Should You Add Location Name in Location Intent Adwords Campaigns

9 replies
  • PPC/SEM
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Let's say you had an Adwords Campaign with geotarget intent only with Seattle, WA USA.

I'm changing the keywords but this is an actual example.

You have phrase match "seattle mountain bikes"

And you have in the same ad group exact match [mountain bikes]

The exact match should also match for the search: seattle mountain bikes as Google sees the search location intent in the query because of the city name. But the phrase match is also going to match. Coincidentally, the current quality score is 7 for the phrase match and 5 for the exact match! This would lead me to believe, even on location intent only targeted campaigns, you should also include keywords with the location name for the potential of a better quality score.

The bigger question is which match would Google select to send to the auction consider the user types the word Seattle, the phrase match with Seattle in it or the exact match? (assuming Google never sends more than one match from within the same Ad group to the auction of course.)
#add #adwords #campaigns #intent #location
  • Originally Posted by consultant1027 View Post

    The exact match should also match for the search: seattle mountain bikes
    No. That's not how exact match works. Exact match would trigger your ad on "mountain bikes", not "seattle mountain bikes". A phrase match of "mountain bikes" would however. I assume you don't have that keyword.

    The QS are different because they are different keywords and have produced different results when ads are shown. Don't forget that QS is a comparative measure of how well you do against competitors for that keyword.
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    • Profile picture of the author dburk
      Hi consultant1027,

      As Lucid pointed out, the exact match keywords only trigger impression on the exact term (or close variants) .

      In the event you have more than one keyword that could potentially trigger an ad impression AdWords will always use the keyword with the highest ad rank score. Ad Rank score is calculated by multiplying your Max CPC bid by your Quality Score.
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      • Profile picture of the author consultant1027
        In a campaign with geotargeting that includes search intent, the exact match keyword:

        [mountain bikes]

        will match the search: Seattle Mountain Bikes, if Seattle, WA USA is one of the locations included in the geotargeting.
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  • Profile picture of the author MarkFSimmons
    I would suggest using 2 separate campaigns.

    One that usea geotargeted keywords and is set nationally. The other using non geo targeted keywords and is targeted to people IN Seattle.

    This way you get to leverage both ways of searching but still keep it relative to Seattle. You can set the national campaign to focus on people searching for information about Seattle. Make sense?
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    • Profile picture of the author consultant1027
      Originally Posted by MarkFSimmons View Post

      I would suggest using 2 separate campaigns.

      One that usea geotargeted keywords and is set nationally. The other using non geo targeted keywords and is targeted to people IN Seattle.

      This way you get to leverage both ways of searching but still keep it relative to Seattle. You can set the national campaign to focus on people searching for information about Seattle. Make sense?
      This brings up an interesting question. You are advocating to not use the built-in Campaign Location Intent Geotargeting setting and instead just creating a wide Location based campaign with only keywords with the location names in it.

      But if you notice the wording of the location intent setting, that setting doesn't just match for keywords with the location name in it. It can also match for those keywords on Google 'partner' sites that are centric to the location. I think the best example is one time I traced a conversion that came from Yelp. The location intent was determined on Yelp by the location setting on Yelp, not from the user entering the location name in the search box.

      How many other partner sites does Google geotarget in that way? I don't know but probably not that many as I'd say it's safe to say the vast majority of location intent matches are from the location name being in the search words. Who knows, maybe Yelp automatically, in the background, appends the location name to the search and sends that to Google? If that is how it works, then creating a national location campaign with location name keywords should perform about the same, although you wouldn't get worldwide location intent searches. Some travel/hospitality related companies would probably want a worldwide coveration instead of national.
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      • Profile picture of the author dburk
        Originally Posted by consultant1027 View Post

        This brings up an interesting question. You are advocating to not use the built-in Campaign Location Intent Geotargeting setting and instead just creating a wide Location based campaign with only keywords with the location names in it.

        But if you notice the wording of the location intent setting, that setting doesn't just match for keywords with the location name in it. It can also match for those keywords on Google 'partner' sites that are centric to the location. I think the best example is one time I traced a conversion that came from Yelp. The location intent was determined on Yelp by the location setting on Yelp, not from the user entering the location name in the search box.

        How many other partner sites does Google geotarget in that way? I don't know but probably not that many as I'd say it's safe to say the vast majority of location intent matches are from the location name being in the search words. Who knows, maybe Yelp automatically, in the background, appends the location name to the search and sends that to Google? If that is how it works, then creating a national location campaign with location name keywords should perform about the same, although you wouldn't get worldwide location intent searches. Some travel/hospitality related companies would probably want a worldwide coveration instead of national.
        Hi consultant1027,

        Search Partners do indeed use some "tricks" to serve search ads using unconventional methods. For that reason I try to identify search terms that are Search Partner tricks and add those terms as keywords in a Search Partner Only campaign, this allows me to manage and optimize that Search Partner traffic separate from regular search traffic.

        I agree with MarkFSimmons suggestion to use separate campaigns for local, vs national, or international traffic. Those segments will behave very differently and by placing your location based termed keywords within separate campaigns you have finer control and optimization opportunities.

        As a rule, I do not target location "intent" unless I am promoting a business with a local service, or event, that targets travelers that are expected to visit their location. Outside of that, or similar purposes, location intent traffic is mainly junk traffic and should be completely filtered out in most situations.

        https://support.google.com/adwords/answer/1722038?hl=en
        http://adwords.blogspot.com/2012/04/...-location.html
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  • You sell mountain bikes. You are located in the Seattle area. You have no intention to sell them to people in LA, NY or anywhere else.

    Therefore, create a campaign targeting the Seattle area. Within that campaign, you will have different groups. One is obviously a mountain bike group and I would in this case have the phrase and exact match keywords.

    You may wish to have a group with the keyword "seattle mountain bikes", in the different match types, but in my view and experience, this is not necessary. Few people will likely search that way, at least not for mountain bikes. So it's a question whether it is needed or not and the costs vs the benefits. If nobody searches this way, it's a high cost with no benefits. But do find out either by research or actual data from your campaign.

    As for search partners, Google serves them ads in pretty much the same way they do on their search engine. Every computer has an IP address and that can be resolved to a location. So if you target only people in Seattle, any searches on Yelp, even on "mountain bikes", will be shown only to those in your targeted geography. It's as simple as that. Keep it simple. You don't need to create a national campaign with location keywords, not for a local business. A different story for a hotel. I may search for a hotel in Seattle but currently located in New York.
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    • Profile picture of the author consultant1027
      Originally Posted by LucidWebMarketing View Post

      As for search partners, Google serves them ads in pretty much the same way they do on their search engine. Every computer has an IP address and that can be resolved to a location. So if you target only people in Seattle, any searches on Yelp, even on "mountain bikes", will be shown only to those in your targeted geography. It's as simple as that. Keep it simple. You don't need to create a national campaign with location keywords, not for a local business. A different story for a hotel. I may search for a hotel in Seattle but currently located in New York.
      This is not accurate. A person in San Francisco, CA, who is planning on going on vacation in Seattle, can go to Yelp from their computer in San Francisco, set the location setting to seattle and search for "chinese restaurants" or "mountain bike rentals" for that matter. Their IP resolves to San Francisco, not Seattle, their search term does not have Seattle in it. Yet Google will still server them the ad as Yelp is passing the location seeting along to Google in some way.
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  • Yes, you can set Yelp to show listings from a city other than your own. I don't know however if this affects which ads will be served, if selecting a different city is being "passed on" to the ad server and override the IP. Somehow I doubt it but I've never noticed this.
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