Does blog commenting actually boost Google SERPs? Anyone tested this?

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Does blog commenting boost the Google SE position for sites whose links have been posted with those comments?

The popular view is that it does. But do we know of any testing that's been done?

***

The best way to ask this rather comprehensive question is, I think, for me to put the following list in order from the WORST AT THE TOP to the best at the bottom.

Do you agree/disagree? - and why, please.


WORST = posting non-relevant comments to non-relevant blogs

I have in mind comments like these:
great post.
you really made me think.
i'll be back to read more later.
love your template.
my friend told me about your site.
thanks for that.
etc...


Question: Does this produce a negative response from Google OR no response OR some benefit?


BETTER = Finding any blogs that accept comments (they dont have to be relevant to your topic), then posting considered and well-expressed comments that actually respond to the original poster's content.

For example...
Let's say you have a weight loss site and I have a dog site. I visit your weight loss site and post a useful response to some weight loss topic you've addressed but my author's link goes back to my dog site.


BEST = Finding blogs that are relevant to the topic of your site (the one you want to link back to), then posting considered and well-expressed comments that actually respond to the discussion.


MY CONCLUSIONS SO FAR
1, the higher the quality of the COMMENT, the better
2, the higher the quality of the BLOG, the better.
3) the more RELEVANT the blog is to the theme of the link you are posting, the better.

Agree?

Or is that too simplistic? -- Because of real world time constraints, and considering that automated or semi-automated commenting software is so much faster than doing the whole thing manually, perhaps it has a contribution to make??

Gary
#blog #boost #commenting #google #serps #tested
  • Profile picture of the author Palitra
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    • Profile picture of the author GaryHarvey
      Ah yes, the nofollow/dofollow issue.
      I forgot to include that.
      Thanks for the reminder.

      Gary
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  • Profile picture of the author advertisingmonstor
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    • Profile picture of the author EX3
      For Firefox users, I ran into this plugin that I know use for my blog commenting called Quirk SearchStatus. It's kinda cool, cause you can toggle the "nofollow" so that it highlights if the link is actually a nofollow so you don't "waste your time" commenting on blogs that don't give you the backlink benefits.
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  • Profile picture of the author jewelster
    For my own opinion. Posting on relevant blogs, with useful comments will give lot more chance to rank high on SE. I have noticed it when I have just build few comments on relevant blogs and the result in my rankings in much higher than when I posted lots of comments on irrelevant blogs.
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    • Profile picture of the author The Expert
      I don't know why people say that commenting should be done on sites that relate to your niche only. Here's some contrast to this idea:

      1) Testing - watch the videos by freetraf. He runs one of those blog networks and has after numerous experiments shown that you can boost your search engine rankings for medium competition websites by getting links from only sites that are NOT related to your niche. This kills the original concept.

      2) The Niche - there are lots of niches where there are NOT a lot (if any) blogs that relate to your topic. Certainly not any power sites. The best have a PR 2 on the front page...forget the blog post where you'll get the comment from. I'll take a dofollow anchor-text link to my Shih Tzu site from a PR7 page on a iPhone blog over a links from a PR0 blog post on Kelly's Puppy palace any day of the week.

      When you factor in IP diversity, this is even worse. If there are only 5 blogs in your niche that are dofollow each updated an average of 15 times per YEAR, what do you do once you score a link on all of them? Go back for more non-link juice on non-authority sites? What do you do when you are playing in a niche that doesn't even HAVE one authority (PR5+) site across the whole web?

      From my personal experience, how close the content relates to my sites content just isn't an issue and I get good results. The other factors such as ip diversity, anchor text, dofollow, Root Domain PR, Actual Page PR and all the other stuff that goes into it are far more important.

      You just gotta ask yourself...how are all those people that were using Angela's Links-style packets getting those results when none of those sites related to each other...much less the user's sites?
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  • Profile picture of the author Trent Brownrigg
    I've been closely watching a top ranked blog in a VERY competitive niche and I would say around 80% or more of his links are from dofollow comments on other blogs. And most of them are not even close to being relevant to his niche.
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    • Profile picture of the author timpears
      Originally Posted by Trent Brownrigg View Post

      I would say around 80% or more of his links are from dofollow comments on other blogs. And most of them are not even close to being relevant to his niche.
      So around 20% must be on blogs or what ever with a nofollow tag. Which many people seem to think are of no value. When if Google only ever sees dofollow links, how UNNATURAL would that be? You need to have SOME nofolow links so it looks natural to Google.

      And you also prove the point that a link is a link. It doesn't matter if the site is relevant or not. Google doesn't pay any attention to that. Or if they do, then they pay little attention.

      I am not an authority on this. This is just my $0.02. If you disagree, that is ok with me. I am not going to worry about the relevancy of a site, or whether it is nofollow or not.
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      Tim Pears

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    • Profile picture of the author digidoodles
      Originally Posted by Trent Brownrigg View Post

      I've been closely watching a top ranked blog in a VERY competitive niche and I would say around 80% or more of his links are from dofollow comments on other blogs. And most of them are not even close to being relevant to his niche.
      And, there you have it.

      Warmly,

      Brandi
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  • Profile picture of the author thebitbotdotcom
    Yes. It works...if done correctly.
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    • Profile picture of the author DireStraits
      There's nothing much I can really add to the above "yes" responses to the OPs question, but I can reinforce their answers.

      So long as the blog isn't "nofollow", then any blog comments links will count towards boosting your search engine rankings just like any other link.

      Maybe Google does (or maybe they don't - I don't have the answer) give less credit for links which they obviously know can be made by anyone other than the site owner (and thus can and probably will be used for self promotion / SEO), but it wouldn't make sense for Google to outright discount any such links or even massively devalue them.

      Ask yourself this: Where would a practice of totally discounting such links end? Indeed, how would it even be a sensible or feasible practice?

      Given that there are many networks (Free Traffic System, SEO Link Vine, Article Ranks, Article Marketing Automation, My Article Network, etc) which can publish your posts directly to blogs and therefore give you links in the blog post body itself, that means any blog could also be a recipient of content from such a network.

      To play it safe, would Google then go so far as totally discounting any links it knows are from blogs, whether that link be in the post body or in the comments section? That'd hugely reduce the effectiveness of their algorithm / system, given that potentially any blog could be a part of such a network.

      To top it off, some of these networks are now capable of also publishing your posts and links to static HTML sites/pages, so Google wouldn't even be able to determine if anyone has the potential to publish posts to your site, given that your site wouldn't even look dynamically generated or capable of receiving content through such systems.

      They'd have to totally discount links from web 2.0 sites, forums, blogs, and any site where there could be user generated content / user input, and given that such sites don't even have to leave a footprint on the front end (such as obviously running on an easily distinguishable CMS script or what not), it'd be practically impossible and also a very bad move.

      There'd literally be very few if any sites left on the web where they'd be able to reasonably "trust" that a link is genuine and not manipulated, paid for or otherwise created as anything other than a genuine, wholehearted recommendation of the page/site being linked to.

      Not going to happen any time soon, so long as Google still predominantly determines its ranking via backlinks.

      It'd be like having an vote-based electoral system for politics (as we do), but then the electoral commission saying they can't count votes from people below a certain IQ (due to them not being able to make good decisions), anyone who has the potential to be "paid off" and so manipulated into voting a certain way (how would they know who that applies to?), and pretty much a million other potential circumstances in which the vote could be anything but genuinely from the heart.
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  • Profile picture of the author sarahberra
    This is a good question. The more you post the more your rankings go up.
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    • Profile picture of the author Orkhan Ibad
      As an expert who tested blog commenting, I can say that it works very well especially when you get comment links from authority blogs.
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  • Profile picture of the author cashcow
    1) Testing - watch the videos by freetraf. He runs one of those blog networks and has after numerous experiments shown that you can boost your search engine rankings for medium competition websites by getting links from only sites that are NOT related to your niche. This kills the original concept.
    I don't know who freetraf is, but this the 3rd example I have seen where people actually tested whether or not getting links from sites not related to your niche works and proved that they do.

    Of all the posts that I've seen saying you must get related links, I've yet to see someone that actually tested this.

    'nough said.

    Lee
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  • Profile picture of the author GaryHarvey
    Well it's been a while since I was here last.
    And I've just read everybody's answers.
    Thanks to you all.
    This has been so helpful.

    @The Expert
    Big thanks for your contribution. Especially...

    1) Testing - watch the videos by freetraf. He runs one of those blog networks and has after numerous experiments shown that you can boost your search engine rankings for medium competition websites by getting links from only sites that are NOT related to your niche. This kills the original concept.
    @timpears
    It keeps life simple, doesnt it?

    I am not going to worry about the relevancy of a site, or whether it is nofollow or not.
    @DireStraits
    You made a good case for any link is a good link.

    ***

    So I am now changing FROM this, my original tentative conclusion...

    MY CONCLUSIONS SO FAR
    1, the higher the quality of the COMMENT, the better
    2, the higher the quality of the BLOG, the better.
    3) the more RELEVANT the blog is to the theme of the link you are posting, the better.
    ...to this NEW CONCLUSION:

    Any link is a good link. And dofollow links are even better.

    Are there any dissenters?

    Gary
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  • Profile picture of the author Underground SEO
    if you comment on related content then yes you will probably see an increase in the serp's over time, however, as stated above I believe they have to be do-follow links.
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  • Profile picture of the author pandorasbox
    all links are followed and crawled, it is the power or relevancy that it will not get but as long as you use anchor text in link for name it will give you good juice in serp. There is a difference between doing things correctly and just doing things. Blogs are the future it is peer rating, it is considered live topic and that's why it has high importance because it is up to the minute not like news that can delay. So, yes they do a good job in the serp but remember one thing in SEO is never enough, everything must be done in combination.
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    • Profile picture of the author The Expert
      I agree with pandorasbox. All links will lead a spider to your site, even if no authority is passed because of nofollow. The more times the spiders are at your site, the better. Thus the more paths (links) to your site, the better.

      I just wouldn't spend a lot of time getting nofollow links. That's what scrapebox is for.
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  • Profile picture of the author GaryHarvey
    I really do appreciate the input
    from all of you. THANK YOU.

    CONCLUSION:

    Any link is a good link. And dofollow links are even better.


    Gary
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    • Profile picture of the author dburk
      Originally Posted by GaryHarvey View Post

      I really do appreciate the input
      from all of you. THANK YOU.

      CONCLUSION:

      Any link is a good link. And dofollow links are even better.


      Gary
      Hi Gary,

      That statement might be overly broad. There are links that I would consider not good, like links from pages that aren't indexed, especially if they are from penalized websites or extremely distasteful content.

      Those Warriors that talk about site topic relevance not making any difference are correct, however this may be a bit misleading to a new marketer that interprets this to mean that backlink relevance is unimportant. That couldn't be farther from the truth. Let me explain.

      Search engines technically do not index websites as a whole. They never attempt to determine the topic of a website, they are much more granular in their approach to relevancy. They do attempt to determine the relative relevancy of an individual document to particular keyword.

      Google is able to determine relevancy down to the individual HTML element. For example they are able to determine which individual paragraphs are relevant and which aren't. And they are able to score the relevancy with different levels of relevancy.

      Google looks at the overall relevancy of your page including how relevant and important the outbound and inbound links are. Collectively these elements combine to form your overall relevancy score which is used to rank your page in the SERP.

      I believe the root of much confusion comes from the notion that search engines index and rank websites, they don't. They index and rank individual web documents (technically individual URLs). Once you understand this fundamental concept it makes perfect since why search engines have no interest in website topics. It would simply lower the quality of their search results.
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  • Profile picture of the author jazbo
    Blog commenting can help with linkbuilding, if you target the right blogs and post comments people will want to publish.

    Personally though I see blog commenting as a great marketing opportunity.
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  • Profile picture of the author GaryHarvey
    You add a worthy and important qualification
    which I sweepingly overlooked.
    I thank you.

    Yes, there are "bad neighbourhoods"
    though I believe Google does not
    penalize you if a scummy site links
    TO you... else it'd be the easiest
    way to kill off a competitor.

    Nevertheless, they are well steered
    clear of where we have a choice.

    Gary
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  • Profile picture of the author Vexo
    I have had mixed results so far, testing never stops
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  • Profile picture of the author dbomez
    I agree with The Expert. Any link is good, relevancy is probably a factor but not as near as other things or as much people say it is. I heard some known SEO experts say that non-relevant links count almost as much as relevant so I see no point why we should leave out non-relevant links. Only reason why maybe someone should concentrate on relevant links at the beginning is because it's easier to get link from relevant website than is from non-relevant (not as much for blog commenting but for other link building methods it matters more).

    I think Blog comments are generally considered "low quality" links because Google can easily detect them and BC is often used for SERPs manipulation so Google has devalued them but they still count even though not as much as they used to.
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