How to get lowest ppc price

by Adamxr 10 replies
Hello everybody
Any ideas, how to get 0.1$ or less ppc ads with High search keyword .
#pay per click/search engine marketing (ppc/sem) #lowest #ppc #price
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  • Profile picture of the author Entre3000
    You can't I'm afraid. PPC by it's nature is a bidding system so if there is more than one person competing for that keyword then you'll always pay 1c less or more than them.

    If theres no one advertising on that keyword then you can.

    If you imagine 3 people bidding on one keyword the person position 1 will pay 3c per click and will be position 1 until someone decides to pay 5c to overtake everyone and then you have your bid war.

    I work with clients who pay around $50 per click and still make bank. Think more about what you're selling not how much you want to bid.
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    • Profile picture of the author PPCDan
      Hey,

      The best way to do that is to have you quality scores between 7-10. The other day I was optimizing my campaign on Google Adwords, and every keyword with a Quality Score of 8 & 9 had a first page bid of $0.15 to $0.40. This is a niche that I specialize in, so I know that just to stay competitive the CPC's are anywhere from $1.50 to $2.50.

      There is no secret. You just have to get your CTR % very high. For those keywords with a Quality Score of 8 and 9 I have a CTR over 10% for every keyword. Most of your competitors will be lazy to focus on ad copy. As long as you keep testing you will get there.

      Good Luck,

      Daniel
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  • Profile picture of the author mathaios
    Originally Posted by Adamxr View Post

    Hello everybody
    Any ideas, how to get 0.1$ or less ppc ads with High search keyword .

    Hey,if you develop your campaign to reach high quality scores and high clickthrough rates ,then you are going to pay near the lowest possible price.But is not the way that will surely make you money.You need to find the right keywords that will bring you money.
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  • As was said, PPC is an auction and thus market driven. There's a reason people in the insurance field for example that are willing to pay tens of dollars for a click. If you are in that industry and want to pay ten cents, then good luck. Not saying it can't happen just that it's unlikely and rare. In that case, to pay that low, bid that low but your ads will show very few times and that just goes against the idea of advertising.

    Don't focus on CPC. That's not the important metric in PPC. Yes, you do want CPC as low as possible for your keywords but to get there, you need to think about CTR which is directly tied to QS. As Dan said, most advertisers are lazy and/or don't understand the system. A little education can save you lots.
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  • Profile picture of the author Marty Foley
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    • Profile picture of the author cooler1
      Originally Posted by Marty Foley View Post

      As others have touched on, much of getting lower CPCs is about getting your CTR up as high as possible. Google, Bing, and some other PPC platforms reward higher CTR keywords and ads with lower average costs per click, and it's important to do what you can to maximize CTR. But when it comes down to it, lower CPCs are not really what really count in the game of PPC.

      Marty Foley ~ ConvertMoreTraffic.Com
      Something I was wondering about the higher CTR resulting in a lower CPC, is that based on the overall CTR of a campaign or is it based on the CTR of each individual keyword?

      So if for example, in a campaign, some keywords have a low CTR and some keywords have a high CTR, will the keywords which have a high CTR be rewarded with a lower CPC or is it based on the overall CTR.
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      • Profile picture of the author Marty Foley
        Originally Posted by cooler1 View Post

        Something I was wondering about the higher CTR resulting in a lower CPC, is that based on the overall CTR of a campaign or is it based on the CTR of each individual keyword?

        So if for example, in a campaign, some keywords have a low CTR and some keywords have a high CTR, will the keywords which have a high CTR be rewarded with a lower CPC or is it based on the overall CTR.
        Lower CPCs are determined on a keyword by keyword basis, based on individual Quality Score (QS). To clarify a bit more:

        * The main (but not only) determinant of QS is CTR.

        * Quality Scores are dynamic, calculated each time a keyword enters into an ad auction.

        * The most important factor related to CTR is relevance.

        * A key to improving relevance is grouping keywords in smaller, tightly focused ad groups, with highly targeted ads which closely match the intent of search engine users.

        * Grouping closely related keywords into smaller focused ad groups makes it easier to write much more relevant and better targeted ads and landing pages.

        * Ad testing is crucial, but CTR is not the best metric to optimize ads for, in most cases. .

        * Google Adwords' recommendation is to use from 5 to 20 keyword terms per ad group. For high traffic keywords it can be advantageous to use as few as one per ad group.

        Marty Foley ~ PPC Traffic & Conversion Mad Scientist
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      • Originally Posted by cooler1 View Post

        Something I was wondering about the higher CTR resulting in a lower CPC, is that based on the overall CTR of a campaign or is it based on the CTR of each individual keyword?

        So if for example, in a campaign, some keywords have a low CTR and some keywords have a high CTR, will the keywords which have a high CTR be rewarded with a lower CPC or is it based on the overall CTR.
        To expand a little bit to make it clearer (although it might not):

        The keyword is not what drives CTR. Your ads do. Searchers don't click on keywords, they click on ads.

        The QS is really the QS of the kw-ad. It wouldn't make sense to do it any other way. So the keyword has a certain CTR with one ad and a totally different CTR with another ad. So when you have two ads (as you should to A/B test), the QS is really the average of that keyword across both ads. It would make more sense to have QS linked to ads but that's how Google does it. Bing shows a QS at the ad group level as well as keyword so that makes more sense.

        Google treats the different match types the same for QS calculations. I suspect it's to save computer cycles or it just makes it easier. This means that the same keyword in broad, phrase and exact matches will always have the same QS in an ad group. If you use different groups for each match type, then you are changing the parameters for each and they may not have the same QS. Many advocate to do this but I don't. The different QS would be an illusion using the same ads.

        QS is calculated in the back-end to many decimal places. You are shown an integer. Your QS may show as 7 but in reality, it could be anywhere between 6.5000000 to 7.4999999 or however many decimals Google uses or between 7.0000000 to 7.9999999 if they simply use the integer portion.

        As Marty said, CTR is the main determinant of QS. In fact, in the early days, there was no QS and Google explicitly said that your ads were ranked based on CTR and bid. It's the same today just that there are a few more variables taken into account which they call QS.

        The CTR used to figure out QS is not your absolute CTR. Adwords is an auction, a competition so in order to assign a QS, it has to be compared to something. That something is the average CTR that all advertisers achieved for that keyword. By definition, a QS of 5 is average. Whatever your CTR is and your QS is 5, it means that your CTR is the same as the historical average. Actually, it may not be the historical (all-time) average but more likely the average for the last little while, maybe the last 1000 searches (a nice round number) on that keyword.

        The QS is normalized to position. As with organic listings, the top position generally has a higher click rate and goes down from there. Same with PPC so your CTR is compared to the historical (whatever that is) average at that position. That's why your QS, with the same ad, won't change. Some say to increase bids to get higher position and get higher (relative) CTR will improve QS but that just isn't so. A better ad will always do better than a poorer ad no matter the position when compared to each other and QS is a reflection of that.

        Your CTR and those of competitors (the historical average) changes after each search. So everyone's QS changes a little bit each time, even those who were not part of a particular auction.

        Finally, QS is used to calculate what you pay should someone click your ad. The basic formula has been published in a video and is CPC = QS(b) x bid(b) / QS(a).

        QS(a) is your QS while QS(b) is that of the competitor's ad (the next ad below you) and his bid. So it's clear that your cost is affected by your QS as well as that of the competitor's and their bid at that time.

        Since everything is in flux - QS, bids and competitors - you will not pay the same for each click. It should however be relatively constant and within a certain range over time. But that assumes a lot. The best way to protect yourself is try to improve QS which means try to increase CTR. Even if CPC doesn't go down despite a higher QS, you are positioning yourself against others and any bid changes they make will have a lesser impact on you.

        And that's all I have to say 'bout that.
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  • Profile picture of the author explorebeads
    Thanks for share this i will also try this its useful more than the other ideas.
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  • Profile picture of the author Engineer2Blogger
    It really depends. Chances are no, not for that price.

    In saying that, I have been able to bring my clicks down from $3.00 to under 80 cents.

    Your quality score has to be 10/10 with a high CTR. That's all it really comes down to.
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  • Profile picture of the author chrisjohn93
    Maintain you ad score to pay as less amount to stay on Google SERP.
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