Why Your 4400 Searches/Month Keyword Site On Page 1 Only Gets 7 Visitors/Day

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What could be more discouraging than this scenario:

After soaking up some of the knowledge & experience on the forum, you diligently set to work on starting your day-job-busting IM career.

You apply what you've learned about exploring niche's and keyword research, spend hours pounding Wordtracker and Google's Keyword Tool, generating keywords lists, checking the 'competition', and finally settled on that 'gold nugget' you found: 4400 searches per month, not too much 'competition', and a Page 1 SERP that looks achievable.

You set up a Wordpress blog on your Hostgator account, write 10 pages of good, original, unique content along with Adsense or a high-gravity Clickbank product.

You've learned you need backlinks to break into that Page 1 SERP, so you start submitting articles to Ezinearticles and Goarticles, buy a WSO of places to get high-PR backlinks, download Onlywire and start posting to Social Bookmarking sites, Digg'ing your pages, etc.

Then you sit back and wait. Shortly after your site gets indexed, you find yourself at #22 and start to get excited.

A few days later, you're off the radar, but you've heard about the "Google Dance", so you submit some more articles, do more backlinks & SB submissions, and wait.

Finally, FINALLY, the day comes when you've done it - Not only are you on the first page, you're #6!

You start checking your stats. Not much happening, but you figure, it's only just gotten there.

The next day, not much.

A few weeks later, and it dawns on you that you aren't going to see more than a handful of visitors. Period.

What happened?

First, unless you run an Adwords campaign targeting your chosen keyword/phrase with a highest bid and big enough daily budget to show impressions for every search, you have no firm, reliable way to know if that "4400" number is accurate.

It came from Google? So what. At best it's close. As often as not, it isn't even terribly close.

And did that number show for "Broad Match"? That doesn't apply to you. "Exact Match" is what you want.

Next, did you do a "reality check" on Google's number? Use Wordtracker's free tool and SEOBook's free tool. Are they all in the same ballpark at least?

Ok, now lets do the math:

4400 searches per month equals approximately 150 searches per day.

Of that, the top listing gets the largest percent, and the top 3 get between 2/3 and 3/4.

That leaves between 37 and 50 searches per day divided among the remaining top 7.

And with each drop, the percentage decreases.

Realistically, even if you divide whats left evenly among the remaining top 7, you're talking about 7 searches per day each.

Keep in mind as well that depending on the type of search query, the top spot may get as much as 75% of the clicks.


If you want much in the way of organic search traffic, you want to be targeting a reasonably high total daily search volume, like a few relatively high volume keywords, or many lower-volume keywords,

Or, you need to get to the Top 3 listings,

Or, you need to systematize your efforts, and multiply them with many sites.


Mark
#4400 #keyword #page #searches or month #site #visitors or day
  • Profile picture of the author Sowemimo Oladele
    Originally Posted by internetmarketer99 View Post

    What could be more discouraging than this scenario:

    After soaking up some of the knowledge & experience on the forum, you diligently set to work on starting your day-job-busting IM career.

    You apply what you've learned about exploring niche's and keyword research, spend hours pounding Wordtracker and Google's Keyword Tool, generating keywords lists, checking the 'competition', and finally settled on that 'gold nugget' you found: 4400 searches per month, not too much 'competition', and a Page 1 SERP that looks achievable.

    You set up a Wordpress blog on your Hostgator account, write 10 pages of good, original, unique content along with Adsense or a high-gravity Clickbank product.

    You've learned you need backlinks to break into that Page 1 SERP, so you start submitting articles to Ezinearticles and Goarticles, buy a WSO of places to get high-PR backlinks, download Onlywire and start posting to Social Bookmarking sites, Digg'ing your pages, etc.

    Then you sit back and wait. Shortly after your site gets indexed, you find yourself at #22 and start to get excited.

    A few days later, you're off the radar, but you've heard about the "Google Dance", so you submit some more articles, do more backlinks & SB submissions, and wait.

    Finally, FINALLY, the day comes when you've done it - Not only are you on the first page, you're #6!

    You start checking your stats. Not much happening, but you figure, it's only just gotten there.

    The next day, not much.

    A few weeks later, and it dawns on you that you aren't going to see more than a handful of visitors. Period.

    What happened?

    First, unless you run an Adwords campaign targeting your chosen keyword/phrase with a highest bid and big enough daily budget to show impressions for every search, you have no firm, reliable way to know if that "4400" number is accurate.

    It came from Google? So what. At best it's close. As often as not, it isn't even terribly close.

    And did that number show for "Broad Match"? That doesn't apply to you. "Exact Match" is what you want.

    Next, did you do a "reality check" on Google's number? Use Wordtracker's free tool and SEOBook's free tool. Are they all in the same ballpark at least?

    Ok, now lets do the math:

    4400 searches per month equals approximately 150 searches per day.

    Of that, the top listing gets the largest percent, and the top 3 get between 2/3 and 3/4.

    That leaves between 37 and 50 searches per day divided among the remaining top 7.

    And with each drop, the percentage decreases.

    Realistically, even if you divide whats left evenly among the remaining top 7, you're talking about 7 searches per day each.

    Keep in mind as well that depending on the type of search query, the top spot may get as much as 75% of the clicks.


    If you want much in the way of organic search traffic, you want to be targeting a reasonably high total daily search volume, like a few relatively high volume keywords, or many lower-volume keywords,

    Or, you need to get to the Top 3 listings,

    Or, you need to systematize your efforts, and multiply them with many sites.


    Mark

    Good analysis Mark,

    This is exactly what's happening to one of my affiliate site. seated @ no. 5 google 1st page with 3800 searches per month but only getting an average of 10 unique visitors per day....

    What do you suggest in this case....??
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    I just want to be rich and famous....!!!

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    • Originally Posted by Sowemimo Oladele View Post

      Good analysis Mark,

      This is exactly what's happening to one of my affiliate site. seated @ no. 5 google 1st page with 3800 searches per month but only getting an average of 10 unique visitors per day....

      What do you suggest in this case....??
      As per the OP and as Lucid mentioned above, what you're seeing isn't too far off for those numbers.

      The point I was trying to make was, if you're working at targeting relatively low-volume terms, under 10-15k, you want to a) get in the top 3 positions, and b) target more terms.

      Mark
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  • Profile picture of the author Lucid
    You are making false assumptions.

    > Of that, the top listing gets the largest percent, and the top 3 get between 2/3 and 3/4
    It's not quite that high. Here's a link to some data from a couple of years ago.

    SERP Click Through Rate of Google Search Results – AOL-data.tgz – Want to Know How Many Clicks The #1 Google Position Gets? - Red Cardinal

    That first position click rate sounds somewhat high to me and the sharp drop-off for the second spot, but who am I to argue. I do have the data so I can run my own analysis.


    > That leaves between 37 and 50 searches per day divided among the remaining top 7.
    Clicks are not "divided" among the rest of the page because people don't work that way. Of those who click, some will click on one listing, others on two, three, four or more. And not necessarily the top four. They could click on the second, then the fifth and the sixth.

    The volume for your keywords is not that important really. What's important is to maximize your click rate. Like PPC, your listing has to be appealing for people to do so.

    Your final assumption is assuming that there was 4400 searches on your keyword this past month. Either you compare with an Adwords campaign or check the keyword tool the following month. The numbers are accurate.

    Assuming there was that many searches, and assuming your position is always sixth for everybody (which probably doesn't happen), and assuming your listing is maximized for click throughs (probably not), your click rate at that position might be 4%. But my guess is that you probably get only 1% which would be more typical. That gives you 44 visitors per month.

    Sowemino's numbers sound pretty good. He's getting a close to 8% click rate, assuming his 3800 searches are fairly accurate.
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  • Profile picture of the author Kappa
    I would say having been in that position it is extremely important to rank #1. I don't see how you could rank #2, get that 10% CTR, have a 1% conversion, and still make more than a sale a week.
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  • Profile picture of the author jabnamedia
    Lucid makes some good points about search habits. If I am looking for information on a topic and the first entry I click on doesn't answer all my questions I will return to the search results and try another one. I will normally click on at least three of the results before ending my search or choosing new keywords to search.
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  • Profile picture of the author SRLee
    Hello Mark, thanks for this informative post!

    However, I have one question directly related to this topic.

    Let's say I have made my research and I discovered that "Keyword-A" has an average of 200 Exact searches per day based on Google's keyword tool.

    I cross-checked with Wordtracker, and I got 100 Exact searches per day. Is it safe to assume that this keyword has an average of 150 Exact searches per day?
    All numbers are made up and can not be verified with any tools

    Thanks!
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  • Profile picture of the author Lucid
    This thread has made me look at the data more closely, something I wanted to do for a while.

    First, more than 20% of people type in the domain in their browsers. I knew about this but did not realize it was so high. Obviously, there are a lot of people who don't know how to user their browsers. Probably set to open a search engine and they think you enter the URL in the search box or simply make a mistake. Of course, 99% of the time the site comes up first and they click on it. I'm going to remove those and see how that affects real searches.

    Second, it's not clear if they are counted multiple times or not in the research, I suspect not, but a lot of people click many times on the same listing. I found one who clicked 141 times during the same session. Of course, this may just have been some bug in the program.

    SRLee, to answer your question, use Google's keyword tool. It is accurate as I've compared its numbers to actual Adwords data and they match.
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    • Profile picture of the author SRLee
      Originally Posted by Lucid View Post

      SRLee, to answer your question, use Google's keyword tool. It is accurate as I've compared its numbers to actual Adwords data and they match.
      As accurate as it will ever be.

      Thanks!
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  • Profile picture of the author Lucid
    OK, here's more accurate numbers when you remove "junk" searches such as typing the domain in the search box. This represents over 2.7 million searches of which there was 1.6 million clicks (59.4% of searches produced one or more clicks):

    Position Percentage

    1 26.92
    2 6.64
    3 4.53
    4 3.17
    5 2.57
    6 2.17
    7 1.92
    8 1.85
    9 1.91
    10 2.41

    To me, these are more realistic numbers although I still find the top position high. When I compare this to PPC data, except for the first position, good ads beat organic's click rates and the drop-off for each position is not as pronounced. The fifth position in PPC typically gets half the click rate than the first position. Organic results show one third from second to sixth place.
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    • Profile picture of the author Seekness
      Originally Posted by Lucid View Post

      OK, here's more accurate numbers when you remove "junk" searches such as typing the domain in the search box. This represents over 2.7 million searches of which there was 1.6 million clicks (59.4% of searches produced one or more clicks):

      Position Percentage

      1 26.92
      2 6.64
      3 4.53
      4 3.17
      5 2.57
      6 2.17
      7 1.92
      8 1.85
      9 1.91
      10 2.41

      To me, these are more realistic numbers although I still find the top position high. When I compare this to PPC data, except for the first position, good ads beat organic's click rates and the drop-off for each position is not as pronounced. The fifth position in PPC typically gets half the click rate than the first position. Organic results show one third from second to sixth place.
      If you add up the numbers in your top 10 listing, this analysis assumes that only 54% or so of the clicks from these searches were on first page listings. That'd imply that 46% of clicks occur on second page listings or deeper, which is next to impossible given all of the other data out there that contradicts this. Are you implying that 40% of people who search end up clicking on no results? Is there something I missed?
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    • Profile picture of the author timpears
      Originally Posted by Lucid View Post

      OK, here's more accurate numbers when you remove "junk" searches such as typing the domain in the search box. This represents over 2.7 million searches of which there was 1.6 million clicks (59.4% of searches produced one or more clicks):
      I am not following what you are trying to say. As I read it, you seem to be saying that out of the search results for a keyword, if you take out the results for the times that someone typed in a domain, which I know they do as I have seen my wife do it numerous times. I have never understood that. But if they typed in the domain, then that would not turn up in the results for the keyword, as the domain and the keyword are different searches.

      I don't follow your logic.

      My thinking is that if you are not going to go after key words with decent search results, then why rae you bothering? Unless you are seeing three hundred a day or more, the volume is not enough to generate much unless you get real lucky. The best you can do is about 45% of that number if you manage to get the top spot.

      If you are going to work at ranking your site, then you might just as well go after search traffic of close to five hundred a day and spend a little more time getting back links.

      Of course, I am not getting paid for my thinking, so I may be all wet. I am not getting rich at this game, yet. But that is my thinking for what it is worth.
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  • Profile picture of the author Lucid
    IM99 is right. You want as high a position as you can get of course, we all do. The volume is not important. It's the quality of the keyword. The longer tails, while less volume, convert better.

    As he also says, there are other keywords you can likely target. Not necessarily using SEO, there's also PPC.

    Kappa said:
    > I don't see how you could rank #2, get that 10% CTR, have a 1% conversion, and
    > still make more than a sale a week.

    So you are saying your keyword gets searched for 1000 times a week. But if it was searched for 10k times, you'd make 10 sales. If you improved your conversion rate say to 2%, you'd double your sales.

    I understand that if the item sells for $20, that won't make you rich. But if you sell 50 different products, even selling only one of each every week, then you are making a good living. Or in my case, targeting Google Adwords management which is searched for less than 2000 times a month, when one sale has the potential of generating hundreds or even thousands in revenues, it's well worth it.
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  • Profile picture of the author informom09
    Thanks for all of the information. I get more calls on this subject and now have a little more knowledge to help.
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  • Profile picture of the author Gill A Taylor
    I've definitely also had this eye opener recently. This makes me wonder if it's even worth it to target say 1000 search/month keyword phrases?

    I'm using article marketing as the main traffic generator, so if one gets about 10-20% ctr through the article directory it starts getting a little tough.

    Example:
    1300 searches x 4.53% (google 3rd place) x 15% (from article directory) = 8.83 visits a month.

    My guess is that I'm not getting rich from 8 people and a midget a month anytime soon.
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    • Originally Posted by Gill A Taylor View Post


      Example:
      1300 searches x 4.53% (google 3rd place) x 15% (from article directory) = 8.83 visits a month.

      My guess is that I'm not getting rich from 8 people and a midget a month anytime soon.
      Not in this lifetime, not unless you're pitching a product with a $10k commission. That, or one of the .83's is so happy with his "Dating For Midgets" Clickbank book that he leaves you his inheritance.

      Thanks for a good laugh!

      Mark
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  • Profile picture of the author Lucid
    > This makes me wonder if it's even worth it to target say 1000 search/month keyword phrases?

    What are the chances you'll get high ranking for one million searches/month keywords? It will be much tougher and most people will never get there.

    Target other similar keywords. If one gets 3000 searches and another 4000, your 8.83 visitors could become 47 and a half guy.

    And of course, there's PPC to target all those other words you don't or can't rank organically for.
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  • Profile picture of the author Zach Booker
    EDIT: I didn't read the reply's and the OP post all the way through. So I was just repeating what other s have said.

    Whoops

    Awesome, and very, very, true thread though!

    Zach
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  • Profile picture of the author Liquidgraph
    Guys, you're missing the KEY factor -- canvas an entire niche. A single keyword, no matter how large the volume, will never be your main source of traffic. Don't target 1 keyword, or 5 keywords, target 100 keywords that receive at least 500+ searches. But, even though you rank in top 5-10 for many of them, most traffic comes from super long-tail phrases. That's the "broad" traffic in Google Keyword Tool. Sum all that together and you easily get 100,000-400,000 monthly searches. Of course, this is serious SEO, not piddly article marketing.
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    • Profile picture of the author Gill A Taylor
      Originally Posted by Liquidgraph View Post

      Guys, you're missing the KEY factor -- canvas an entire niche. A single keyword, no matter how large the volume, will never be your main source of traffic. Don't target 1 keyword, or 5 keywords, target 100 keywords that receive at least 500+ searches. But, even though you rank in top 5-10 for many of them, most traffic comes from super long-tail phrases. That's the "broad" traffic in Google Keyword Tool. Sum all that together and you easily get 100,000-400,000 monthly searches. Of course, this is serious SEO, not piddly article marketing.
      What exactly do you mean by serious SEO? Are you suggesting optimizing your website for all these keyword phrases.

      My site has all the articles i write as individual pages and my ezine articles always way outrank them. However, for me to to even get 10 000 visitors, not searches buts site visits, seems like a incredible endeavor. Even if I optimise my article for say 4 or 5 keywords, ranging in searches from say 300 to 20 000, I would have to write on a semi full time basis to get those kind of results.

      And another thing, by the time i get a few articles ahead, my other articles have slipped from the SERPs. Maybe because I'm not yet proficient at building backinks.

      If you have any ideas that would be great.
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    • Originally Posted by Liquidgraph View Post

      Guys, you're missing the KEY factor -- canvas an entire niche. A single keyword, no matter how large the volume, will never be your main source of traffic. Don't target 1 keyword, or 5 keywords, target 100 keywords that receive at least 500+ searches. But, even though you rank in top 5-10 for many of them, most traffic comes from super long-tail phrases. That's the "broad" traffic in Google Keyword Tool. Sum all that together and you easily get 100,000-400,000 monthly searches. Of course, this is serious SEO, not piddly article marketing.
      That's non-sense. "Serious SEO" targets 1 keyword/phrase per page. And article marketing is a valid and effective strategy of "serious SEO".

      An experienced, "serious SEO" knows you don't target 100 keywords unless you can target each one with a title, H1 tag, etc.

      Mark
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  • Profile picture of the author Goatboy
    Originally Posted by internetmarketer99 View Post

    4400 searches per month equals approximately 150 searches per day.

    Of that, the top listing gets the largest percent, and the top 3 get between 2/3 and 3/4.

    That leaves between 37 and 50 searches per day divided among the remaining top 7.

    And with each drop, the percentage decreases.

    Realistically, even if you divide whats left evenly among the remaining top 7, you're talking about 7 searches per day each.

    Keep in mind as well that depending on the type of search query, the top spot may get as much as 75% of the clicks.


    If you want much in the way of organic search traffic, you want to be targeting a reasonably high total daily search volume, like a few relatively high volume keywords, or many lower-volume keywords,

    Or, you need to get to the Top 3 listings,

    Or, you need to systematize your efforts, and multiply them with many sites.


    Mark
    Holy cow! I'm stuck at #112 and I'm getting about 7 to 10 uniques per day. That means the top folks must be getting closer to 100 visits or maybe even more. Looks like it's time for me to build some more backlinks.
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  • Profile picture of the author Lucid
    Dandee, it's something you missed.

    It's not a percentage of the number of clicks that is represented. It's the percentage each position was clicked on.

    If someone clicks on the first result, that position would get one click. So would the fourth and fifth if they clicked on it. One search but three clicks. Percentage of times search resulted in a click: 100%. Percentage on first, fourth and fifth listings: 100%. Percentage on all other listings: 0%.

    Using your logic, for this one search, it adds up that 300% of people clicked on one of the top ten listings. That's obviously not the case.

    If he also clicked on the 12th listing on the second page, that position would show 100%. In this case, he clicked on listings on the first and second page. But of course, you can't say that 100% of people click on results on the first page as well as the second. Note too that not everybody sets Google to show only ten results although my guess is that 95% probably leave that setting at the default of ten.

    As I said above, 59.4% of searches result in clicks. Meaning 40.6% of people don't click on any listing at all.

    Timpears, yes, I took out all searches I considered junk. I wanted to see results of "real" searches. As I suspected, many search on a domain and naturally click on that domain's listing. That's not a real search, it's just ignorance of how to use your browser.

    So, I took out all those types of searches from the database. I also removed lots of weird looking searches (who searches for a dash or the letter g?). There was also many searches of non-words such as "p; .; p;' p; ' ;' ;';". I suspect this is a non-Latin character search like Chinese. There may be a valid reason for those searching on a dash as many show they actually clicked on results. But I removed them to keep the data as clean as possible.

    Liquidgraph is right. It's harder obviously to rank well for a 2-word keyword. Easier for longer tailed. Sure the shorter tail gets more searches. But it's your longer tail that converts better. It's simply more relevant.

    Goatboy, you are #112 for, I assume, one keyword you check. Are your 10 uniques a day searching on that same keyword? Probably not. Look at your log files and see what keywords where used. I'm guessing most are using other keywords for which you rank much higher and that you had no idea you were ranking high for.
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  • Profile picture of the author nRehman
    Very true, thanks for highlighting the fact.
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  • Profile picture of the author BrightLife
    Hi Mark,

    I can only underline everything you said. My experiences with about 15 sites and their AWstats are telling exactly what you are saying and it is even worse. My sites that were chosen for niche keywords with around 5.000 searches and which are now ranking on page #1 or #2 of Google have more or less the same traffic that my other sites have ranking much lower. And the UV count is more or less 5-7 p.d. normally over the months. Period.
    I fear that this whole niche market hunting was a myth from the start and a whole course industry is supporting it to this very day. Over all this technical SEO stuff that is needed for ranking high I completely forgot the main aim: To sell, to make money.
    Now as I am ranking high for myself and miss sells I start to think, and now I am stumbling over Mark´s formula here which seems so true compared to my own "real life experience" that I can not understand why I haven´t seen it from the start.
    Be warned:
    You will not find the Holy Grail in niches. If you will still go for organic searching make yourself ready to face the full battle in broader markets with competitive keywords and much stronger competition. And make plans for a much longer time to fight for it. Or be sufficient with a spontaneous sale now and then.
    Just my 2 cents.

    Brightlife

    P.S.: Hi Mark, I just found an "older" thread of yours where you explained how to earn 100$ a day with Adsense - with 5.000 searches a month. What has changed your mind? -
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    • Originally Posted by BrightLife View Post


      Be warned:
      You will not find the Holy Grail in niches. If you will still go for organic searching make yourself ready to face the full battle in broader markets with competitive keywords and much stronger competition. And make plans for a much longer battle. Or be sufficient with a spontaneous sale now and then.
      Just my 2 cents.

      Brightlife

      P.S.: Hi Mark, I just found an "older" thread of yours where you explained how to earn 100$ a day with Adsense - with 5.000 searches a month. What has changed your mind? -
      Brightlife,

      My point wasn't so much that niche marketing doesn't work - it absolutely does - but rather to understand the numbers. Too many people have gotten the impression that (for example) 4400 searches means that any Page 1 listing will result in a lot of traffic. It can, but only if you reach the top 3.

      The 'lesson' is, do your homework. If the top few sites aren't assailable, than either combine multiple "4400" keyword phrases, or find ones for which you can reach those top spots.

      As for my Adsense thread, that's actually a somewhat different approach - going after some 'tougher' niches, but finding the 'attainable' keyword phrases, and applying a stronger, more concerted backlinking effort.

      Mark
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  • Profile picture of the author oleic23
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    • Profile picture of the author JoeCool
      First, unless you run an Adwords campaign targeting your chosen keyword/phrase with a highest bid and big enough daily budget to show impressions for every search, you have no firm, reliable way to know if that "4400" number is accurate.
      Actually, this is wrong information on how to go about verifying impressions against Google's Keyword Tool search count.

      If you want to run an AdWords test campaign to verify the number of impressions, you only need to bid high enough to be on page 1 of the search results.

      So, if position 1's bid price is $2.50 and position 7's is only .15, you only need to bid .15, not $2.50, or in other words, just high enough a bid to be on page 1!

      Also, if you're worried about getting a lot of clicks, even at .15 each, make your AdWords ad as irrelevant as possible to discourage anybody from clicking on it.

      Hope this helps someone save a sh*tload of money if they do test a *golden* keyword before moving forward to the site building part.

      ~ JoeCool
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      • Profile picture of the author J smith
        It depends a bit. How hard is it to rank for a keyword that gets say 3-4k searches a months and where you'll likely get 7-10 visitors for 10-4 positions on page 1. Target 10 keywords and it becomes 100 people a day. with say 1% buying w/e it is, you get 1 sale a day.

        nice but not going to make you rich, but make a site like that every month and in a year you'll have 12 sites like that, generating 1 sale a day each. with a comission of say 20$ you are looking at 240$/day after 1 year in mostly passive income. If you've built a list from each site you can probably get even more than that.

        So, you won't get much results for ranking for 1 keyword unless it's super popular, but rank for a whole bunch and all those 8.83 people add up to a significant amount.
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  • Profile picture of the author jasonmorgan
    that was a hot slap of reality

    good post and something I think a lot of people fail to understand. Page #1 is great but there is more too it.

    as for the side topic, many newbies fail to understand the importance of long-tail keywords and how they are a huge source of traffic.

    if you're not targeting main keywords and long-tail keywords, you're doing it wrong.
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    I'm all about that bass.

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  • Profile picture of the author garyseo786
    Getting your site in Top 10 is a different thing ...if you are in top 10 that does not mean that you are going to get most of the visitors on your site .CTR depends on many factor ..like position of your url among top 10,Your Title and Description ...A searcher will open your site only if he found exactly what he is looking for ? so try to get place on No-1 then you might get a big percentage of those huge searches
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    • Profile picture of the author money talk
      I have a photography website, I am bidding for a keyword phrase with an exact match of over 40 000 searches, with low competition. I am using IMSlave link blaster to try and get top positions, I jumped from position 250 to in the top 100 on yahoo and bing. I think I am going to keep on climbing up. If I get #1 position, what should I expect? can anyone help, I hope this post is ok....
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      • Profile picture of the author jerytohn
        Originally Posted by money talk View Post

        I have a photography website, I am bidding for a keyword phrase with an exact match of over 40 000 searches, with low competition. I am using IMSlave link blaster to try and get top positions, I jumped from position 250 to in the top 100 on yahoo and bing. I think I am going to keep on climbing up. If I get #1 position, what should I expect? can anyone help, I hope this post is ok....

        About 40%+ of the monthly searches. In your case should be 16k visitors per month ...

        Leaked AOL Data: The Importance Of Top Search Engine Rankings
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        Good Day People! This is my fav search engine: Google

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      • Profile picture of the author Lucid
        Originally Posted by money talk View Post

        If I get #1 position, what should I expect?
        Like I wrote up in the thread almost two years ago, a click rate of 26.92%. However, that was 2 years ago compiled on data that was already a couple of years old. Trends may have changed since. Search engines certainly have changed in that time. Note too that the data was from AOL.

        Your actual click rate may be higher or lower, the data is an average over all searches performed. An unattractive listing will reduce this number and an attractive one will increase it. Your niche may have an effect too as would the keywords you rank for. I know from doing PPC that some niches would not get near that 27%, even in top position, for whatever reason. For others, I've seen that click rate in lower positions. The problem with SEO is that you don't know if it's the way your listing appears, its message or just because people normally don't click.
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