Would adding a downloadable keyword rich PDF help increase SEO?

15 replies
  • SEO
  • |
For example, lets say i write a 2000 word article on dog grooming. And i then add a downloadable PDF report (right on the page) which is called "10 Tips On Dog Grooming".

Is google likely to consider my page better in the SERPS because the page includes a relevant downloadable PDF? One would imagine so, but no ones tends to do this so maybe google have not thought to even consider a PDF as adding value to a page.
#adding #downloadable #increase #keyword #pdf #rich #seo
Avatar of Unregistered
  • Profile picture of the author MikeFriedman
    Originally Posted by Zac The Man View Post

    For example, lets say i write a 2000 word article on dog grooming. And i then add a downloadable PDF report (right on the page) which is called "10 Tips On Dog Grooming".

    Is google likely to consider my page better in the SERPS because the page includes a relevant downloadable PDF? One would imagine so, but no ones tends to do this so maybe google have not thought to even consider a PDF as adding value to a page.
    The answer is no.

    Having a downloadable PDF does not mean you are offering anything better than any other page.
    Signature
    SEO, AdWords Management, Social Media Marketing, and more.
    Get a FREE Quote.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[11310943].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author Steve B
    Zac,

    I think a better approach would be to take your 2,000 word article and your PDF content (maybe another 2,000 words?) and create four (4) 1,000 word articles. Put them on a web site with a keyword rich dot com domain.

    Over the next two weeks, write (or hire out) one additional article every day and put each up on your site. In addition, distribute your articles (that are already indexed) with a resource box pointing back to your site. Aim to distribute them where your targeted prospects will see and read them.

    Adopt a weekly routine of writing one 1,000-1,500 word niche specific article every M-W-F (3/week) and use automation tools to distribute these to your niche audience. Focus on getting your content on high-authority sites - niche blogs, niche directories, niche forums, niche product sellers, etc. Web site owners in your niche are always looking for fresh, valuable content for their readers.

    Of course, begin building an email list at the same time. Send a "lite" version of your new articles as you write them to your list with a link back to the full article on your site. As your business gets a little traction, you can begin to make product suggestions to your list.

    After a few months of doing this you should have the basis of a great content-rich resource from which you can sell your own (and/or affiliate) products in the niche.

    What I'm suggesting is not a huge task ... but it requires some daily effort which most people won't do.

    The crux of the matter is this: do you want to have a profitable business with real customers and growing income? Or are you going to apply the least amount of effort possible like so many people struggling to make any money at all online? It's up to you.

    The very best,

    Steve
    Signature

    Steve Browne, online business strategies, tips, guidance, and resources
    SteveBrowneDirect

    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[11310983].message }}
    • Profile picture of the author Zac The Man
      Originally Posted by Steve B View Post

      Zac,

      I think a better approach would be to take your 2,000 word article and your PDF content (maybe another 2,000 words?) and create four (4) 1,000 word articles. Put them on a web site with a keyword rich dot com domain.

      Over the next two weeks, write (or hire out) one additional article every day and put each up on your site. In addition, distribute your articles (that are already indexed) with a resource box pointing back to your site. Aim to distribute them where your targeted prospects will see and read them.

      Adopt a weekly routine of writing one 1,000-1,500 word niche specific article every M-W-F (3/week) and use automation tools to distribute these to your niche audience. Focus on getting your content on high-authority sites - niche blogs, niche directories, niche forums, niche product sellers, etc. Web site owners in your niche are always looking for fresh, valuable content for their readers.

      Of course, begin building an email list at the same time. Send a "lite" version of your new articles as you write them to your list with a link back to the full article on your site. As your business gets a little traction, you can begin to make product suggestions to your list.

      After a few months of doing this you should have the basis of a great content-rich resource from which you can sell your own (and/or affiliate) products in the niche.

      What I'm suggesting is not a huge task ... but it requires some daily effort which most people won't do.

      The crux of the matter is this: do you want to have a profitable business with real customers and growing income? Or are you going to apply the least amount of effort possible like so many people struggling to make any money at all online? It's up to you.

      The very best,

      Steve
      No offense but this sounds like advice from 2008 rather than 2018. I think nowadays you need to create super high quality posts. That may mean having 3000 words on the page. Splitting the content up into 1000 word pieces means each piece might be considered less relevant by google. That's my take anyway. That's why i wanted to include a PDF on the page. The idea was to make each page the best it could be.

      I think if you create good content, you don't need to create backlinks. The backlinks will create themselves.
      {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[11311003].message }}
      • Profile picture of the author Steve B
        Originally Posted by Zac The Man View Post

        I think nowadays you need to create super high quality posts. That may mean having 3000 words on the page.

        Zac,

        Your assumptions are different than my experience.

        IMO, post length doesn't need to be 3000 words to insure high quality. In fact, readers today value short, hard-hitting, one main point content that can be quickly digested over lengthy and verbose reports. 3000 words in a report is roughly 12-15 pages and Google won't see any of it in a downloaded PDF.

        And contrary to what you said ("you don't need to create backlinks"), incoming links from authority sites are valuable, IMO.

        Steve
        Signature

        Steve Browne, online business strategies, tips, guidance, and resources
        SteveBrowneDirect

        {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[11311042].message }}
        • Profile picture of the author Zac The Man
          Originally Posted by Steve B View Post

          Zac,

          Your assumptions are different than my experience.

          IMO, post length doesn't need to be 3000 words to insure high quality. In fact, readers today value short, hard-hitting, one main point content that can be quickly digested over lengthy and verbose reports. 3000 words in a report is roughly 12-15 pages and Google won't see any of it in a downloaded PDF.

          And contrary to what you said ("you don't need to create backlinks"), incoming links from authority sites are valuable, IMO.

          Steve
          Its just my experience from running an article website. I created lots of poorish quality posts and then tried to force backlinks coming in. It didn't work out well. But when I create high quality content and just sit back - the backlinks come in by themselves.

          So you think a keyword rich PDF (and by keyword rich I mean the title of the PDF is keyword rich, not the inside of the document which of course Google can't see) is of little value to place on a page? I guess there is no real way to know. I would have thought it would help. Just like keyword rich images would help the onpage SEO.
          {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[11311047].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author MikeFriedman
    Originally Posted by Zac The Man View Post

    I think if you create good content, you don't need to create backlinks. The backlinks will create themselves.
    And what is your plan for driving traffic to the page before it ranks?

    Good content doesn't magically get links on its own.
    Signature
    SEO, AdWords Management, Social Media Marketing, and more.
    Get a FREE Quote.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[11311049].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author MikeFriedman
    Why do you think that linking to a PDF with a bunch more content would be better than just putting the content on the page itself?
    Signature
    SEO, AdWords Management, Social Media Marketing, and more.
    Get a FREE Quote.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[11311062].message }}
    • Profile picture of the author Zac The Man
      Originally Posted by MikeFriedman View Post

      Why do you think that linking to a PDF with a bunch more content would be better than just putting the content on the page itself?
      Just like placing a youtube video on the page helps make the page more relevant in Googles eyes. I thought having an on page downloadable PDF report would be similar to having a youtube video on page. It was just a thought. I haven't tested it yet.
      {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[11311082].message }}
      • Profile picture of the author MikeFriedman
        Originally Posted by Zac The Man View Post

        Just like placing a youtube video on the page helps make the page more relevant in Googles eyes. I thought having an on page downloadable PDF report would be similar to having a youtube video on page. It was just a thought. I haven't tested it yet.
        The YouTube video thing is debatable. I've never really seen any actual evidence of it improving ranks.

        There is no way a link to a PDF would be better than just putting the content of the PDF on the page. The only thing linking to the PDF might do is help the PDF to rank better.
        Signature
        SEO, AdWords Management, Social Media Marketing, and more.
        Get a FREE Quote.
        {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[11311095].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author Randall Magwood
    Well we all cant predict what the search engines will do from one day to the next when it comes to how their algorithms will rank a particular article/content piece. The best way to know for sure is to test it. Test it and see because this is the ultimate answer that will bring you satisfaction in your mind.
    Signature
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[11311077].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author Zac The Man
    As it happens, I came across a website who suggests you should embed a PDF into a page to improve performance in the SERPs. Though admittedly, they don't give any proof that it actually works. Its number 52 on the list on this page:

    https://www.blogginglove.com/google-ranking-factors/
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[11311103].message }}
    • Profile picture of the author MikeFriedman
      Originally Posted by Zac The Man View Post

      As it happens, I came across a website who suggests you should embed a PDF into a page to improve performance in the SERPs. Though admittedly, they don't give any proof that it actually works. Its number 52 on the list on this page:

      https://www.blogginglove.com/google-ranking-factors/
      That is just a list full of BS.

      #52. Number of Multimedia

      It matters a lot as to how many images, videos, PDFs, you embed into your article.
      So why stop at just 1 PDF? It sounds like you should embed 20... maybe 30.
      Signature
      SEO, AdWords Management, Social Media Marketing, and more.
      Get a FREE Quote.
      {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[11311118].message }}
  • {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[11311125].message }}
    • Profile picture of the author Zac The Man
      Originally Posted by Connann View Post

      Don't try to game the system.

      Instead, focus on QUALITY
      Burn. Isn't producing quality content gaming the system too though?
      {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[11311132].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author yukon
    Just so you know, a PDF file can be indexed and ranked the same as an HTML page.



    When Google crawls a PDF they automatically create a plain text version to use on their cache.

    Google will also follow hyperlinks inside a PDF.

    On your HTML webpage you can use a hyperlink pointing at a page inside your online PDF. Example, say I want to jump to page 7 on my PDF (has to be online) I simply add #page=7 at the end of the PDF URL.

    Here's a working example, click the link below and you will jump to page #7 inside a PDF file that's indexed, cached by Google.



    In this example, link above, I might use mechanical, plumbing and electrical permits as anchor-text on my HTML page with the PDF jump-link pointing at page 7 which mentions my anchor-text (mechanical, plumbing and electrical permits) back on the HTML page.

    You basically need to tie your HTML and PDF files together (links + relevancy).

    The PDF file type also holds pagerank, it's not public data in 2018 but believe me, they hold rank, again, the same as an HTML page.
    Signature
    - Shakin -
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[11330668].message }}
Avatar of Unregistered

Trending Topics