What does "scaling" Means in PPC/CPA?

6 replies
  • PPC/SEM
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I often read from those who does CPA that they will scale up after they have found a wining campaign? I am new to PPC/CPA and I want to know how exactly do you scale up in a PPC campaign? More keywords? Higher bids? Hope someone can enlighten. Thank you.
#means #ppc or cpa #scaling
  • Profile picture of the author Mastery1
    It means that, once you've found a profitable campaign, you increase the amount of resources you invest in it (money).

    So, let's say you invest $100 in ads and you have a positive ROI, you start investing more (lets say $300) in ads to earn more money from the campaing.
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  • Profile picture of the author Bright Future
    First you should check if your daily budget is big enough. If it often runs out before the end of the day then the easiest way for you to start scaling would be just to increase the budget limit.

    But there are also many other ways you can scale:

    You already mentioned:
    - adding keywords;
    - raising bids.

    Additional ideas:
    - improving CTR;
    - expanding geographically;
    - expanding language targeting;
    - adding other match types of the same keywords;
    - making sure you use accelerated delivery;
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    • Profile picture of the author freeabs
      Originally Posted by Bright Future View Post

      First you should check if your daily budget is big enough. If it often runs out before the end of the day then the easiest way for you to start scaling would be just to increase the budget limit.

      But there are also many other ways you can scale:

      You already mentioned:
      - adding keywords;
      - raising bids.

      Additional ideas:
      - improving CTR;
      - expanding geographically;
      - expanding language targeting;
      - adding other match types of the same keywords;
      - making sure you use accelerated delivery;
      Thks for the info. So say for example if I am on a $10 budget per day initially and found a winning campaign that got 20 clicks. I then scale up by abandoning the losing ones and just concentrate on the one or two winning ones. If I increase my budget to say, $100, I will get about 200 clicks then? Sorry for the noob question, but I am trying to wrap my stubborn head around this scaling thing. Thanks again.
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      • Profile picture of the author Bright Future
        Originally Posted by freeabs View Post

        Thks for the info. So say for example if I am on a $10 budget per day initially and found a winning campaign that got 20 clicks. I then scale up by abandoning the losing ones and just concentrate on the one or two winning ones. If I increase my budget to say, $100, I will get about 200 clicks then? Sorry for the noob question, but I am trying to wrap my stubborn head around this scaling thing. Thanks again.
        Increasing your budget by itself can only help if it's not big enough in the first place, like LucidWebMarketing already pointed out. For example, in AdWords and Bing there's a metric called impression share and you can check how much of it has been lost due to insufficient budget. If your impression share is already high (aim for >90%) then increasing your daily limit won't do much.
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  • Scaling usually means to increase production. For example, if I manufacture windshield wipers for cars that I sell mostly to car manufacturers, I will scale up production - if that's possible - if they order more. It makes sense since the more I sell, the more profits I make. But it would not make sense to scale up and produce more if I'm not selling them.

    As to what someone means by scaling when talking about a PPC campaign, I never really figured out. If you do things correctly from the start, there's little you can usually do about adding new keywords. So I guess they are mostly talking about increasing the budget. But that makes sense only if you are not reaching all the searchers on your keywords in the first place. If your $10 is not being spent because there's only a certain number of searchers, increasing it won't do a thing, certainly not get ten times the clicks if you increase the budget tenfold. I always recommend that, when you know the numbers (impressions, CTR, CPC, etc), set your budget to get 100% share of the impressions. I typically know these numbers before the campaign starts so I don't have to "scale" up, simply improve the campaign.
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  • Profile picture of the author ziyapathan
    Operating the business at scale means allocating and optimizing resources to drive the greatest results and volume across market segments. Are marketing and sales working together to generate demand and close business? Are closed deals being transitioned to services/support to be nurtured?
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