How would you market a product like this?

16 replies
Hello Warriors,

Thanks for opening up this thread, I do have a few questions that I would appreciate answers to greatly.

I'm part of a small company that has done the horrid mistake of buying thousands of stock of an item, before even finding a market.

The poor bloke has a poorly designed website and is hesitant on changing it anytime soon, so he has me performing the role of door-to-door inperson selling... though, we are struggling to get this business anywhere via this method.

This business specializes in Glass Whiteboards, a stylish and elegant alternative for corporate businesses and office facilities.
The product is very high quality and easily overcomes our competitors quality, so we are very confident about the product and it's advantages.

Is there any tips that you warriors could provide that would help us get our foot in the door to some places, and hopefully turn a sale?

Thanks again!

Best regards,
Alan
#glass #market #product #strategies #whiteboards
  • Profile picture of the author mrozlat
    Originally Posted by Yui Hirasawa View Post

    Hello Warriors,

    Thanks for opening up this thread, I do have a few questions that I would appreciate answers to greatly.

    I'm part of a small company that has done the horrid mistake of buying thousands of stock of an item, before even finding a market.

    The poor bloke has a poorly designed website and is hesitant on changing it anytime soon, so he has me performing the role of door-to-door inperson selling... though, we are struggling to get this business anywhere via this method.

    This business specializes in Glass Whiteboards, a stylish and elegant alternative for corporate businesses and office facilities.
    The product is very high quality and easily overcomes our competitors quality, so we are very confident about the product and it's advantages.

    Is there any tips that you warriors could provide that would help us get our foot in the door to some places, and hopefully turn a sale?

    Thanks again!

    Best regards,
    Alan
    revere engineer what your competitors are doing... and do it better!
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  • Profile picture of the author jamesfreddyc
    Originally Posted by Yui Hirasawa View Post

    This business specializes in Glass Whiteboards, a stylish and elegant alternative for corporate businesses and office facilities.
    What EXACTLY is a specific niche?

    Corporate business and offices is just too big. You need to really drill down and focus on one particular group, filter out the types of business that simply wouldn't need or desire such a thing.

    Pick one target, call into it, determine who the best decision maker would be, set demos/appointments with them. Don't call into the niche to sell -- call, call, call in order to completely fill up your calendar with demos. Evaluate your performance and then make some decisions after giving it a really good effort (Change up the script? Add some different pain points? Try a different target? etc...)

    Do some searches here in this section for Jason Kanigan, maybe even reach out to him, you will need to put together a phone conversation that is repeatable. Give yourself some time to develop the skill.

    Edit: you need to identify a couple of specific things that your niche struggles with that your product(s) can resolve. Use these issues/problems to help identify good prospects that would have a need and would be interested to take a look --- the phone probably is going to be the most cost-effective and efficient way to do this.
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    • Profile picture of the author JamesW3
      Originally Posted by jamesfreddyc View Post

      What EXACTLY is a specific niche?

      Corporate business and offices is just too big. You need to really drill down and focus on one particular group, filter out the types of business that simply wouldn't need or desire such a thing.

      Pick one target, call into it, determine who the best decision maker would be, set demos/appointments with them. Don't call into the niche to sell -- call, call, call in order to completely fill up your calendar with demos. Evaluate your performance and then make some decisions after giving it a really good effort (Change up the script? Add some different pain points? Try a different target? etc...)

      Do some searches here in this section for Jason Kanigan, maybe even reach out to him, you will need to put together a phone conversation that is repeatable. Give yourself some time to develop the skill.

      Edit: you need to identify a couple of specific things that your niche struggles with that your product(s) can resolve. Use these issues/problems to help identify good prospects that would have a need and would be interested to take a look --- the phone probably is going to be the most cost-effective and efficient way to do this.

      Agreed. Basically you need a business plan and inside of that plan you need developed brand (hopefully you are offering some that is proprietary) and a marketing plan. Both will require research to see if the business is even profitable. Taking action is great but not before you have a plan/strategy/research that insures a decent ROI.
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      • Profile picture of the author jamesfreddyc
        Originally Posted by JamesW3 View Post

        Agreed. Basically you need a business plan and inside of that plan you need developed brand (hopefully you are offering some that is proprietary) and a marketing plan. Both will require research to see if the business is even profitable. Taking action is great but not before you have a plan/strategy/research that insures a decent ROI.
        I tend to view building a brand as more of a journey that is the byproduct of successful sales effort in the marketplace in conjunction with marketing. However, it sounds like the OP needs to generate sales, a different effort from marketing (and with a poor website as mentioned and likely no budget I am guessing) it appears as though some swift and direct sales activities need to happen.

        By no means am I suggesting not to brand along the way --- but that is an ancillary effort I think, or is something that can occur alongside their more immediate need to generate some sales.
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        • Profile picture of the author JamesW3
          Originally Posted by jamesfreddyc View Post

          I tend to view building a brand as more of a journey that is the byproduct of successful sales effort in the marketplace in conjunction with marketing. However, it sounds like the OP needs to generate sales, a different effort from marketing (and with a poor website as mentioned and likely no budget I am guessing) it appears as though some swift and direct sales activities need to happen.

          By no means am I suggesting not to brand along the way --- but that is an ancillary effort I think, or is something that can occur alongside their more immediate need to generate some sales.
          I just wrote post about this..take a look...i will have to write one on the difference between marketing and branding but that almost seems subjective nowadays but i do believe there is a clear distinction

          http://www.warriorforum.com/main-int...ine-brand.html
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  • Profile picture of the author mjbmedia
    What advantages are there to the business to use your glass whiteboard as opposed to what theyd already have in place on their walls and why should they spend £££/$$$ to upgrade to something they probably don't even need to upgrade to?
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    Mike

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    • Profile picture of the author jamesfreddyc
      Originally Posted by mjbmedia View Post

      What advantages are there to the business to use your glass whiteboard as opposed to what theyd already have in place on their walls and why should they spend £££/$$$ to upgrade to something they probably don't even need to upgrade to?
      This is what I was alluding to in my OP as well. Although I was coming from the angle of the problem they solve instead of a benefit/advantage they offer.

      I don't know exactly but perhaps the problem/pain their target niche would be related to having an inferior looking whiteboard in a high-end environment. I'd probably ask for the office manager/coordinator --- they will either have this issue or at minimum have an understanding of it.

      How effective will it be is a completely unknown. But I think its something the OP could use to call into the niche and have SOMETHING to focus on. Perhaps it could be a way to ferret-out additional/other problems that could be related to their product?
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      • Profile picture of the author jimbo13
        Seems like a gimmicky thing to sell.

        Marker pen on a whiteboard = visible, cheap and easy to clean with any old rag.

        Marker pen on glass = not so visible, sounds expensive and need decent cleaning fluid.

        To make the scribbling visible you would have to place the glass board against a white background, it couldn't be free standing.

        Walking around door to door wont help you.

        You need some ultra trendy boutique type of company who thinks things like this are de rigueur.

        Do you have companies like that in Australia?

        London has lots of these types of companies typically in fashion, publishing, Advertising, Media that sort of thing.

        Rest of the UK is more sensible.

        Dan
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  • Profile picture of the author Yui Hirasawa
    Thank you very much everyone,
    I appreciate the responses.

    Some very high quality people here, I'll suggest these ideas to the boss.

    Thanks again!
    - Yui
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    • Profile picture of the author savidge4
      I am going to disagree with most here and suggest you broaden your niche. It really depends on the size of your product, but I might focus more on the residential sales side more. You really can only hit so many Lawyers, real estate agents, engineering firms, and architect firms.


      If anyone has a white board they know with time ( and really not that much time ) they stain.. they carry that reddish tint, but the glass ones do not do that at all ( Sales point ) I use the glass white boards in my office and have 2 or 3 in the house. ( 1 in each kids room, and one in the mud room )

      Check your prices with the likes of Staples and office Max etc. Because that is where the average residential consumer is going to look for one.

      I would even try placing an ad on Craigs list really pushing the "Commercial" grade quality for your use at home. Play up the "we stumbled on a great deal and are passing the savings on to you - limited quantities act now!"

      Hope that Helps!
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      Success is an ACT not an idea
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      • Profile picture of the author savidge4
        After reading over this thread again, I can see no one here has ever used a glass white board. Its one of those things... once you use glass, you will never go back. ALL whiteboards are not created equal!

        when you are doing the door to door sales... Do you have one with you? or at least a piece of one? The splendor of a glass whiteboard is a very visual feely thing.
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        Success is an ACT not an idea
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    • Profile picture of the author mjbmedia
      Originally Posted by Yui Hirasawa View Post

      Thank you very much everyone,
      I appreciate the responses.

      Some very high quality people here, I'll suggest these ideas to the boss.

      Thanks again!
      - Yui
      even better would be to also answer the questions raised
      Signature

      Mike

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  • Profile picture of the author SashaLee
    Hi there,

    Forget about brand building.

    Here's what we would do:

    We would buy bulk quantities of the cheapest whiteboard pens we could find.

    Then we would get on the phone and call every office we could offering them 2 free white board pen sets, at the same time asking them, "You do have a whiteboard, don't you?".

    Whether they do or they don't you now have a reason to go talk to them. If they do, tell them you'll be by tomorrow with their free gift. While there, hawk your glass board.

    You could also accomplish the same thing with direct mail, only more effectively.

    All the best,

    Sasha.
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  • Profile picture of the author Entrecon
    Depending on how well they actually work and the cost, you might be able to sell them to schools. Especially if you can find schools that still have old chalk boards they want to swap out.

    Another idea is to find a partner. Find a company that builds or remodels office buildings and offer to partner with them to have the boards installed as part of the construction.
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  • Profile picture of the author ronrule
    Glass dry erase boards won't stain or show ghost letters, so that's a plus. I actually prefer just using a piece of glass on top of a matte sheet than a traditional whiteboard for that reason. Another bonus, you can use dry erase markers or a marker that needs a cleaner to come off, so you could section off parts of your board to be semi-permanent while having other areas that are more easily erasable. Just the marker selection alone make sit worth it.... dry erase, wet erase, grease pens, glow in the darks (which really pop under a black light), or permanent marker ("permanent" still comes off with cleaner, but not a dry swipe). They look a lot better too.

    They aren't hard to sell once you get people thinking about it the right way. Show a whiteboard that's junky looking with ghosted letters and scuff marks, beside your nice clean glass board - you could also show a progression (After one year, after five years, etc.) as the white board looks worse and worse yours looks great.

    Then you need use scenarios ... the trendy startup office, the stiff boardroom, the bar/restaurant making their daily specials pop with the glow marketers, a classroom, collaboration space in an office, etc.
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  • It's all about how you present what you're selling. I am not talking solely about this product, but think about it for a moment.....if it helps someone and their business, whether it makes them money, gains more customers, organize business, or grows their brand, then you will find that it is worth selling and can be sold. Again, it's all about how you present it and what you do with your product that shows it is worth the time and money to invest in.
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