SSL is the new requirement of GOOGLE?

by skylikemake 14 replies
Is SSL sertificate new requirement to be on the first page on google?
#search engine optimization #google #requirement #ssl
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  • Profile picture of the author expmrb
    No there is no such thing.

    These are for protection purposes only. If your site does money transactions then I will recommend it otherwise not.
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  • Profile picture of the author yukon
    Originally Posted by skylikemake View Post

    Is SSL sertificate new requirement to be on the first page on google?


    Yes, every single site in Google SERPs is https.

    All the http site pages have been deindexd. Everything. It's all gone.
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  • Google is in fact using SSL as a ranking factor going forward. A lot of big names like Neil Patel have been writing about this and doing tests.

    Many hosts are letting every site have SSL for free through letsencrypt.org so you might as well just do it and be safe for the future

    One I know of for sure is NameHero
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  • Profile picture of the author dave_hermansen
    Uhm ... why don't you do a search for anything that comes to mind and see if all of the results are HTTPS sites on page one. One site that you may know of that turns up for all kinds of search results is ... (drum roll, please) ... warriorforum.com (do you see any https before the URL, above?).

    Stupid people are blowing the SSL thing totally out of proportion and Google is not helping by being so vague. If you collect personal information, credit cards, sensitive information, you need an SSL on the pages that collect that information. Otherwise, not. We have more than 60 eCommerce sites live right now and the ONLY pages that use the SSL are the checkout pages and Contact Us. The non-SSL pages rank just fine and always will (i.e. the vast majority of the website).
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    • Profile picture of the author expmrb
      Originally Posted by dave_hermansen View Post

      Uhm ... why don't you do a search for anything that comes to mind and see if all of the results are HTTPS sites on page one. One site that you may know of that turns up for all kinds of search results is ... (drum roll, please) ... warriorforum.com (do you see any https before the URL, above?).

      Stupid people are blowing the SSL thing totally out of proportion and Google is not helping by being so vague. If you collect personal information, credit cards, sensitive information, you need an SSL on the pages that collect that information. Otherwise, not. We have more than 60 eCommerce sites live right now and the ONLY pages that use the SSL are the checkout pages and Contact Us. The non-SSL pages rank just fine and always will (i.e. the vast majority of the website).
      I agree with you. It may give rankings a boost but its not that permanent. And if don't need it then why do it?
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  • Profile picture of the author Anna Freedette
    Google has announced that going HTTPS adding a SSL 2048-bit key certificate on your site — will give you a minor ranking boost.

    Google says this gives websites a small ranking benefit, only counting as a very lightweight signal within the overall ranking algorithm. In fact, Google said this carries “less weight than other signals such as high-quality content. Based on their tests, Google says it has an impact on fewer than 1% of global queries but said they may decide to strengthen the signal because they want to encourage all website owners to switch from HTTP to HTTPS to keep everyone safe on the web.”

    Google also said based on their tests for the past few months, the HTTPS signal showed “positive results” in terms of relevancy and ranking in Google’s search results.
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  • Profile picture of the author Ronitak
    SSL stands for secure socket layer. It’s just used for security purpose. As google says that this gives ranking benefit to websites.
    Google already said that they wouldn’t penalize the websites that are not secure. So this is not the requirement of google.
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  • Profile picture of the author CDNgine
    This is what they announced about it last September, with an update to the post in December. Initially, it has more to do with their Chrome browser indicating a warning.

    "To help users browse the web safely, Chrome indicates connection security with an icon in the address bar. Historically, Chrome has not explicitly labelled HTTP connections as non-secure. Beginning in January 2017 (Chrome 56), well mark HTTP pages that collect passwords or credit cards as non-secure, as part of a long-term plan to mark all HTTP sites as non-secure."

    Common sense would therefore lead one to believe that they will slowly start to give more preference to HTTPS sites.

    https://security.googleblog.com/2016...ecure-web.html
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    • Profile picture of the author dave_hermansen
      Originally Posted by CDNgine View Post


      Common sense would therefore lead one to believe that they will slowly start to give more preference to HTTPS sites.
      I guess if you believe that common sense has anything to do with the way search engines work.

      Google has said it would have a very small effect on SEO, if you want to believe that what Google says and what they actually do are the same thing. They have been known to lay down all sorts of smoke screens to throw people off track as to how their algorithm really works.

      There are far more important things to worry about for SEO than having an SSL unless you are actually collecting information from customers on your site. Again, you only need the SSL on the pages that do that.

      We'll see what happens in the future but I, for one, have a raised eyebrow when it comes to this, just as I do for many other things that Google has misdirected webmasters about. There are far too many examples of pages without SSLs outranking pages that have them for me to take this sitewide SSL thing as anything but an overreaction by the SEO community to a vague statement that Google has made.

      If you examine Google's statement, you'll see that it is quite ambiguous ...

      "Beginning in January 2017, we’ll mark HTTP pages that collect passwords or credit cards as non-secure, as part of a long-term plan to mark all HTTP sites as non-secure."

      Notice how they start with the word "pages" and end with "sites"? It's no wonder the SEO community is so confused by this!

      Well, January 2017 has come and gone. None of our sites nor any sites we have seen that have SSLs for the pages that collect information have their non-secure pages marked with a non-secure designation. I can only surmise, based on the wording of the above statement, that it is because they are not pages that collect passwords or credit cards. Of course our secure pages do have an SSL and are marked as "secure".

      I should further add that our secure pages are blocked via robots.txt, since they are not pages we want or need Google to rank.

      There are some HUGE brands that do not have site-wide SSLs, including, homedepot.com, sears.com, target.com, hayneedle.com. We'll see how big of a deal this is in the future. I wouldn't plan on leapfrogging those sites with your little website when/if it happens, though!
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  • Profile picture of the author yukon
    It doesn't matter, noobs read crap on the web from sites like Patel and cling to everything they say whether it matters or not. What they don't get is they're in the middle of a sales funnel.

    Easy hype is what folks want even If they say they don't want it. Example, spend a little money on https and all of a sudden magically rank on Google SERPs. Not happening.
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    • Profile picture of the author dave_hermansen
      Originally Posted by yukon View Post

      It doesn't matter, noobs read crap on the web from sites like Patel and cling to everything they say whether it matters or not. What they don't get is they're in the middle of a sales funnel.

      Easy hype is what folks want even If they say they don't want it. Example, spend a little money on https and all of a sudden magically rank on Google SERPs. Not happening.
      A majority of what Neil Patel writes about is spot-on, but he, like may others, tends to overreact to general statements made by Google and uses correlations as proof instead of actual scientific proof. He's been at the forefront of several issues that many in the SEO community do not agree with, such as the importance of crafting your own meta descriptions and user behavior metrics influencing rankings - both of which I agree with.

      I'm not willing to totally diss Neil Patel because he provides a great deal of invaluable information and help to readers of his blog. Every now and then, it applies to blogs more than it does to other sites, such as eCommerce ones, though, which can often lead owners of non-blog sites astray. Ecommerce is its own animal and some things that apply to blogs simply do not work in the eCommerce world (although most do).

      I also think that he, like many others, interprets a little too much into the what I believe to be intentionally cryptic information that Google puts forth, which often is worded in a way that masks what they really do (yet can never be stated, due of the crafty wording, as an out-right lie).
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