''You're too nice for sales''

47 replies
"You are too nice for sales. I can imagine you would be great at opening the call and building trust but then one of our senior brokers would have to take the call and close..."

Thats what my last interviewer for a entry level broker position told me. I graduate next year and this summer I really want to learn to sell. But the last 3 entry level sales jobs Ive applied for have all ended up with the interviewer judging me as too nice and not pushy enough!?

Im not about to give up, how can I get sales experience? Pick up the phone and cold call with an imaginary product so I can get the hang of rejection?
#nice #sales
  • Profile picture of the author Jason Kanigan
    Steph,

    There are other fields than brokerage houses, right? Keep looking, doing information interviews, and interviewing until you find the right fit. There ARE companies out there who are looking for salespeople who have a different approach from the traditional features and benefits blast, overcoming objections and wrestling with the prospect.

    It took me about a dozen years after graduation to discover it, but there is a different way of selling...in fact, there are several. All I had heard of to that point was traditional selling. And it was never a fit for me. So I went in and out of sales, back and forth from factory management roles.

    Eventually I got mad enough because I didn't know why I got some orders and lost others. And I was supposedly experienced and good at this stuff! That's when I started really looking around, and found consultative selling.

    Go research consultative selling, and see if it's a fit for you. There's no need to be pushy in this style of sales.

    There are plenty of companies out there that will be delighted to hear you are aware of that approach. For them, it will be a huge leg up that you're already familiar with it.
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    • Profile picture of the author StephLee
      Originally Posted by Jason Kanigan View Post

      Steph,

      There are other fields than brokerage houses, right? Keep looking, doing information interviews, and interviewing until you find the right fit. There ARE companies out there who are looking for salespeople who have a different approach from the traditional features and benefits blast, overcoming objections and wrestling with the prospect.

      It took me about a dozen years after graduation to discover it, but there is a different way of selling...in fact, there are several. All I had heard of to that point was traditional selling. And it was never a fit for me. So I went in and out of sales, back and forth from factory management roles.

      Eventually I got mad enough because I didn't know why I got some orders and lost others. And I was supposedly experienced and good at this stuff! That's when I started really looking around, and found consultative selling.

      Go research consultative selling, and see if it's a fit for you. There's no need to be pushy in this style of sales.

      There are plenty of companies out there that will be delighted to hear you are aware of that approach. For them, it will be a huge leg up that you're already familiar with it.
      Thanks Jason, I just feel a tough sales environment would help me grow. Because I'm actually a pushover in social situations and personal relationships. Being told I'm nice is nothing new, but it's only recently I've stopped taking it as a compliment and seen it as neediness and approval seeking seeping through.

      Before this broker interview, I was given a 2 day trial selling laser toner cartridges over the phone. I started with 5 other people and we all called businesses in the morning, posing as people from Hewlett Packard wanting to confirm manager name and number. Then I'd call them back in the afternoon as myself from this company.

      The first hurdle I overcame was getting past the receptionist. I kept on giving long winded answers to why I was calling and then my trainer stepped in and said ''When they ask you what the call is about... just bloody say ''Mr Smith will know, thanks' and pause.

      Next, I struggled getting the person on the line to go answer questions about their printer like model number and size of cartridges. I'm struggling to explain why I need the model number to go ahead with the call and my trainer pulls up a seat next to me and with the person on the line able to hear everything says ''Tell that whoring slab of minimum wage KFC to get up off her seat and turn her printer around and read you the freaking number, stop listening so much and start giving instructions''

      That was a proper culture shock to me. I've never been like that in my life, and a guilty confession is that I actually enjoyed trying to be a bit bullish on the phone. I don't know how to explain it, and even though I was seriously exhausted at the end of the day, I was thirsty to go back the next day. But I clearly sucked because I only got through to the end of the script about 8 times the next day and couldn't deal with the reasons why they couldn't by. My trainer said I was too nice and needed to be a bitch, and that my face showed I was getting frustrated by rejection and he couldn't see me doing well. Bye bye.

      I'm just thinking if I should go and find a consultative selling job or keep trying in a tougher environment to thicken my skin
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      • Profile picture of the author jimbo13
        Originally Posted by StephLee View Post

        I was given a 2 day trial selling laser toner cartridges over the phone. I started with 5 other people and we all called businesses in the morning, posing as people from Hewlett Packard wanting to confirm manager name and number. Then I'd call them back in the afternoon as myself from this company.

        The first hurdle I overcame was getting past the receptionist. I kept on giving long winded answers to why I was calling and then my trainer stepped in and said ''When they ask you what the call is about... just bloody say ''Mr Smith will know, thanks' and pause.

        Next, I struggled getting the person on the line to go answer questions about their printer like model number and size of cartridges. I'm struggling to explain why I need the model number to go ahead with the call and my trainer pulls up a seat next to me and with the person on the line able to hear everything says ''Tell that whoring slab of minimum wage KFC to get up off her seat and turn her printer around and read you the freaking number, stop listening so much and start giving instructions''
        Just say 'I don't want to work for a lying, condescending c*** like you' and see how nice he thinks you are then.

        Then go and get a job at Oracle or Microsoft or somewhere they don't think like this about other people.

        I met someone in sales once who believed, and I quote, 'Customers exist to be financially raped.'

        Great.

        Dan
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      • Profile picture of the author joe golfer
        Originally Posted by StephLee View Post

        Thanks Jason, I just feel a tough sales environment would help me grow. Because I'm actually a pushover in social situations and personal relationships. Being told I'm nice is nothing new, but it's only recently I've stopped taking it as a compliment and seen it as neediness and approval seeking seeping through.

        Before this broker interview, I was given a 2 day trial selling laser toner cartridges over the phone. I started with 5 other people and we all called businesses in the morning, posing as people from Hewlett Packard wanting to confirm manager name and number. Then I'd call them back in the afternoon as myself from this company.

        The first hurdle I overcame was getting past the receptionist. I kept on giving long winded answers to why I was calling and then my trainer stepped in and said ''When they ask you what the call is about... just bloody say ''Mr Smith will know, thanks' and pause.

        Next, I struggled getting the person on the line to go answer questions about their printer like model number and size of cartridges. I'm struggling to explain why I need the model number to go ahead with the call and my trainer pulls up a seat next to me and with the person on the line able to hear everything says ''Tell that whoring slab of minimum wage KFC to get up off her seat and turn her printer around and read you the freaking number, stop listening so much and start giving instructions''

        That was a proper culture shock to me. I've never been like that in my life, and a guilty confession is that I actually enjoyed trying to be a bit bullish on the phone. I don't know how to explain it, and even though I was seriously exhausted at the end of the day, I was thirsty to go back the next day. But I clearly sucked because I only got through to the end of the script about 8 times the next day and couldn't deal with the reasons why they couldn't by. My trainer said I was too nice and needed to be a bitch, and that my face showed I was getting frustrated by rejection and he couldn't see me doing well. Bye bye.

        I'm just thinking if I should go and find a consultative selling job or keep trying in a tougher environment to thicken my skin
        Run from these jokers before they taint you with their stink. Toner cartridges? Pretend you are from HP? What is this? TonerAndFraud.com?

        These momma's boys can't sell diddly. I can find you 10 good sales jobs TODAY for professional companies that will lead to solid income and a real career. Take a shower with bleach and start over. Even working for ReachLocal would be better.

        You don't need to commit fraud for shysters to "toughen up." EVERY sales job teaches you to be tough. NOBODY is meeting their quarterly numbers without serious hustle. This ain't the Reagan years. Times are tough. You don't need to add to the stress by working for flea-infested dirtbag wannabes who couldn't sell a bucket of water to somebody with their pants on fire.
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  • Profile picture of the author socialentry
    Then just be pushy.

    If you have things like sports or things like ROTC, emphasize that.

    One thing that brokerage houses respect are people who want it bad, that's part of the culture. That's why it's one of the only industry where it's not only socially acceptable but almost expected to cold call for a job.
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    • Profile picture of the author StephLee
      Originally Posted by socialentry View Post

      Then just be pushy.

      If you have things like sports or things like ROTC, emphasize that.

      One thing that brokerage houses respect are people who want it bad, that's part of the culture. That's why it's one of the only industry where it's not only socially acceptable but almost expected to cold call for a job.
      I see the need to be pushy when the time is right, but I've found it's quite hard for me to do in the real world. I need to push past my beliefs.

      Sorry, what do you mean by ROTC? Google gives me Reserve officers training corps
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  • Profile picture of the author Johnny Mathis
    Socialentry is right . To help toughen you up Just watch the movie Bolier Room and become Seth ,he seemed liked a nice guy too until he start making big money from being competitive.
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  • Profile picture of the author Claude Whitacre
    Originally Posted by StephLee View Post

    "You are too nice for sales. I can imagine you would be great at opening the call and building trust but then one of our senior brokers would have to take the call and close..."

    Thats what my last interviewer for a entry level broker position told me. I graduate next year and this summer I really want to learn to sell. But the last 3 entry level sales jobs Ive applied for have all ended up with the interviewer judging me as too nice and not pushy enough!?

    Im not about to give up, how can I get sales experience? Pick up the phone and cold call with an imaginary product so I can get the hang of rejection?

    I assume you're a girl.

    During the interview, stop smiling. Don't agree with everything the interviewer says.
    Stop acting like a girl during interviews. Act like a woman who should be taken seriously.

    When the interviewer says;
    "You are too nice for sales. I can imagine you would be great at opening the call and building trust but then one of our senior brokers would have to take the call and close..."

    Say "My prospects will think the same thing. That will build trust. But then I'll close the sale. No prospect can ever accuse me of using high pressure....even when I'm turning it on. Put me on, and I'll show you balls. Now you show me balls, by saying "Yes"".

    And then just sit there and wait. There is an 80% chance that you'll get hired.

    When the interviewer says that to you...it's a test.

    Added later; Pick a company you want to work with, and decide to work there. I've seen hundreds of resumes in my life, and have had hundreds of short interviews with applicants. Do you know how many called me back twice? None. Any extra effort on your part, will stick out like a sore thumb. I'll bet if you just walked into the office of your last interviewer, and said "I decided that here is where I want to work. I want to learn how to sell from you.I won't quit, and I won't waste your time. Fair enough?"

    You would become a topic of conversation, and that story would be told, by the interviewer, for years.

    If an applicant ever showed me a bit of ambition, I'd hire them in a minute. So would any sales company.
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    • Profile picture of the author StephLee
      Originally Posted by Claude Whitacre View Post

      I assume you're a girl.

      During the interview, stop smiling. Don't agree with everything the interviewer says.
      Stop acting like a girl during interviews. Act like a woman who should be taken seriously.

      When the interviewer says;
      "You are too nice for sales. I can imagine you would be great at opening the call and building trust but then one of our senior brokers would have to take the call and close..."

      Say "My prospects will think the same thing. That will build trust. But then I'll close the sale. No prospect can ever accuse me of using high pressure....even when I'm turning it on. Put me on, and I'll show you balls. Now you show me balls, by saying "Yes"".

      And then just sit there and wait. There is an 80% chance that you'll get hired.

      When the interviewer says that to you...it's a test.

      Added later; Pick a company you want to work with, and decide to work there. I've seen hundreds of resumes in my life, and have had hundreds of short interviews with applicants. Do you know how many called me back twice? None. Any extra effort on your part, will stick out like a sore thumb. I'll bet if you just walked into the office of your last interviewer, and said "I decided that here is where I want to work. I want to learn how to sell from you.I won't quit, and I won't waste your time. Fair enough?"

      You would become a topic of conversation, and that story would be told, by the interviewer, for years.

      If an applicant ever showed me a bit of ambition, I'd hire them in a minute. So would any sales company.
      Yes I'm a girl, and what you said about smiling and agreeing just made me replay the interview in my head and realise I was doing exactly that. I was very smiley and approval seeking by trying to inject a bit of humour into the conversation and then chuckling at my own jokes. Very very approval seeking when I think about it now.

      When I came in and met the interviewer, he asked me if I found the place alright and I jokingly said it was fine until I saw their front gates were like the black gates of mordor, because they were huge. LOL. I'm cringing now. And that's why I think at the end of the interview he said we'd be friends outside of work in a heartbeat but at work, I'd struggle.

      Those answers are really ballsy, but what the heck, I'm willing to try. I appreciate your insights, thanks
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      • Profile picture of the author Claude Whitacre
        Originally Posted by StephLee View Post

        . I'm cringing now. And that's why I think at the end of the interview he said we'd be friends outside of work in a heartbeat but at work, I'd struggle.

        Those answers are really ballsy, but what the heck, I'm willing to try. I appreciate your insights, thanks
        You don't have to swear, or say things like "Balls". I said that mostly for effect.

        I've trained lots of salespeople. They come in all sizes, shapes, and temperaments. Some are aggressive, and some are laid back. Some joke a lot, and some are all business.

        But all successful salespeople I've ever known, do have something in common. At their core, they want to make the sale. No matter what it looks like, they are getting closer to a sale.

        I don't know if you can be "too nice". But at the core of all this niceness, you need to be focused on getting the sale...or disqualifying the prospect.

        And, as Misterme said, it isn't for everyone.

        I will say this; If you have the nerve to go back into a company that rejected you, and try again? You probably have what it takes.

        Originally Posted by StephLee View Post

        ''Tell that whoring slab of minimum wage KFC to get up off her seat and turn her printer around and read you the freaking number, stop listening so much and start giving instructions''
        I must have missed this post earlier.

        This company was at the lowest end of the spectrum. You would have hated working there.

        No real business person talks like that to employees, let alone customers.

        The fact that you went back the next day, shows you have a thick enough skin, I think.

        You just need to work at a better company.
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    • Profile picture of the author Synnuh
      Originally Posted by Claude Whitacre View Post

      I assume you're a girl.

      Added later; Pick a company you want to work with, and decide to work there. I've seen hundreds of resumes in my life, and have had hundreds of short interviews with applicants. Do you know how many called me back twice? None. Any extra effort on your part, will stick out like a sore thumb. I'll bet if you just walked into the office of your last interviewer, and said "I decided that here is where I want to work. I want to learn how to sell from you.I won't quit, and I won't waste your time. Fair enough?"

      If an applicant ever showed me a bit of ambition, I'd hire them in a minute. So would any sales company.
      Quoted for truth!
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  • Profile picture of the author AlexTee
    Originally Posted by StephLee View Post

    "You are too nice for sales. I can imagine you would be great at opening the call and building trust but then one of our senior brokers would have to take the call and close..."

    Thats what my last interviewer for a entry level broker position told me. I graduate next year and this summer I really want to learn to sell. But the last 3 entry level sales jobs Ive applied for have all ended up with the interviewer judging me as too nice and not pushy enough!?

    Im not about to give up, how can I get sales experience? Pick up the phone and cold call with an imaginary product so I can get the hang of rejection?

    When you are interviewing for a sales position, the interviewer wants you to close him/her on the position you are applying for.

    All too often (job counselors not familiar with professional sales) tell you not to ask about compensation on the first interview and other stuff that may make you seem "so called" motivated by money.

    In other fields that may get you in trouble but not in a sales interview.

    In sales, the person interviewing you wants to know that you like to make money and want to make money. The person interviewing you may get compensated on your success in selling.

    Closing them on the position you are applying for is one way to demonstrate how you may go about getting the sale.

    Take advantage of today's technology and watch videos on youtube about selling, go to the bookstore and read a book on selling while sipping on some coffee. Go to Amazon and buy a book(s).

    Study then practice....Don't wing it!

    Learn how to ask good closing questions (consultative style) and the interviewers will no longer judge you as too nice and not pushy enough.

    You can be low key and calm yet still be aggressive and polite by asking good laser pointed questions and doing it using a conversational tone.

    The bottom line is........ Sales is about the Money.

    You might like the book "Question Based Selling" by Freese ?? (I think)
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  • Profile picture of the author BrianMcLeod
    TRANSLATION: You're not sociopathic enough for this flea-bitten boiler-room...

    What this room does is not sales - it's just small-ball fraud, desperate to sling cheap knockoff toner to anyone careless enough to let their guard down long enough to let the cockroaches into the pantry.
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    • Profile picture of the author StephLee
      Originally Posted by BrianMcLeod View Post

      TRANSLATION: You're not sociopathic enough for this flea-bitten boiler-room...

      What this room does is not sales - it's just small-ball fraud, desperate to sling cheap knockoff toner to anyone careless enough to let their guard down long enough to let the cockroaches into the pantry.
      The people seemed pleasant enough apart from the trainer, suited and booted with an air of alpha, a bit like Leonardo in the wolf of wall street.

      The part I found difficult was at the start of the script, just after the intro I had to ask what team they supported and tell them because our company was doing so well I was going to send them a free football shirt. Then ask their size and give them a bogus reference number. But if they didn't order a cartridge they didnt get a shirt. lol, I felt like a real bitch.

      I might be nice, but not naive, and I know it's wrong but just thought following through would help me toughen up and earn.

      I'm taking a step back and looking for sales with morals now :-]
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      • Profile picture of the author Claude Whitacre
        Originally Posted by StephLee View Post

        I might be nice, but not naive, and I know it's wrong but just thought following through would help me toughen up and earn.

        I'm taking a step back and looking for sales with morals now :-]
        Being tough in sales doesn't mean lying. In fact, lying will kill any real sales career.

        Being tough just means handling sales rejection without taking it personally, and remembering why you are talking to a prospect.

        If your first experiences in sales is with these lowlifes, you are getting a wrong impression of what sales is all about. Pick a big company, tell them that you want to work there....and tell them that you are there to make them money.
        No established company, with a good reputation, would tell you to lie to a customer.

        It isn't a matter of having morals. The people you talked to were morons. It's a matter of self image.
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  • Profile picture of the author misterme
    Claude beat me to it. But really, take heed. It was a TEST. They wanted to see if you'd fight back and make a case as to how they're so wrong, and how you'd be the best damn sales person they ever saw.

    They tested you to see if you'd have the ego, aggressiveness and bravado it takes to claw your way through to get the sales. Or if you, like so many, would just automatically give up at the first "no" and say "well okay if you say so..."

    BUT... having to tell you this could mean it's not in your nature at all and you'd be better off having another career.
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    • Profile picture of the author StephLee
      Originally Posted by misterme View Post

      Claude beat me to it. But really, take heed. It was a TEST. They wanted to see if you'd fight back and make a case as to how they're so wrong, and how you'd be the best damn sales person they ever saw.

      They tested you to see if you'd have the ego, aggressiveness and bravado it takes to claw your way through to get the sales. Or if you, like so many, would just automatically give up at the first "no" and say "well okay if you say so..."

      BUT... having to tell you this could mean it's not in your nature at all and you'd be better off having another career.
      At the end of the interview he asked if I had any more questions, and I said ''When do I start?'' with a cheeky-grin. It's a line I read when I did a little pre-interview research before I found this forum. Anyway by that stage I think he'd decided already but I said it anyway because I remembered it. It felt clunky and I think being that bold isn't really in my nature but your post has made me even more determined to iron out my lack of assertiveness.
      It feels like a hard journey and it seems I'm not a natural at this but I'm going to learn and I appreciate you calling me out.
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  • Profile picture of the author Underground
    There's being authoritative and then there is being sociapathic. The two tend to overlap on the outside and look a bit like each other, but you can learn to be authoritative without become a nasty, hateful c**t. Probably not from that guy though, because he is one.

    I've known a good few people like that, illiterate millionaires who just knew how to sell. The ones who were proper psychos and had no morals, respect of decency never really seemed happy and at ease. Had stress problems, anger issues, other maladies.

    You're right in trying to find the right environment to be able to get over being too unassertive, but I'm sure you could find a better place to teach you that.

    If you can be assertive and still retain the relationship building stuff, you'll go way further than just being hardsell.
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  • Profile picture of the author Chris Gylseth
    I think the number one thing, especially as new in the field of selling, is to work for a quality, reputable company - a company where you would be proud to tell your friends and family that you work. Add to that their sales training, and it should help you move your career forward.

    There's enough of shady companies out there like that toner company. They usually suffer from bad company culture, high turnovers, and a whole array of other things that can make life miserable. Stay away for all such.

    Jason pointed out how there are several types of sales. You might find that you fit better with a role that has a longer sales cycle, but where building a long lasting relationship with the customer plays a major part in the sale, vs. the hard-selling, one-call-close type of sales.

    Two books to learn from:
    Dale Carnegie: How to win friends & influence people
    Neil Rackham: SPIN selling
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  • Profile picture of the author Josh Mayers
    Hey Steph,

    I went and found this article that gives some helpful tips on sales.

    Thought you may find this helpful.

    Hope this helps out!

    -Josh
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  • Profile picture of the author Jim Kleidon
    Hi Steph,

    Have you considered looking into technical sales?

    Back in the day I was a Sales Engineer for several large tech companies. They would often hire in a junior person who was sharp, articulate, and honest, but not pushy.

    The account managers looked for people who were go-getters, could learn technology, the market, and solution selling techniques. Then they'd groom them over time.

    There's still lots of money to be made in B2B technical sales.

    Cheers!

    -Jim K.
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  • Profile picture of the author Rick Rodd
    To quote Glengarry Glen Ross, "Put that coffee down. Coffee's for closers only."

    Niceties and formalities are reserved during the introductory part of the sales pitch. In the end, you'd still have be use Aggressive Persuasion.Keep in mind why you're in the sales business and with this purpose in mind believe that you can close a deal or die trying.
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    • Profile picture of the author Jason Kanigan
      Originally Posted by Rick Rodd View Post

      To quote Glengarry Glen Ross, "Put that coffee down. Coffee's for closers only."

      Niceties and formalities are reserved during the introductory part of the sales pitch. In the end, you'd still have be use Aggressive Persuasion.Keep in mind why you're in the sales business and with this purpose in mind believe that you can close a deal or die trying.
      Glengarry Glen Ross was a fun play & movie, but totally misrepresented what selling is. And that's all it was: a movie. Pacino has to get blind drunk to sell someone on a piece of property? Give me a break. And then what happens? Buyer's Remorse! The guy wants his money back.

      Selling today is honest, ethical and not at all what you or the movie described. If you tried that "Coffee's for Closers" approach in high level business sales, you'd be laughed out the door. Or booted.

      Why you would want to "close a deal or die trying" is beyond me. There are plenty, PLENTY of great prospects out there. If this one's not a fit, I'll quickly find out and move on.

      I feel truly sorry for the public, who get their education of what selling is like from Boiler Room and similar films that portray salespeople as pushy tricksters who will say anything to separate a hapless mark from their money. And their experience with car dealerships, appliance showrooms and other retail establishments run this way. This is not the case in the real business world. Unfortunately, few members of the general public get to see it.
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      • Profile picture of the author AlexTee
        Originally Posted by Jason Kanigan View Post

        Glengarry Glen Ross was a fun play & movie, but totally misrepresented what selling is. And that's all it was: a movie. Pacino has to get blind drunk to sell someone on a piece of property? Give me a break. And then what happens? Buyer's Remorse!

        Selling today is honest, ethical and not at all what you or the movie described. If you tried that "Coffee's for Closers" approach in high level business sales, you'd be laughed out the door. Or booted.

        Why you would want to "close a deal or die trying" is beyond me. There are plenty, PLENTY of great prospects out there. If this one's not a fit, I'll quickly find out and move on.

        I feel truly sorry for the public, who get their education of what selling is like from Boiler Room and similar films that portray salespeople as pushy tricksters who will say anything to separate a hapless mark from their money. And their experience with car dealerships, appliance showrooms and other retail establishments run this way. This is not the case in the real business world. Unfortunately, few members of the general public get to see it.
        All I can say is....WOW!

        You are dead nuts on this....LOL
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      • Profile picture of the author thet
        Originally Posted by Jason Kanigan View Post

        Glengarry Glen Ross was a fun play & movie, but totally misrepresented what selling is. And that's all it was: a movie. Pacino has to get blind drunk to sell someone on a piece of property? Give me a break. And then what happens? Buyer's Remorse! The guy wants his money back.

        Selling today is honest, ethical and not at all what you or the movie described. If you tried that "Coffee's for Closers" approach in high level business sales, you'd be laughed out the door. Or booted.

        Why you would want to "close a deal or die trying" is beyond me. There are plenty, PLENTY of great prospects out there. If this one's not a fit, I'll quickly find out and move on.

        I feel truly sorry for the public, who get their education of what selling is like from Boiler Room and similar films that portray salespeople as pushy tricksters who will say anything to separate a hapless mark from their money. And their experience with car dealerships, appliance showrooms and other retail establishments run this way. This is not the case in the real business world. Unfortunately, few members of the general public get to see it.
        So what does business 2 business sales look like in the real world? Are there any books or movies, or articles that gives a glimps/a window how it looks in the real world to unplug all the sales conditioning from movies you mentioned?
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    • Profile picture of the author joe golfer
      Originally Posted by Rick Rodd View Post

      To quote Glengarry Glen Ross, "Put that coffee down. Coffee's for closers only."

      Niceties and formalities are reserved during the introductory part of the sales pitch. In the end, you'd still have be use Aggressive Persuasion.Keep in mind why you're in the sales business and with this purpose in mind believe that you can close a deal or die trying.
      What the heck? Is nobody reading Claude's books? You start setting up the close right at the beginning. No wonder there is such turnover in sales.
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      • Profile picture of the author Claude Whitacre
        Originally Posted by joe golfer View Post

        What the heck? Is nobody reading Claude's books? You start setting up the close right at the beginning. No wonder there is such turnover in sales.
        Ahem! Thanks for the plug. But to clarify something...

        Closing is simply clearly explaining what you have, and matching it to the prospect..so that they want to buy (or have disqualified themselves).

        Movie goers see closers as these slimy evil people without souls...who hammer, hammer, hammer...until the customer submits. Nearly all those guys are gone from sales. Maybe they were real in the 1950's...but they are almost all gone.

        Kanigan hit the nail on he head. Closing isn't what you see in the movies. The people who write the scripts aren't salespeople.

        And I do close from the moment I start talking to a prospect. But that doesn't mean I'm hammering them for an order. It means that I clearly understand why I'm talking to this person. And everything I say and do, is directed to either unqualify them, or help support the sale.

        And great closers are loved by their customers. Have you ever talked to an outstanding salesperson? I have. It's like getting a massage. You love the experience. And you walk away happy, and with something that you really want.

        Selling is education and clarity. It isn't something you do to people, it's something you do for people.

        And what can be rewarding that helping your customers benefit and grow?

        And I've watched Glengary Glenn Ross a few times. But only because it's great drama. Nobody in the movie is a salesman. Badgering isn't selling, lying isn't selling, stealing leads isn't selling, and whining about your lot in life isn't selling.

        And if someone yelled at me "Coffee is for Closers!"....I'd drink the damn coffee.

        To the OP. Why not insurance? Any major company will give you a starting salary against future commissions. You'll get fantastic training, and you'll learn how to sell the right way.
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        • Profile picture of the author joe golfer
          Originally Posted by Claude Whitacre View Post

          Ahem! Thanks for the plug. But to clarify something...

          Closing is simply clearly explaining what you have, and matching it to the prospect..so that they want to buy (or have disqualified themselves).

          Movie goers see closers as these slimy evil people without souls...who hammer, hammer, hammer...until the customer submits. Nearly all those guys are gone from sales. Maybe they were real in the 1950's...but they are almost all gone.

          Kanigan hit the nail on he head. Closing isn't what you see in the movies. The people who write the scripts aren't salespeople.

          And I do close from the moment I start talking to a prospect. But that doesn't mean I'm hammering them for an order. It means that I clearly understand why I'm talking to this person. And everything I say and do, is directed to either unqualify them, or help support the sale.

          And great closers are loved by their customers. Have you ever talked to an outstanding salesperson? I have. It's like getting a massage. You love the experience. And you walk away happy, and with something that you really want.

          Selling is education and clarity. It isn't something you do to people, it's something you do for people.

          And what can be rewarding that helping your customers benefit and grow?

          And I've watched Glengary Glenn Ross a few times. But only because it's great drama. Nobody in the movie is a salesman. Badgering isn't selling, lying isn't selling, stealing leads isn't selling, and whining about your lot in life isn't selling.

          And if someone yelled at me "Coffee is for Closers!"....I'd drink the damn coffee.

          To the OP. Why not insurance? Any major company will give you a starting salary against future commissions. You'll get fantastic training, and you'll learn how to sell the right way.
          Yeah! That's what I meant!
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  • Profile picture of the author jainaherz3
    Thousand of opportunities are available in the market other than Brokerage House.

    So if you really want to get some sales experience, choose 1 field of your like in which you can give your 100% to generate more customers and get handsome money in your pocket.

    I hope you understand what I mean to say.

    - Jaina
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  • Profile picture of the author Rick Rodd
    So that's why I haven't been into the sales business and very unlucky in relationships...My outdated tactics I'm using from 50's! Thanks Claude and Jason. I really appreciate the learnings. Art of Selling, you're out of my favorite films!
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  • Profile picture of the author helisell
    Saying "You're too nice for sales" is just an old interviewers trick to see how you react.

    It's just an invitation to you to "sell yourself"

    So this is what you do...

    "When you say I'm too nice to be in sales....what exactly do you mean by that?" (get them to enlarge on what they said)

    Then....
    "Let me ask you a question....are you saying that it's not possible to be an effective salesperson and still be nice"

    Then ask.....
    "If you found a salesperson who was very effective and productive....but just happened to be nice...wouldn't you be happy about that?"

    Then
    "If you found a salesperson who was naturally nice but had a burning desire to be in sales and was prepared to do whatever was neccessary to achieve great success.....WHEN WOULD YOU WANT ME TO START?"

    You'll get the job!

    Good luck.
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  • Profile picture of the author atrbiz
    Steph, a lot of great suggestions here for you..bottom line, go into those interviews and stand your ground, be firm and show them you're not scared to sell. Put on your game face, you've got this! Go get em!!
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  • Profile picture of the author dgui123451
    You should first try searching on google for videos that would help you to become better sales person
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  • Profile picture of the author thet
    What if a person is really too nice for sales? Or isn't that possible?

    Can somebody un-nice himself to do the job well? Become "harder"? A bull, a tiger, a dragon?
    Or, once born as a mice, always a mice?

    What are ways to become more dragonish?
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    • Profile picture of the author Jason Kanigan
      Originally Posted by thet View Post

      What if a person is really too nice for sales? Or isn't that possible?

      Can somebody un-nice himself to do the job well? Become "harder"? A bull, a tiger, a dragon?
      Or, once born as a mice, always a mice?

      What are ways to become more dragonish?
      You have the wrong (outdated) view of what selling is.

      Selling is not about overbearing, convincing, persuading, bamboozling, fooling or beating up your prospect.

      What people are missing is a consistent process to follow. They have no idea where they are and their sales conversations are a disaster.

      It doesn't matter whether you are "nice" or "tough"...the question is: Do you know what's happening, and why? What is going to happen next?

      Most people have no clue what is going on.

      When you consider that companies send buyers to school to learn how to unravel selling, and these buyers often know more than salespeople about selling, is it a surprise?

      Laziness and complacency are at the bottom of this. Would you try to become an engineer without training or learning something about the subject? An accountant? A doctor?

      Then why do we believe people can hop right into selling and be good at it?

      Again, "nice" or "not nice" is a red herring. You can succeed being either. The key factor lies elsewhere.
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      • Profile picture of the author thet
        Originally Posted by Jason Kanigan View Post

        You have the wrong (outdated) view of what selling is.

        Selling is not about overbearing, convincing, persuading, bamboozling, fooling or beating up your prospect.

        What people are missing is a consistent process to follow. They have no idea where they are and their sales conversations are a disaster.

        It doesn't matter whether you are "nice" or "tough"...the question is: Do you know what's happening, and why? What is going to happen next?

        Most people have no clue what is going on.

        When you consider that companies send buyers to school to learn how to unravel selling, and these buyers often know more than salespeople about selling, is it a surprise?

        Laziness and complacency are at the bottom of this. Would you try to become an engineer without training or learning something about the subject? An accountant? A doctor?

        Then why do we believe people can hop right into selling and be good at it?

        Again, "nice" or "not nice" is a red herring. You can succeed being either. The key factor lies elsewhere.
        So what are the key points to focus on, besides being aware of the process as you call it?
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  • Profile picture of the author franergy
    I'm a girl :-) and I'm nice - it's not about NOT being nice, it's about having a sales protocol that works. Don't believe the hype. If your sales process is badass - you can "nicely" walk any targeted prospect right to the dotted line. So, you don't need to change who you are, you need a proven sales process. I worked in sales for a Fortune 50 company that sells some of the best brands in the world - and I kicked ass before I left to start my own company. When I wasn't doing well - it wasn't b/c I was a girl or too nice - it was b/c I was straying from my sales training. Find one that works - and work it. Good luck.
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