Direct Mail - Letterhead vs. Non-Letterhead?

12 replies
Hey Everybody,

So I've had some success getting rep mgmt. leads/clients using a two pages sales letter in a regular white envelope (printing the address, personal return label, stamp at 30 degree angle : ). I've upgraded to premium, heavy paper for the actual letters as it looks more legitimate than cheap paper. I'm using a standard biz letter format with a headline under the date.

What I'm wondering is, does using letterhead make sense? I know I should test it, but I'm operating on such a small scale the results wouldn't be statistically significant. In short, I'm not sure if it will tip the reader's hat that I'm sending a sales letter (negative) or make it look more legit versus plain white paper (positive).

Any input from people with experience would be appreciated.

Thx!
#direct #letterhead #mail #nonletterhead
  • Profile picture of the author 8j++
    Just an opinion, wish I could back it up with some documented facts, but I would stick with the traditionalism of a letterhead, but not necessarily at the top of the letter. experiment for visual impact, because sometimes it not what you see, but how the visual ascetics work..
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[9255006].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author AmericanMuscleTA
    I'd stay away from the letterhead if you're prospecting for new clients. You want the prospect to get instant interest in what your letter is about to say.

    If you're sending to current clients then you can use letterhead.

    The only real way to tell is to test, Test, TEST.
    Signature

    David Hunter | Duke of Marketing | Real Estate Agent
    www.DukeOfMarketing.com

    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[9255400].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author Jonwebb
    letter head at the bottom works well in my experience. I don't use letter heads to often though.

    the only thing that matter is leads. Test it out.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[9258930].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author Doran Peck
    You'll get more response with a letterhead. No letterhead just screams scam or noob.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[9259482].message }}
    • Profile picture of the author SashaLee
      Originally Posted by Doran Peck View Post

      You'll get more response with a letterhead. No letterhead just screams scam or noob.
      '

      Hi there,

      I beg to differ.

      We've had exactly the opposite results for a client in a business that's traditionally full of "fly-by-nights".

      In a basic split test of 40,000 pieces with letterhead and 40,000 without, on a three page letter (plain not bond) identical offer, call to action etc the letter without letterhead pulled 20% better on the initial mailing. Subsequent mailings were all without the letterhead.

      No logos, nothing to indicate who may have sent it.

      (Incidentally, our letter signers title was simple "Name, President". )

      Of course, nothing matters except revenue and this particular campaign has been massively successful for our client, and consequently us.

      Now, our hardest task is getting to stick to the plan and not change what's working.

      Mr. Peck has a point, though. If you're trying to establish your mark within a niche you've already targeted it's probably not a bad idea to re-establish yourself within that niche by re-using your logo/brand/whatever.

      All the best,

      Sasha.
      {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[9259763].message }}
      • Profile picture of the author ThomasOMalley
        Originally Posted by SashaLee View Post

        '

        Hi there,

        I beg to differ.

        We've had exactly the opposite results for a client in a business that's traditionally full of "fly-by-nights".

        In a basic split test of 40,000 pieces with letterhead and 40,000 without, on a three page letter (plain not bond) identical offer, call to action etc the letter without letterhead pulled 20% better on the initial mailing. Subsequent mailings were all without the letterhead.

        No logos, nothing to indicate who may have sent it.

        (Incidentally, our letter signers title was simple "Name, President". )

        Of course, nothing matters except revenue and this particular campaign has been massively successful for our client, and consequently us.

        Now, our hardest task is getting to stick to the plan and not change what's working.

        Mr. Peck has a point, though. If you're trying to establish your mark within a niche you've already targeted it's probably not a bad idea to re-establish yourself within that niche by re-using your logo/brand/whatever.

        All the best,

        Sasha.
        Although an actual test is always important, your results don't surprise me.

        You want to grab the attention of the prospect from the start. How do you do that? Of course, you use a headline...not letterhead.
        {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[9259863].message }}
        • Profile picture of the author DABK
          No tests to back this up, but if they know who you are and like you, a letterhead might work for you; if they like and hate you, it will work against you.

          If they don't know you, a headline that speaks to them should be best.

          I'm always thinking in the English speaking world, people read left to right, top to bottom. So, the first thing at the top of a sales letter should be your best hook.
          {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[9262679].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author Steve Solem
    I really cant say from personal experience, but I don't remember ever hearing Dan Kennedy, Joe Sugarman or Gary Halbert etc... ever mention the benefits of using Letterhead for a sales letter.

    I think getting your letter opened and having people read your headline is key, but you'd really have to split test the letterhead thing with enough prospects to see if it makes sense in your situation.

    Cheers,

    Steve
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[9259506].message }}
    • Profile picture of the author Laubster
      Originally Posted by Steve Solem View Post

      I really cant say from personal experience, but I don't remember ever hearing Dan Kennedy, Joe Sugarman or Gary Halbert etc... ever mention the benefits of using Letterhead for a sales letter.

      I think getting your letter opened and having people read your headline is key, but you'd really have to split test the letterhead thing with enough prospects to see if it makes sense in your situation.
      Thanks Steve. Yeah I've never heard them say anything for or against it, so I really wasn't sure. And my sample size is too small to test, so I'll just stick to what I'm doing (no letterhead).
      {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[9262775].message }}
      • Profile picture of the author webbernaut
        Instead of deciding for or against a letterhead, isn't it actually more important what message your letterhead conveys? If it is well drafted and excites the reader to buy in and read on, you better have it. If you fail to write such a letterhead, you might waste your money mailing a letter out at all.

        I'd say, go for a letterhead and make sure its really good.
        {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[9271660].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author karenfisher252
    A letterhead adds authenticity of your email.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[9274354].message }}
    • Profile picture of the author SashaLee
      Originally Posted by karenfisher252 View Post

      A letterhead adds authenticity of your email.
      Hi there,

      He wasn't referring to email.

      All the best,

      Sasha.
      {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[9275399].message }}

Trending Topics