The Myth That Following Your Passion Will Make You Money

37 replies
Yes I am calling out as 99% B.S this follow your passion and make money thing
but
before you reply read my entire post because there is more to this being passionate and making money thing than meets the eye. :-)

I see this happening over and over again on this forum.
Someone says "I really love XYZ as a subject, can I make money at it?"

Then in come a bunch of responses like:
"you can't go wrong following your passion"
or
"to make money you have to find something your passionate about"
or
"you will never be happy if you are not passionate about what you do"

That is WAY too simplistic, generally wrong and often wastes years of someones time! It seems to me we all tip toe around like parents not wanting to say there is no Santa when someone says they are passionate about some subject that we all know will not make them any money.

Sadly most of the time what they say they are passionate about has as much chance of making them money as I do of sprouting wings. Actually if they are asking the question they are almost doomed to failure!

Think about it. When is the last time you saw a post that said "I am passionate about stocks and bonds can I make money?" or "I am passionate about having the most successful bait and tackle shop in my town can I make money?"
NEVER!
Instead its "I am passionate about sandals for poodles can I make money."

The other issue is they are not really that passionate about it so don't be afraid to shove them in another direction. If they were told the truth that they will likely be blogging for two years about something that will make them no money their supposed passion would quickly evaporate! Hec my kids growing up have been excited about something different every month until they were educated about it.

So as a public service announcement I will put myself out there and point out these two truths.

1. For the bulk of people/businesses there is no direct relationship between their passion for the product/service they sell and the revenue generated.

Lets face it the really rich people are selling toilet paper and cotton swabs. Do you think they are passionate about cotton swabs? NOPE! BUT they love their life, are passionate about deeper business goals and lifestyle. Many others are selling real items people need and buy everyday like appliances or vacuums. Sure they know their product but are they passionate about it? More likely they are passionate about the end result! See my next point.

2. The REAL passion for most is generally NOT in what they do or sell but in the outcome. Most people could be very happy doing/selling a million different things if the result of doing that brought them success and happiness in their personal lives. For example if your goal was to work with your wife and kids and afford your family a nice lifestyle doing something honest that provides value to customers would it matter much what the product/service was?

Are there exceptions? of course.
It is fair to say when passion meets skill and demand it can be amazing.
When this happens we end up with people like industry leaders, singers, and all kinds of superstars BUT the truth is 99.9% of the people in this world will be very happy and will never reach those levels. Further even those people (think retired hockey players) who were passionate about what they did find other things to be passionate about when that ends.

It seems absurd to me to give the same pep talk or advice of "just follow your passion and you will make money" that you would give to a gifted pianist who was having a bad day and did not want to practice. We know the pianist has a gift and a market waiting for him. The guy selling sandals to poodles not so much.

This feel good type of advice does more harm than good.
#make #money #myth #passion
  • Profile picture of the author Darkhealer
    I agree with most of your post with some slight reservations. I definitely believe that the rich people you mentioned selling cotton swabs perhaps don't care/have a huge passion for their product but what they love is business itself. They have a passion for being an entrepreneur, for creating processes and systems to grow a business, to hire and manage and establish projects and actually use their brains to try and grow and sustain their business. I believe that is where those individuals end up succeeding because they do follow their passions: business/entreprenurship, not a product.
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    • Profile picture of the author Peter Lessard
      Originally Posted by Darkhealer View Post

      I agree with most of your post with some slight reservations. I definitely believe that the rich people you mentioned selling cotton swabs perhaps don't care/have a huge passion for their product but what they love is business itself. They have a passion for being an entrepreneur, for creating processes and systems to grow a business, to hire and manage and establish projects and actually use their brains to try and grow and sustain their business. I believe that is where those individuals end up succeeding because they do follow their passions: business/entreprenurship, not a product.
      We are in perfect agreement. It is what I was saying in point 2 stated in a different way. More often than not the person seeking advice on these forums saying I like XYZ needs more prodding for information on what they are really after so we can better advise them.
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    • Profile picture of the author Claude Whitacre
      Yeah, the way the vast majority of people mean "Following your passion will make you money" makes no sense.

      When I sell a vacuum cleaner, am I passionate about vacuums? No. Am I even really interested in them? No. They are a vehicle. I'm more interested in the craft of selling.

      And like many business people, the product isn't a passion. But maybe running a profitable company is.


      I might modify the statement to "Follow your passion. And it your passion happens to be in demand by other people...and they pay you...you'll make lots of money".

      Yeah, the "Follow your passion" statements are usually written by passionate people. Not wealthy ones.
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      • Profile picture of the author Peter Lessard
        Originally Posted by Claude Whitacre View Post

        Yeah, the way the vast majority of people mean "Following your passion will make you money" makes no sense.

        When I sell a vacuum cleaner, am I passionate about vacuums? No. Am I even really interested in them? No. They are a vehicle. I'm more interested in the craft of selling.

        And like many business people, the product isn't a passion. But maybe running a profitable company is.


        I might modify the statement to "Follow your passion. And it your passion happens to be in demand by other people...and they pay you...you'll make lots of money".

        Yeah, the "Follow your passion" statements are usually written by passionate people. Not wealthy ones.
        LOL yes this should be the new response:

        "Follow your passion. And if your passion happens to be in demand by other people...and they pay you...you'll make lots of money"

        or perhaps

        Subject + Passion + Demand by paying customers = $
        Subject + Passion - Demand by by paying customers = hobby
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      • Profile picture of the author Trollfarie
        Originally Posted by Claude Whitacre View Post

        Yeah, the way the vast majority of people mean "Following your passion will make you money" makes no sense.

        When I sell a vacuum cleaner, am I passionate about vacuums? No. Am I even really interested in them? No. They are a vehicle. I'm more interested in the craft of selling.

        And like many business people, the product isn't a passion. But maybe running a profitable company is.


        I might modify the statement to "Follow your passion. And it your passion happens to be in demand by other people...and they pay you...you'll make lots of money".

        Yeah, the "Follow your passion" statements are usually written by passionate people. Not wealthy ones.
        I agree. You can often twist your passion to match your monetary goals, as well. My passion is writing. I discovered I'd never make enough money from writing novels. So, I write great content for businesses that want to increase their page rank. I still get to do what I love and make a living at the same time. It is all in the way you approach things.
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      • Profile picture of the author The Niche Man
        Originally Posted by Claude Whitacre View Post

        Yeah, the "Follow your passion" statements are usually written by passionate people. Not wealthy ones.
        Wow! Did you get that one wrong. Read the biographies of most wealthy people, the ones who actually made the money ( not their great grand children) and passion and love for the product or service usually surfaces.
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  • Profile picture of the author John_3771
    I agree with most of what you say. I think that some people confuse running a business with thinking that it is a hobby. If it is a hobby to you and you don't really need to make a living with it and just want to have fun and make a little extra cash then you may be able to follow a passion of yours and make some money with it. If you're serious about running an online business and want to make serious cash with it, then I would much rather focus on proven niche markets that are making lots of other people full-time incomes online. It is just common sense and sadly that gets lost on people sometimes.
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  • Profile picture of the author DaniMc
    The book "So Good They Can't Ignore You: Why Skills Trump Passion in the Quest for Work You Love" by Cal Newport is one of the most influential books I have ever read. I am a serious reader (50-100 or more books per year) and this book changed my career and direction more than any other. I listened to the audio and read the actual book and the audio is better, IMO.

    People following passion get led astray all the time. The key is to start exactly where you are and work within the realm of the immediate possible.

    Too many of us, myself included, have made the mistake of starting out on some grand pursuit that requires starting completely from scratch. Starting from scratch is much more difficult that building on what already exists.

    For anyone struggling to find a direction or clarify their goals, I highly recommend the audio version of the above book.
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    • Profile picture of the author Peter Lessard
      Originally Posted by Dan McCoy View Post

      The book "So Good They Can't Ignore You: Why Skills Trump Passion in the Quest for Work You Love" by Cal Newport is one of the most influential books I have ever read. I am a serious reader (50-100 or more books per year) and this book changed my career and direction more than any other. I listened to the audio and read the actual book and the audio is better, IMO.

      People following passion get led astray all the time. They key is to start exactly where you are and work within the realm of the immediate possible.

      Too many of us, myself included, have made the mistake of starting out on some grand pursuit that requires starting completely from scratch. Starting from scratch is much more difficult that building on what already exists.

      For anyone struggling to find a direction or clarify their goals, I highly recommend the audio version of the above book.
      I am going to check out the audio, you are the second person to recommend to me now!

      One point you made really struck home. "Starting from scratch is much more difficult that building on what already exists."

      I have often over the years solved business/financial issues by stopping, taking a breath and taking stock of the resources I already had. For example some people may be suffering financially, clawing for new customers. Then they stop, come up with a great offer for existing/past customers and voila problem solved! Knowing where you are NOW, what you have NOW and can do NOW is so important!
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      • Profile picture of the author ronr
        I agree and disagree.

        Of course you need more than just the love of something to make money at it.

        But if have a passion and skills it's the best.

        I created an info product for a niche that I loved (a hobby that I turned into a business)

        Sold mid $ six figures of the course and really enjoyed it. It seldom seemed like work.

        Could I have done it if i wasn't passionate about it? Most likely because I had the skills, but my passion showed and I really connected with those in the niche.

        Could I done it with a niche I really didn't like or relate to? Maybe. Knowing me I probably wouldn't have got very far creating the course because it wasn't interesting to me.

        Ron
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    • Profile picture of the author Charles Harper
      Originally Posted by Dan McCoy View Post

      The book "So Good They Can't Ignore You: Why Skills Trump Passion in the Quest for Work You Love" by Cal Newport is one of the most influential books I have ever read. I am a serious reader (50-100 or more books per year) and this book changed my career and direction more than any other. I listened to the audio and read the actual book and the audio is better, IMO.

      People following passion get led astray all the time. The key is to start exactly where you are and work within the realm of the immediate possible.

      Too many of us, myself included, have made the mistake of starting out on some grand pursuit that requires starting completely from scratch. Starting from scratch is much more difficult that building on what already exists.

      For anyone struggling to find a direction or clarify their goals, I highly recommend the audio version of the above book.
      That was an awesome book.

      I would think that Outliers, by Malcolm Gladwell supports the same thing.

      Also...Mastery by Robert Greene.

      Charles
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  • Profile picture of the author Yvon Boulianne
    I'll replace passion with Dreams

    Follow your dreams and monetize them

    What your future are looking for ?

    Another favorite is "Where do you want to go ? What price are you willing to pay ?"

    Once you know that it`s only a thing of putting a feet after another until you got it BUT don`t forget your dreams!!!

    Do you think a climber will forget that his goals is the top of the mountain ? don`t think he...

    So keep an eye on your dreams and go for it AND never ever surrender

    Have a great time
    Yvon
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  • Profile picture of the author mattbau43
    Following your passion does not equal good business. One of the key tenets to operating a business is separating your emotions from your business decisions.

    With that being said, would you like to run a passionless business?
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  • Profile picture of the author hewlett
    I like this thread. While I don't relish being the cranky person telling people not to bother pursuing your dreams, I agree that it's irresponsible to tell people to pursue their passions. Unless your passions are things like stock broking, real estate sales or commodities trading, then passions are best enjoyed outside of work.
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  • Profile picture of the author rafsco
    Many people get into business without having a clue on how to find customers.That's when reality hits.
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  • Profile picture of the author Jason Kanigan
    You CAN use your passion to fuel your business.

    The missing key is to find where your passion overlaps solving a serious problem for a target market that can afford to help you reach your revenue targets.

    So you love venus flytraps (someone has to).

    I encourage you to talk about venus flytraps all day long.

    But before you start doing that, I want you to discover the right direction to point yourself in. That way, when you open your mouth, the people who hear you will be receptive and able to pay for your expertise. Perhaps the wholesaling of venus flytraps on the way to retail stores is the right direction. Move units by volume and make good money doing so.

    A bad 'for instance' would be branding yourself as The Venus Flytrap Doctor, willing to travel to individual homes and cure these plants of their ills. You would never make enough money that way because your target market could not afford to pay you enough. (Though branding yourself as such and gunning to be the highly-paid spokesperson of the industry...that could pay off).

    Another 'for instance'...you like talking about the latest high tech gizmos. That's great, but on its own it won't make you a dime. Put up a blog and watch the tumbleweeds blow by. It's a crowded market and how are you going to stand out? But take that passion to the hardware sales arena, and make sure your prospects are like-minded gearheads...and now you have a competitive advantage that will massively help you stand out to your customers. They will buy from you because you are like them. You will have awesome conversations with your prospects and customers, and be memorable. Contrast with the product pusher who walks in, shoves their hardware at them, and leaves.

    This is not the first time the Follow Your Passion? question has been brought up, and last time I made this graphic to explain the solution:


    Where people fall down with following their passion is not picking their target market well enough. Yes, pick something you like to talk about all day as the focus of your business. That will help you a lot. It's easy to become genuinely happy when you're doing so. But make sure you have also picked a target market that can support your money needs. Otherwise your business is DEAD.
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    • Profile picture of the author Peter Lessard
      Excellent response!

      If every time someone says can I make money with niche X and the people that responded took the time to offer value like this then I would not of even needed to create this thread :-)

      It is the one line responses of "go for it man you can always make money if your passionate about it" that offer no value and can lead a newbie down the wrong path.

      Of course I am VERY passionate about what I do and my thread is not to discourage anyone it is just to make sure they go in with their eyes open and find the best angle possible.


      Originally Posted by Jason Kanigan View Post

      You CAN use your passion to fuel your business.

      The missing key is to find where your passion overlaps solving a serious problem for a target market that can afford to help you reach your revenue targets.

      So you love venus flytraps (someone has to).

      I encourage you to talk about venus flytraps all day long.

      But before you start doing that, I want you to discover the right direction to point yourself in. That way, when you open your mouth, the people who hear you will be receptive and able to pay for your expertise. Perhaps the wholesaling of venus flytraps on the way to retail stores is the right direction. Move units by volume and make good money doing so.

      A bad 'for instance' would be branding yourself as The Venus Flytrap Doctor, willing to travel to individual homes and cure these plants of their ills. You would never make enough money that way because your target market could not afford to pay you enough. (Though branding yourself as such and gunning to be the highly-paid spokesperson of the industry...that could pay off).

      Another 'for instance'...you like talking about the latest high tech gizmos. That's great, but on its own it won't make you a dime. Put up a blog and watch the tumbleweeds blow by. It's a crowded market and how are you going to stand out? But take that passion to the hardware sales arena, and make sure your prospects are like-minded gearheads...and now you have a competitive advantage that will massively help you stand out to your customers. They will buy from you because you are like them. You will have awesome conversations with your prospects and customers, and be memorable. Contrast with the product pusher who walks in, shoves their hardware at them, and leaves.

      This is not the first time the Follow Your Passion? question has been brought up, and last time I made this graphic to explain the solution:


      Where people fall down with following their passion is not picking their target market well enough. Yes, pick something you like to talk about all day as the focus of your business. That will help you a lot. It's easy to become genuinely happy when you're doing so. But make sure you have also picked a target market that can support your money needs. Otherwise your business is DEAD.
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  • Profile picture of the author SEO Power
    I've been a member of an affiliate marketing training site where they not only preach the 'follow your passion and you will make money' mantra, but also tell their members that they can make money from any niche and keyword. That kind of advice is misleading and I figured out later on that they were trying to delay the success of their members so they'd keep renewing their subscriptions.

    Your passion will not necessarily set you on the path to making money. But if you are lucky and find your passion in a profitable niche, you will make lots of money.
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  • Profile picture of the author mjbmedia
    We have a local butcher, top class meat ,service, everything impressive.

    I was speaking to him, its his passion, his business and quality meat are his passion, he wants to make more money but doesn't want to open another shop etc.

    So I said teach other butchers (remotely) to have the same ethos, the same quality the same service levels, how to notice and source high quality produce and then display and sell it and upsell etc etc .

    A 'basic' one man butchers business (OK he has a couple staff but its his own one man business) and theres so much more monetisation of that business and his skillsets that can be profitably used . Why stop at the basics

    be interesting to see if he goes with it
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  • Profile picture of the author David Daygin
    Simply: you have a business to run which means profits. It means evaluating opportunities logically. Run your passion through your analysis. If it pencils out great. If not move on. There is no yes or no answer to be applied to every passion.
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  • Profile picture of the author tryinhere
    I get it, do not follow your passion, worry about money, and end up like the 70% plus amount of people working in jobs they hate, after time they gut stuck there, pay the bills or something like that and they end up working a lifetime doing what they hate and as a bonus they get an early ticket by the gate keeper to the big sky.

    They sell their dreams and ideas for the money they have now, even though they hate it, and day by day they are not living but dying a slow self endured death.

    So call me one of your BS people, because I see people every day, dying living the slow death, given up on their dreams and passions and I would encourage every one to have the courage to leave the drudge and forgotten dreams to live their passion, a person who lives as they want will be far richer in every part of their life than those that chase money alone.
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    • Profile picture of the author Charles Harper
      Originally Posted by tryinhere View Post

      I get it, do not follow your passion, worry about money, and end up like the 70% plus amount of people working in jobs they hate, after time they gut stuck there, pay the bills or something like that and they end up working a lifetime doing what they hate and as a bonus they get an early ticket by the gate keeper to the big sky.

      They sell their dreams and ideas for the money they have now, even though they hate it, and day by day they are not living but dying a slow self endured death.

      So call me one of your BS people, because I see people every day, dying living the slow death, given up on their dreams and passions and I would encourage every one to have the courage to leave the drudge and forgotten dreams to live their passion, a person who lives as they want will be far richer in every part of their life than those that chase money alone.
      One element of the conversation that has only been implied here (and not discussed directly), is mastery.

      Those that attain mastery at something, seem to be able to find their passion and get paid.

      Except that most of us aren't willing to stick out the 10,000 hours (<b>Outliers/Gladwell</b>Outliers/Gladwell ) that it typically takes to find the fusion between mastery and passion.

      Charles
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    • Profile picture of the author DaniMc
      Originally Posted by tryinhere View Post

      I get it, do not follow your passion, worry about money, and end up like the 70% plus amount of people working in jobs they hate, after time they gut stuck there, pay the bills or something like that and they end up working a lifetime doing what they hate and as a bonus they get an early ticket by the gate keeper to the big sky.

      They sell their dreams and ideas for the money they have now, even though they hate it, and day by day they are not living but dying a slow self endured death.

      So call me one of your BS people, because I see people every day, dying living the slow death, given up on their dreams and passions and I would encourage every one to have the courage to leave the drudge and forgotten dreams to live their passion, a person who lives as they want will be far richer in every part of their life than those that chase money alone.
      I agree with you. I think chasing money is an absolute waste of time. The harder I chase it...the more it eludes me.

      I don't think this is really a passion vs. money argument.

      I have seen people chase money and end up broke and miserable.

      I have seen people chase passion and end up broke and miserable.

      I believe the key is to chase skill.

      Hone a skill that is valuable.

      Passion comes from being good at something. A few posts up someone talks about a passionate butcher. I don't believe for a minute he was born with a passion for meat.

      Rather, we become passionate about the things that give us a sense of fulfillment.

      If I followed my original passions I would have died a junkie in a motorcycle club. "Ride or Die"

      Instead of just following passions, it is much better to learn a skill that is very valuable. As I get better and better, I love it more and more.

      This is the path to mastery. People aren't born with the correct passions. Our basic drive is eat, sleep, sex...but we learn to like other things as we get better at them and find them more rewarding.

      I doubt anyone here was born with a passion for SEO. But as they got better, it became fun. It started to feel rewarding. Now, the good ones, are passionate about it.

      Passion is the result of skill.
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      • Profile picture of the author jimbo13
        Originally Posted by Dan McCoy View Post

        If I followed my original passions I would have died a junkie in a motorcycle club. "Ride or Die"
        Possibly.

        Or perhaps you may have started a motorcycle dealership or started motorcycle tours around the USA etc etc.

        How large you would wish to make the venture is up to you. A nice ticking along business or a large enterprise.

        Just examples as I don't know you and am assuming you like motorbikes from your post.

        If your passion was inventing weird events such as underwater long jump then yep, get real and do something else.

        Dan
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    • Profile picture of the author Peter Lessard
      Originally Posted by tryinhere View Post

      I get it, do not follow your passion, worry about money, and end up like the 70% plus amount of people working in jobs they hate, after time they gut stuck there, pay the bills or something like that and they end up working a lifetime doing what they hate and as a bonus they get an early ticket by the gate keeper to the big sky.

      They sell their dreams and ideas for the money they have now, even though they hate it, and day by day they are not living but dying a slow self endured death.

      So call me one of your BS people, because I see people every day, dying living the slow death, given up on their dreams and passions and I would encourage every one to have the courage to leave the drudge and forgotten dreams to live their passion, a person who lives as they want will be far richer in every part of their life than those that chase money alone.
      Of course I could not agree more and obviously my post was not suggesting living a life without passion in either work, play or relationships. What I am saying is that often on this forum the conversations do not go deep enough nor does the analysis of many about where their true passions lie.
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  • Profile picture of the author graphicsdev
    I agree with all your points as well.. but on some areas PASSION can MAKE YOU MONEY..

    Someone who loves taking pictures can turn his passion into a Photography service
    A housewife who loves to cook can turn her passion into a FOOD business
    A guy who likes to draw can turn his passion into Graphic Desgn/Illustration


    I think it also depends on your motivation to make money...
    Are you motivated to sell xxproductxx since you like the money or the end result?
    Or are you motivated to ENJOY your passion and sell a service/product from it?
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    • Profile picture of the author The Niche Man
      I admit "follow your passion" is one of the most overused cliches. It's almost up there with 'Have a Good Day" and "Shoot For The Moon".

      But, I wouldn't demote the importance of passion so quickly. Passion is what keeps you going when you run up against brick walls, obstacles and other unexpected surprises, most businesses go through.

      Long before the money comes - or before your experience carries you, that's often all a newbie has to work with - that keeps him going.

      Personally, I don't think it's always an either or answer. But starting off as a newbie I see it as a tool ... not a weight to have passion for what you do. Just make sure you do the homework/research and find out if people are paying for products or services in your passion. That's the key.

      These people may be lying but most successful business people with household names put passion toward the top of their list. For example, Donald Trump, Steve Jobs, Opray Winfrey, and a host of others.

      Question: If most of you had a choice to do business with someone who had a passion for what they were doing vs. someone who did it only for the money which would you choose?

      Which surgeon would you want operating on you or a family member?
      Which mechanic do you want repairing the brakes on your car?

      Which do you think would do the better job?

      When you look at it from that angle, "Have a Passion for What You Do" is more than just a cliche. It's a tool for success.

      Dig This.

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  • Profile picture of the author Yvon Boulianne
    Loving what you do is verry easy when you have success (doing awesome jobs) but it also have to be something that peoples are hungry for..

    How many poor artist that love their music but that are very poor there is you think ?

    A LOT !!!

    And btw if you don`t have a fragile EGO (personality) it`s easy to learn to love a lot of thing.

    I see that there`s also other factor, like where are you on your path (that part is esotheric..) do you want to be someone that do manual labor for xyz reason or you prefer to teach mediation for xyz reason ?

    What you do is what`s important in a way, it`s your mind state while you do it that is more important..

    There`s many variables but one thing sure, you better learn to love what you do whatever it is, make the journey worthwile
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  • Profile picture of the author bradhog
    I have a keen interest in Recurring Revenue Softaare development and suggest me if there is any scope out there in this field.....????
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  • Profile picture of the author big tymer
    The problem is something may be your passion but it may not translate into a source of income. I guess something like this is where the term "starving artist" came from as artists have a passion but most don't make any money from it.
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    • Profile picture of the author The Niche Man
      Originally Posted by big tymer View Post

      The problem is something may be your passion but it may not translate into a source of income. I guess something like this is where the term "starving artist" came from as artists have a passion but most don't make any money from it.
      That's true. But there's not just starving artist.

      There's ...
      1. Starving salesmen
      2. Starving restaurant owners
      3. Starving real estate investors and agents
      And even starving internet marketers!

      Passion is an important part of the puzzle - but still just a part. The whole puzzle involves elements already mentioned in this thread.

      1. Skill Level.
      2. Profitable Untapped Market.
      3. Passion.


      It's like a 3 legged stool. If you're missing one of the legs you're in danger of toppling over when an obstacle or challenge shakes you.
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    • Profile picture of the author misterme
      Originally Posted by big tymer View Post

      The problem is something may be your passion but it may not translate into a source of income. I guess something like this is where the term "starving artist" came from as artists have a passion but most don't make any money from it.
      I believe it's more like if someone has a passion for doing something that doesn't have much of any market willing to pay enough to sustain the business. Passion alone doesn't do a thing.

      I have a passion for a couple of things no one would ever pay me for. Sex and martinis.

      Not even in that order.

      Anyway, when an artist starves it's usually because they're just horrible and can't market their stuff OR great but can't market and sell to save their butts. I mean look at Thomas Kinkaid, he did very, very well. Whereas Van Gogh, I think it was, sold one piece in his lifetime and that was to his brother. But you could be average even mediocre (which is another way of saying, "average") and if you market and sell well enough, prosper.
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      • Profile picture of the author DaniMc
        Originally Posted by The Niche Man View Post

        Wow! Did you get that one wrong. Read the biographies of most wealthy people, the ones who actually made the money ( not their great grand children) and passion and love for the product or service usually surfaces.
        The book I referenced above examines how many of the most wealthy, Steve Jobs included, said "Follow your passion" but did something completely different. Steve Jobs did not follow his passion.

        Gaining a valuable skill came first...and then they became passionate about something that was able to bring lots of success.

        I urge everyone to check that book out. It is based on rigorous academic research, interviews, and real life examples. It is a career changing book.
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      • Profile picture of the author The Niche Man
        Originally Posted by misterme View Post

        Passion alone doesn't do a thing.
        True. But then skill "alone" or marketing "alone" doesn't do a thing either, you need all three, working in harmony to get the maximum benefit.

        Originally Posted by misterme View Post

        I have a passion for a couple of things no one would ever pay me for. Sex and martinis.
        If you say no one would pay you I believe it and I'm not encouraging it. But, you do realize hundreds, thousands, maybe millions of people get paid good money in those industries? Right?

        I know you basically said it tongue in cheek, but I'm using it to make a point. Personal perception can play a huge role in determining whether you can make money from something or not.

        For example, if people say you're wasting your time trying to make money from "that", it could be a green light to go full speed ahead. You may see something they don't. This scenario happens all the time.

        In fact, most products you see today that are household names started that way. Critics practically questioned the creators sanity at the start. Everything from Apple Computer to Zappos. If Steve Jobs had depended on a Google or Keyword Search, we may never have heard of Apple Computers.

        Originally Posted by misterme View Post

        Anyway, when an artist starves it's usually because they're just horrible and can't market their stuff OR great but can't market and sell to save their butts.
        I agree. A starving artist is just a good artist who can't (or won't) market. It's certainly not because people have stopped buying art. They sell the stuff all over the world - from the richest countries to the poorest.

        Originally Posted by misterme View Post

        I mean look at Thomas Kinkaid, he did very, very well. Whereas Van Gogh, I think it was, sold one piece in his lifetime and that was to his brother.
        Good point. Thomas Kinkaid is a good example of a person who had all three legs of the stool going. Skill ... Marketing Talent ... and Passion.

        Van Gogh was missing a leg (pardon the pun) of the 3 legged stool.
        He obviously had skills and passion. But he had no marketing talent. He probably didn't even care about it at the time ... he probably just loved to paint.


        Originally Posted by misterme View Post

        But you could be average even mediocre (which is another way of saying, "average") and if you market and sell well enough, prosper.
        You got that right. Anyone who doesn't believe that, just look at "The Kardashians"
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  • Profile picture of the author socialentry
    Whoever wants a warning that passion alone =/= $$$ dough $$$$$, take a look at
    Nikola Tesla!!!
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  • Profile picture of the author sdentrepreneur
    Being an Entrepreneur pretty much my whole life, there is NO WAY I would start any business if I wasn't passionate about the product or service. I prefer to make less money to do something I loved and am passionate about, than doing something just for the money. I know many people feel different, this is just my opinion on this subject. :-)

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    • Profile picture of the author Peter Lessard
      Originally Posted by sdentrepreneur View Post

      Being an Entrepreneur pretty much my whole life, there is NO WAY I would start any business if I wasn't passionate about the product or service. I prefer to make less money to do something I loved and am passionate about, than doing something just for the money. I know many people feel different, this is just my opinion on this subject. :-)

      sdentrepreneur
      #lifeisgood
      I could not agree with you more! Of course my post was digging deeper than this. None of us are passionate about just one thing and most of us have the sense to know that some things we are passionate about are not a business. My post is to try and help those that are just discovering their passions and also to make sure they don't take off the cuff advice from the endless parade of people that seem to support any idea no matter how stupid if the person says "but I am passionate about it..."
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