Too late to learn programming?

by linord
36 replies
Hey guys, I am a 24 year old female with absolutely zero knowledge on anything about programming. However, I want to learn PHP since coding is one of the most valuable assets in the workforce today. Is it too late for me to learn from scratch?

If not, how do I start learning how to program? Do you guys have any good references or recources for me? Thank you!
#late #learn #programming
Avatar of Unregistered
  • Profile picture of the author Chris30K
    If I were you, I'd start with Python. If you want to get some keen fundamentals on programming, go to:

    1. EDX.Org and check out David J. Malan's CS50 Course taught at Harvard
    2. Learn Introduction to Computer Science and Programming Using Python. (both free unless you want the official certification)

    For reasons why you should do Python before PHP, here's some reasons: https://www.quora.com/Which-is-better-PHP-or-Python-Why
    Signature

    Chic Fil A > McDonald's

    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[11369425].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author yukon
    Banned
    Originally Posted by linord View Post

    Hey guys, I am a 24 year old female with absolutely zero knowledge on anything about programming. However, I want to learn PHP since coding is one of the most valuable assets in the workforce today. Is it too late for me to learn from scratch?

    If not, how do I start learning how to program? Do you guys have any good references or recources for me? Thank you!


    You're young, that's at least another 40 years worth of time for a career.
    Signature
    Hi
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[11369583].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author ctrlaltdelete
    24 years old is still young, you know. Some people still go to school in their sixties and seventies. So go ahead and learn programming. It's a useful skill to have and pays well.

    Now, as I'm no programmer, I can't exactly recommend which language you should start with, but being versatile and knowing more than one language impresses a lot of would-be employers. But a specialist in one can land big money too, so it's up to you to decide, really.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[11371101].message }}
    • Profile picture of the author linord
      Thanks! I was just hesitant to learn because my ex is a programmer and he told me that 24 is too old to be a good programmer already
      {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[11371117].message }}
      • Profile picture of the author yukon
        Banned
        Originally Posted by linord View Post

        Thanks! I was just hesitant to learn because my ex is a programmer and he told me that 24 is too old to be a good programmer already

        Make sure he stays an ex.

        Don't let other people hold you back.

        Seriously, 24 is very young for starting a new career.
        Signature
        Hi
        {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[11371489].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author yukon
    Banned
    The best thing to do is figure out what you want to do longterm on your own.

    Example, learn how to code Wordpress themes (PHP, MySQL, etc...).

    Educate yourself and get a job that requires these same skills and then build your own business on the side while the job is paying a steady paycheck. Aim to double your job income with the side business and you'll be in a good place to do whatever you want on your own.

    There's big money in Wordpress themes and it's in demand all over the world. I see estimates ranging between 25 - 30% of the web powered by Wordpress, that's HUGE.

    Some theme design shops let you do remote work meaning If you're good you can get a steady paycheck coding themes front and backend and again, live anywhere in the world.

    Even If you didn't want to work with Wordpress, both PHP and MySQL are still popular on other CMS/platforms.

    My point is, try and look for something that applies to multiple niches and has been around for years.
    Signature
    Hi
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[11371107].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author Voivode
    Here's an 81 year old in Japan who's making a name for herself developing apps. She can do it, so can you. Don't let anyone tell you otherwise.


    https://thenextweb.com/shareables/20...d-woman-japan/
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[11371665].message }}
    • Profile picture of the author linord
      Nice!! This is so motivating. But I suppose making apps is another programming language aside from PHP or Python.

      I would love to make my own app too once I get started. I already have an idea for an app in mind.
      {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[11371827].message }}
      • Profile picture of the author dilipcybex
        Originally Posted by linord View Post

        Nice!! This is so motivating. But I suppose making apps is another programming language aside from PHP or Python.

        I would love to make my own app too once I get started. I already have an idea for an app in mind.

        There are tools like Ionic Framework which lets you make apps using web technologies. Learning Java is not difficult either.
        {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[11371851].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author dilipcybex
    You can start with HTML and CSS and then move to PHP. HTML and CSS are very easy and you can learn it under a month. Once you know the basics, take an online course or an ebook to learn PHP.


    As long as you like to learn and is smart enough with some brain power, PHP is not a hard nut to crack.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[11371850].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author swsalim
    If you're new to programming, I think starting with reading up on some basic HTML and CSS is a good start. After that, you could move on to Javascript before jumping to PHP.

    Having a basic knowledge of HTML, CSS and Javascript will let you understand better how a website works.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[11372721].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author bgotti
    It depends what you want to do. For instance, if you want to learn front-end learn: HTML, CSS, JavaScript.
    or/and back end learn: PHP, Python, Ruby, etc.
    or another options is both (full-stack developer).

    Bonus: Learn database (Microsoft SQL Server, MySQL, etc.)
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[11378627].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author tweeden
    I am 45 years young and I started programming at 40. I program in a few languages. PHP, Javascript, and C#. I build apps and websites for an international marketing firm. It never too late. Just believe in yourself. I recommend starting with HTML5 and CSS3. Before choosing a language. Because those are the foundation and with that knowledge, you will struggle with learning a scripting or object-oriented language. If you decide to go forward with this journey let me tell you it is rewarding.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[11379808].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author stephenhenbie
    Its never too Late. I'm 56 and I'm actually going back to school to learn programming. Go For It.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[11380051].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author harvey singh
    learn html css 2 week javascript 1 month and jquery one month then learn wordpress take hardly two weeks within 3 month you will be able to showcase your skills and save all your work on github try to make profile on linkdin and get in touch with recruiter and now its time to start apply for job and meanwhile try to learn php within 6 month you will get a decent job and your life will be chage forever. All the best
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[11381432].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author Polanki
    It is easy to start your career by getting trained in programming courses like linux, python and so on.
    Linux is also easy programming language. To learn about python and linux, visit here:
    1.Linux online training in kurnool.
    2. Python online training
    All the best for your future and career...
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[11385990].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author patrickvfisher
    it's never been to late to start !
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[11386044].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author romon132
    No, it's never, ever too late. I'm writing this answer because so many other replies, especially from "career programmers", just have no clue.

    After spending 5 years in a sales, marketing, and business strategy career, I started programming a few months before my 19 the birthday (the reason is an entirely unrelated story). I'm now 20.

    I taught myself to program by reading a code, code documentation, and code comments on GitHub. After I learned the basics I started reading books to deepen my knowledge. But what helped me learn quickly was this: I tried to find existing code projects that seemed really interesting, so that I could find something to aspire to. I then started looking for "code challenges" that I could do, with a goal of accomplishing one challenge a day (when feasible).

    I had no idea where to start, and everything was completely new to me, so at first, my goals were based on things I was reading in documentation in projects, or on MDN's javascript docs, like "Learn how variables work", or "Learn how objects work", and so on.

    Then the goals turned into things like "Learn the difference between an array and an object", etc. Anything that could help me understand the basics of programming, one step at a time. As time went on, the goals became more advanced, and I started focusing on giving myself code challenges that would result in a small, publishable code project that could be used in future code projects.

    Over time the code quality improved, and the code projects became more sophisticated. But the important takeaway is that I did this one step at a time, one day at a time. Some days I spent 30 min reading about code and trying to create something, other days - especially weekends - I spent hours. The more I learned, the more I enjoyed it (I won't lie, it was often very boring or frustratingly confusing in the beginning).

    Here is the interesting part. Given my background and experience in marketing, from the very first project I published on GitHub, I started looking for ways to watch usage or download statistics on my projects. For the first 6 months or so, I didn't create anything of value, hence no one paid any attention to my projects at all. Why would they? One day I noticed that one of my projects started getting downloaded, it was a strangely exciting moment (another programmer is using something I created?!? wow). This was important to me, especially after spending years in sales and marketing, because "you can't manage what you can't measure", and downloads were the only metric I knew of that could tell me (as a programmer) that I was providing value.

    With the help of a friend, we created a very simple "report card" that would give me a daily update/summary of how many downloads my projects were getting. By virtue of the laws of cause and effect, I just started spending more time on the projects people cared about, and less time on the ones that people didn't care about. No brainer, right? Again, there was a goal - something I wanted to accomplish, and a reason I started programming, but that's not related to this.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[11386059].message }}
  • There is no age of learning if you have desire of doing anything than no one matters whether it is knowledge or age. You can start learning from YouTube or you can also join any good institute.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[11390377].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author Thomas Turner
    wow looking at theses posts it dose seem it isn't never too late!
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[11392540].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author blues1143
    Have a project in mind. I started at 22 with no prior knowledge and currently have 2 apps (one in Android, 1 cross platform iOS and Android)
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[11398949].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author kursat
    I started learning about programming when I was 36 and graphic design at 40!

    So you are very young to start anything in your life. Make sure you pick something you would love and the learning will be much easier. All the best.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[11398962].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author Rob Hunsons
    I advise you first to study front end before going deep into back end. And it's never too late to begin.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[11401689].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author ryanbiddulph
    I am a 24 year old female.....

    You have a good 50 years. Even then, you may have more

    I recall a dude from months back who bought a bunch of my eBooks. He had just learned about blogging and dove in full bore. He is 73 years old.

    Time is the ultimate illusion. So late does not exist, and you are in the perfect place and moment to start.

    Dive right in. 24 or 74, all that matters is following your passion, acquiring knowledge and enjoying the ride as you help folks with your budding programming skills.

    Ryan
    Signature
    Ryan Biddulph, Blogger, Author, World Traveling Digital Nomad
    If you want to become a full time blogger you can buy my eBook here
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[11401722].message }}
    • Profile picture of the author msalvija
      Hello friends i am 29 year old i started java, php, wordpress and recently i have made website - www.turbonuoma.lt ....please share your ideas that how can i improve it to look and feel better......
      {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[11401725].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author bobreedd
    I believe that it's never too late to learn. I have an acquaintance who started programming training at 35. So you are still young enough. I wish you good luck in this field.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[11402899].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author codingku
    I suggest you learn java, it easy, lots of documentations and cross platforms
    Signature

    My Games: Stick Fight
    - Bruce Lee

    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[11403055].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author PeterPa
    Im a php programmer, but I really would not have chosen that if I should learn my first language today. Consider javascript (since it is good to combine with your knowledge in html) or Python (since it is awesome, and a really good first language)
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[11405526].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author vasskachk
    24 in my opinion this is an excellent age for accomplishing feats and in order to try something new. But first, I would learn the basics of testing. But if you are full of energy and enthusiasm - go for it!
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[11414248].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author jackmo120
    I started building Discord websites for friends and family Adobe Reader , even if they didn't really need them! Hart said. "I was just desperate to hone my iTunes skills.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[11417137].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author YYDevelop
    It's never to late. It's true that getting experience take time but with today so many sources of learning it much easier to learn than it use to be in the past.
    You should probably start learning HTML & CSS and when it's done try learn PHP.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[11418326].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author mgrokhotov
    Hi!
    24 it's just beginning. I khow very good front-end developer, she started at 29 with CSS and HTML, now she using webpack, preprocessors and jQuery (two years after start).
    Try with coursera or udemy courses. Also, i like CS50 course, very good for start.
    Good luck!
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[11419198].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author brettb
    I started at 24 then spent 20 years as a commercial developer.


    Learn server side programming. Python is very much in demand now, but just go to itjobswatch to see what else is hot.
    Signature
    Need LSI Keywords? Try the Niche Laboratory keyword tool (affiliates info page here).

    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[11421288].message }}
Avatar of Unregistered

Trending Topics