by not posting prices and letting their imagination shoo them away. Though price shoppers tend to inquire anyway even when prices are posted, so you can never be free of them altogether.

      The only issue that remains then is in handling the inquiries asking about price and sorting through them weeding out the undesirables. Some business people can't handle that. It uses up too much of their time and/or gets them frustrated. Of course the solution is to adopt a different attitude about it and knowing how to deftly quickly qualify leads.
      Misterme; Again....incredibly insightful post.

      Personally, I put my price in my website. The only reason is that it's a complex product I sell, and there is nothing to compare it too.

      Now that I've said that, I agree with everything you've said.

      The part that's bolded? In my retail store, we do not have price tags on any of our vacuum cleaners. And here's why. When the price tags have the price, features, etc on them...we get a lot of "I'm just looking" customers who look at 5 or 10 price tags and then walk out. So my store is more like a pharmacy than a drug store. You have to talk to me. You can't learn anything walking around ignoring me. I recently got a new series of models where I hadn't memorized the price yet. So we had large price tags on them. Sure enough, the first day we had several people walk in...look at a few prices, and walk out.

      Ad in 11 years of owning this retail store, I've had exactly two people ask why there were no prices on our vacuums. I'm as surprised as anyone.
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  • Of course, I could argue the other way: in the beginning I spent time talking with people only to lose them on price. Perhaps I wasn't a very good salesperson, or I didn't qualify my prospects well enough, whatever... the fact remains - I wasted my time.

    I found I enjoyed my life a lot more when I just posted a price, thoroughly explained my work, showed a solid portfolio and just took the orders. In fact, I found my closing ratio went way up when shoppers clearly saw I didn't spend a lot of time selling them (I was busy), but rather pointed them to the services that would meet their needs, gave them a firm price and didn't chase them for the sale. Then when I delivered great websites, they were thrilled to hire me for more work and updates.

    There are just as many companies posting prices as those that don't. I don't mind working with price-sensitive people. I am a price-sensitive person myself and can appreciate people who know what they want and just need to find the price that makes sense for them.

    Just my experience. Not saying it should be true for everyone, but just trying to offer my take on the opposite side of the 'debate.'
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  • Profile picture of the author Rus Sells
    I like all the responses here and do agree with the possibility that putting prices online allows one to judge your services and abilities based on the listed pricing however...

    I also think it depends on what you are depicting pricing for as well.

    For example, you could have quick affordable solutions for people needing web sites that are based on some basic templates that you've really designed which clearly defines what they get and if any design work is included etc. etc.

    If after learning more about the client you feel a more customized solution is needed you can up sell them to it easier as they've already given you money. = )

    Just a thought.

    Originally Posted by cosmopolitan View Post

    I'm in the initial stages of my web design business and I am wondering if it is a good idea to list pricing online. The more I study the competition, the more "it seems" that the higher the quality of design for the site, the more that company does NOT list online pricing. (do not be offended if you do list your prices online, it's simply a recurring observation.) However, listing prices online weeds out individuals who can not afford your services who will therefore not waste your time. Being that I will be using cold calling as one form of marketing I do not know what is the best route. What would you guys recommend?

    Thank you in advance.
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  • Good point, Russ. The choice to show prices or not depends a lot on the way your services are done.

    Personally, I think if you're doing actual design, an hourly rate is the only way to go. I've worked in tech and design enough to know that fixed-bid contracts are terrible for the service company unless they have PMs that are REALLY good at fighting scope creep.
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    • Profile picture of the author RichBeck
      Originally Posted by Kung Fu Backlinks View Post

      Good point, Russ. The choice to show prices or not depends a lot on the way your services are done.

      Personally, I think if you're doing actual design, an hourly rate is the only way to go. I've worked in tech and design enough to know that fixed-bid contracts are terrible for the service company unless they have PMs that are REALLY good at fighting scope creep.
      Kung Fu Backlinks,

      It depends....

      Many years ago, I had a friend who only worked on fixed price contracts...

      The catch?

      He delivered exactly what was agreed to for the exact price... with no deviation.

      70% of his clients wanted "additional work." For that, he gladly charged them an hourly fee.

      He also said....

      For that 70%, his average total billing was three times the fixed price.

      All The Best,

      Rich Beck BCIP, MCSD, MCIS
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  • Profile picture of the author Jason Kanigan
    Live by price, die by price.

    Plus, your price should very with the size of the problem.

    Instead of trading hours for dollars, starting asking:

    "Does this prospect have a problem big enough to justify me solving it?"

    If a problem is too small, they can't afford you. And you won't get sucked into doing work for lousy rates.

    Qualify AND Sell at the same time, while making sure you get paid what you're worth!
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    • Originally Posted by Jason Kanigan View Post

      Live by price, die by price.

      Plus, your price should very with the size of the problem.

      Instead of trading hours for dollars, starting asking:

      "Does this prospect have a problem big enough to justify me solving it?"

      If a problem is too small, they can't afford you. And you won't get sucked into doing work for lousy rates.

      Qualify AND Sell at the same time, while making sure you get paid what you're worth!
      Price really isn't the issue - it's profitability.

      making sure you get paid what you're worth!
      "worth" is what your choice market will pay. I always got this without any 'selling' effort. That's my kind of pay day.

      Plus, your price should very with the size of the problem.
      Yup, this can be done with pre-priced packages easily. Depending on the service, etc. of course.
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  • First, let me preface this response by saying I appreciate your point of view, and I'm actually enjoying this discussion. I don't want you to read any sort of argumentative attitude in my response.

    You sacrifice all those leads at the cost of your concern over how you used your time.
    How I used my time directly impacted my profitability Every hour spent fishing through leads making a sale, lowered my per-hour earnings. In my case, it lowered it to such a point that it just wasn't worth it.

    If I spend 3 hours qualifying leads gaining 1 client for whom I spend 10 hours working on a project that pays me $1,000. I just earned about $77 / hour, not $100 / hour.

    Instead, I opted to forward common questions to an FAQ on my site, and didn't invest much time in hashing out details until the prospect was ready to go. Prices were clear and firm, as was the list of types of customization I was willing to do. The time spent hashing out details is common in both scenarios, so I don't see that as a differentiating factor.

    Now, the unknown amount of referrals, etc. I perhaps lost by going this route is indeterminable, so I was forced to ignore it. I got more than enough referral business from what I was doing that I really didn't have to concern myself with other "lost business". And those referrals I did get were cheap since I didn't have to spend much time to get them.

    Yes, I could have lost out on a really fantastic client, but what does that matter if my per-hour earnings are slashed in half to get that client? Further, getting THAT great client takes my time away from getting a different amazing client... there's always an unknown opportunity cost, so it's more practical to deal with the numbers you have right in front of you. I remained profitable by dealing with measurable numbers, not banking on unrealized profit.

    Respectfully, I was profitable after my first client because I set up a system that qualified leads for me rather than putting in any more sweat equity than what it took to set up my company website.

    So it becomes a matter of how you efficiently, quickly sort through the incoming requests in a way that doesn't waste your time.
    Agree completely. And for me, that way was to eliminate pointless conversations about price and value. If a client doesn't see the value in what I do, I don't want them as a client

    Ah, but here is a key piece of info I neglected to mention: I had a system of pre-packaged solutions, and I knew what sort of compensation I wanted for those services. Haggling over price was pointless since I never took on work that deviated from my packages. The headache of coming up with quotes and excessively-custom solutions made no sense for me.

    Now for a true designer / developer that offers very customized solutions (but really, how many different ways are there to build an effective website?), talking to more prospects may make sense. For me... I wanted a system of valuable solutions that were very easy to churn out with minimal effort.
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    • Profile picture of the author misterme
      Originally Posted by Claude Whitacre View Post

      Personally, I put my price in my website. The only reason is that it's a complex product I sell, and there is nothing to compare it too.
      So have you tested not posting its price?

      In my retail store, we do not have price tags on any of our vacuum cleaners. And here's why. When the price tags have the price, features, etc on them...we get a lot of "I'm just looking" customers who look at 5 or 10 price tags and then walk out. So my store is more like a pharmacy than a drug store. You have to talk to me. You can't learn anything walking around ignoring me. I recently got a new series of models where I hadn't memorized the price yet. So we had large price tags on them. Sure enough, the first day we had several people walk in...look at a few prices, and walk out.
      And that's how prices posted on websites work too.

      Originally Posted by Kung Fu Backlinks View Post

      If I spend 3 hours qualifying leads gaining 1 client for whom I spend 10 hours working on a project that pays me $1,000. I just earned about $77 / hour, not $100 / hour.
      Assuming it takes 3 hours sorting through people to find one paying client...

      ...has me wondering several things. One is, at the end of the day, you made 1,000 either way. But one way you capped earnings at 1,000 and cut 3 hours of work screening inquiries - and the other way you could potentially make more if you got at least one more gig out of those three hours of work screening inquiries.

      If the issue is dollars for total hours invested then isn't the better answer to find ways to raise the income rather than cut off the stream of inquiries?

      The other week I probably spent a couple of hours screening inquiries.

      Had a number that got flushed right down the drain. I don't have all the sales numbers from the remaining ones which booked because they're not all completed jobs but so far it's 3500.00 for two.

      Regarding the ones which went down the drain, do I like being on the phone when they start with their woe about budgets? Nope. Do I like dealing with Philistines? Nope. Do I enjoy being the recipient of all their stalls and bull excuses which they think I don't know are stalls and bull excuses? Nope. But as a matter of fact, I encourage them to say no. I want them off my phone fast. I try to see if I can convert them but it's awful easy to see when they're just not going to take.

      I'm probably the only sales person who loves when people say no.

      Even today, another one gives me the "ummm, I don't have my credit card with me" excuse and I told her "oh well then sorry this isn't going to work for you" - and she was stunned. Taken by surprise. But that's another story.

      For me to get to the gold I know I have to drag myself through some mud.

      Because I know this much: If I had my prices listed then I'd make less.

      Isn't that odd how you can make more by listing prices but I'd make less? How can that be, right?

      For example, there's this gig I know for a certainty I wouldn't have gotten because she told me she didn't want to go over $5000. My prices, had they been listed, would've had her leave my website on the spot. Instead, she called me to see what they were.

      That's another reason why my prices aren't online. It gives people the biggest reason of them all to call. "What's your price???"

      Because why give them prices which then encourages people to shop you for other solutions and has them feeling satiated that they have the information they need to make a decision? Nuh uh. I have them wonder what the price is so they call. I see in my hits where they've even googled me with "price" in the search phrase because they're trying to find my prices listed somewhere or mentioned online but they can't find it. They have to speak to me.

      Must've invested a half hour with her. She agreed to $6000. And I booked the job. Like I said, she would've left seeing I was over the $5000 she budgeted.

      That's $1,000 payoff for spending that time on the phone. That's another way of looking at the number of hours invested qualifying people, isn't it?

      You could argue that I made less per hour because of that extended time speaking to her qualifying her - OR - you could argue that I picked up $1,000 more for that half hour of extended effort.

      Actually, it would be more accurate to say I picked up $6,000 because of that additional half hour of effort.

      Then they spent another $7,815 on top of that.

      I opted to forward common questions to an FAQ on my site
      That's smart.

      For me... I wanted a system of valuable solutions that were very easy to churn out with minimal effort.
      Yep. I understand.
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      • Profile picture of the author Claude Whitacre
        Originally Posted by misterme View Post

        So have you tested not posting its price?
        My leads are nearly all from speaking. They already know the price when they go to the website. But I'm getting a few leads from my books now. And they do not know the price until they go to the website.

        My books offer a one hour strategy meeting. And I'm getting calls from that. I may take out the price (out of the website) to see if it increases "strategy session bookings".

        You have to understand that I hate wasting my time with "What can you do for $200?" people, more than I want the money. But...testing is always the answer.

        I'll test it over 30 days to see the difference. It wouldn't be the first time, I had a deeply held position blown away by just testing, and sticking to the math. Thanks for the insights.
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        • Profile picture of the author ewenmack
          For more intangible services the closer you get to demonstrating you
          know the situation your buyer is in, then the more your presented service seems tailor made, therefore can't be price shopped.

          Setting up the right buying environment is more important than a purely test
          to see if price or no price displayed.

          And the right buying setting is to show you know more than anybody else about the situation they are dealing with.

          This confers expertise and passes on authority status to you.

          Best,
          Ewen
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        • Profile picture of the author misterme
          Originally Posted by ewenmack View Post

          For more intangible services the closer you get to demonstrating you
          know the situation your buyer is in, then the more your presented service seems tailor made, therefore can't be price shopped.

          Setting up the right buying environment is more important than a purely test
          to see if price or no price displayed.
          But the big issue about posting prices is that it introduces price as a determining factor at the very onset, way before a foothold may be gained by demonstrating you're the perfect solution, upon which the web visitor decides whether to investigate further or leave.

          Originally Posted by Claude Whitacre View Post

          But I'm getting a few leads from my books now. And they do not know the price until they go to the website.

          My books offer a one hour strategy meeting. And I'm getting calls from that. I may take out the price (out of the website) to see if it increases "strategy session bookings".
          Which it may.

          You have to understand that I hate wasting my time with "What can you do for $200?" people, more than I want the money. But...testing is always the answer.
          I'd start with a preliminary feeler to see where they're at money-wise, to determine whether they'd benefit from the strategy session.

          I already know a good number of my inquiries are going to be low ballers. When I start asking them questions I can tell from their replies if they're going to go cheap. At this point in my career, I can tell from the sound of their voice, actually.
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          • Profile picture of the author ewenmack
            Originally Posted by misterme View Post

            But the big issue about posting prices is that it introduces price as a determining factor at the very onset, way before a foothold may be gained by demonstrating you're the perfect solution, upon which the web visitor decides whether to investigate further or leave.
            True.

            And we haven't taken into consideration as to how much,
            if any, do the page visitors know about one's expertise and point of view
            on the subject.

            If they are landing there cold, it's going to be a bit of a lottery as to
            matching each others service to desires.

            Comparing to having read a series of articles off site, read your book,
            seen you speak before, heard you being interviewed.
            That's indoctrination.

            Best,
            Ewen
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            • Profile picture of the author cosmopolitan
              Thank you all very much. I was after the psychology behind the decision and that is exactly what I was given.
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              • Profile picture of the author misterme
                Originally Posted by cosmopolitan View Post

                Thank you all very much. I was after the psychology behind the decision and that is exactly what I was given.
                To which I'd say, "you're welcome."
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  • In my retail store, we do not have price tags on any of our vacuum cleaners. And here's why. When the price tags have the price, features, etc on them...we get a lot of "I'm just looking" customers who look at 5 or 10 price tags and then walk out. So my store is more like a pharmacy than a drug store. You have to talk to me. You can't learn anything walking around ignoring me. I recently got a new series of models where I hadn't memorized the price yet. So we had large price tags on them. Sure enough, the first day we had several people walk in...look at a few prices, and walk out.
    Good point. The difference between this and perhaps my situation - the time I didn't spend standing in a store, I would spend doing other profitable things. When you have a store with employees that are either standing around or talking to prospects (no option 'C') then you'd definitely want to talk to every warm body that comes in.

    It really does depend on the situation.
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  • Profile picture of the author Rus Sells
    This conversation reminds me of when I was in the remodeling industry.

    Typically when some one was looking for some remodeling work the first thing they look at getting are "estimates".

    I NEVER left estimates because to me an estimate implies I don't really know my job that well.

    The facts were that I knew my trade so well that I could account for all possible problems etc. etc. so that my numbers weren't an estimate at all but instead they were the price to do the job based on the scope or work required and the product the prospect wanted.

    There are conversations here about two different things from what I've read.

    Design services which can be more intangible and services where X is done for X amount of money. It's like comparing Apples to Oranges if you ask me. = )
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    • Profile picture of the author misterme
      Originally Posted by Rus Sells View Post


      There are conversations here about two different things from what I've read.

      Design services which can be more intangible and services where X is done for X amount of money. It's like comparing Apples to Oranges if you ask me. = )
      Perhaps, but not quite. Only because you still need to deal with the way people buy - and that remains the same:

      Whether they're buying something tangible or intangible, they want to know if it's in their price range very typically up front in their buying process.

      Posting or not posting price online is going to affect their shopping behavior in the manner I've pointed out regardless of whether they're shopping for tangibles or intangibles. For example, price shoppers will get spooked over there not being any price stated and fear the service will be expensive, regardless if they're shopping for a design service or one hour of babysitting.
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  • Profile picture of the author amcg
    Originally Posted by cosmopolitan View Post

    I'm in the initial stages of my web design business and I am wondering if it is a good idea to list pricing online. The more I study the competition, the more "it seems" that the higher the quality of design for the site, the more that company does NOT list online pricing. (do not be offended if you do list your prices online, it's simply a recurring observation.) However, listing prices online weeds out individuals who can not afford your services who will therefore not waste your time. Being that I will be using cold calling as one form of marketing I do not know what is the best route. What would you guys recommend?

    Thank you in advance.
    I would say in this instance, don't. Build up your portfolio, via whatever way you can i.e friends, friend of friends and other referrals etc and use them as case studies. If you can get potential clients to enquire first, you're in a better place to cost work.

    This is totally different though if you're selling a product, something that after doing client work for a period, you'll want to get into...
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  • Design services which can be more intangible and services where X is done for X amount of money. It's like comparing Apples to Oranges if you ask me. = )
    Agree completely.
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