URL/domain name

by tmlandy 6 replies
I'm looking at a market that has a couple of possible niche opportunities and am trying to determine a blog ULR/domain name for good on-page coverage. I've been thinking about a three word URL/domain, let's call it "Red Flyer Wagon". Now the key word phrase "Red Flyer Wagon" by itself has little traffic but the term "Red Flyer" does and so does "Flyer Wagon". Getting on page one of the search term "Red Flyer Wagon" will not generate much traffic but getting on page one on search terms "Red Flyer" and "Flyer Wagon" would. Does anyone have any thoughts or experience in this type of domain name configuration. With a URL/domain name "Red Flyer Wagon" will I get good on-page "juice" for "Red Flyer" and "Flyer Wagon" or only for "Red Flyer Wagon"?

I could of course create two blogs one for "Red Flyer" and one for "Flyer Wagon" but that doubles the work and expense.

Hope this isn't too confusing.

Thanks for any help.
#search engine optimization #domain name #keywords #url #url or domain
  • Profile picture of the author travisman
    Banned
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    • Profile picture of the author tmlandy
      Sure I understand. I just want to make sure that by picking a URL/domain name that is a combination of two keyword phrases I'm not somehow diluting the impact.

      Thanks for the reply
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    • Profile picture of the author tmlandy
      Thanks Alex,

      Going by the number of google searches "Red Flyer" and "Flyer Wagon" are preferred to "Red Flyer Wagon".

      I was hoping that by combining the two phrases into "RFW" I would get on-page url and domain name "google ranking credit" for both RF and FW.
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      • Profile picture of the author ASM Marketing
        Originally Posted by tmlandy View Post

        Thanks Alex,

        Going by the number of google searches "Red Flyer" and "Flyer Wagon" are preferred to "Red Flyer Wagon".

        I was hoping that by combining the two phrases into "RFW" I would get on-page url and domain name "google ranking credit" for both RF and FW.
        The URL of either of those will help. The best thing I can advise is to make a decision and go for it

        Write great content, optimize your page names, page titles, header tags and alt tags, build some links and you'll do fine.

        The best answers come from experience, so jump in!

        Regards,
        Alex
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      • Profile picture of the author MikeFriedman
        I kind of disagree with Alex here.

        From what you are saying, you are looking for organic traffic from the search engines. You aren't relying on people typing in your URL. You want them to see you at the top of Google and click your site.

        So the phrase that your market might best associate with your product really doesn't enter into the equation in my mind.

        Now if your URL is just a jumbled mess like www.alkfjajfajioea.com, that's different. That would probably scream scam to someone.
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        • Profile picture of the author tmlandy
          Thanks Mike

          You're correct that's what I'm trying to accomplish. The the keyword phrase I'm using is natural. It's just longer than people typically type in when they do a search.
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  • Profile picture of the author ASM Marketing
    If you were your audience, which instance of the name would you most associate with your product/service?

    Choose the website that makes most sense, and feels most natural to the topic you are discussing.

    Regards,
    Alex
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