Looking For Yukon But Anyone Else Can Chime in As Well

by dp40oz
11 replies
  • SEO
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I was gonna PM Yukon about this but I figured we could all learn if I posted it and Im sure other experts on this subject could chime in.

Ive just finished putting together the content for a monster website. Ive built big sites before but nothing of this magnitude. The site will probably go live with about 5000 pages. Now my question is how to go about internally linking the site. Lets say for example this is a site about Insurance (which its not but the example should fit what I am doing). Now lets say I have pages that are:

-Car Insurance-
Average Cost of Car Insurance
Average Cost of Geico Car Insurance
Average Cost of All State Car Insurance
Average Cost of Progressive Car Insurance
and so on
-Homeowners Insurance-
Average Cost of Geico Homeowners Insurance
Average Cost of All State Homeowners Insurance
Average Cost of Progressive Homeowners Insurance
ect.....

Now for each page I have a list of the prices by state. So the "Average Cost of Geico Car Insurance" page would have.

Average Cost of Geico Car Insurance in Alabama - Price
Average Cost of Geico Car Insurance in Alaska - Price
Average Cost of Geico Car Insurance in Arkansas - Price
and so on

Now the point of this website is to capitalize on tons of long tail traffic. So normally I link my sites like wikipedia. Any time something within the content is a keyword or relevant I link it to the page it is relevant for. For this site though my first instinct would be to link all of the state long tail keywords to the main "Average Cost of Geico Car Insurance" Page that they reside on.

- Average Cost of Geico Car Insurance - (This is the main page)
Average Cost of Geico Car Insurance in Alabama (Linking to main page)
Average Cost of Geico Car Insurance in Alaska (Linking to main page)
Average Cost of Geico Car Insurance in Arkansas (Linking to main page)

My thought process behind this is that now the "Average Cost of Geico Car Insurance" page will have all the long tails linking to it that I want to rank for hence giving them an anchored link for these terms. My problem is that then each page of the entire website will have 50 links on them, all very similar, the only difference being the state which I feel Panda & Penguin might hate. I also thought about using jump links. So it could be.

insurancesite.cxm/average-cost-of-geico-car-insurance#alabama
insurancesite.cxm/average-cost-of-geico-car-insurance#alaska
insurancesite.cxm/average-cost-of-geico-car-insurance#arkansas

How would you go about linking a site like this? Would you bother hyperlinking each longtail state per page? I just want to maximize each long tail for each page. Since the site is so huge I won't be actively linking each page I'll only bother with building the authority of the homepage so I feel internal linking is the only way to let Google know about all these long tails. Any thoughts or help is much appreciated.
#chime #yukon
  • Profile picture of the author VinRFP
    Siloing sites is a little less complicated than most people think.

    From what I can tell, you have two options:

    1. You can do something like this:
    • insurance.com/car-insurance/average-cost/geico/statename
    • insurance.com/home-owners/average-cost/state-farm/statename
    This is going to get very cumbersome, but isn't too difficult.

    2. You can also do it backwards, with something like:

    • insurance.com/car-insurance/alabama
    Then on each state site, you can list whatever vendors you want like this:

    • insurance.com/car-insurance/alabama/geico
    • insurance.com/car-insurance/alabama/state-farm
    • etc...










    Originally Posted by dp40oz View Post

    I was gonna PM Yukon about this but I figured we could all learn if I posted it and Im sure other experts on this subject could chime in.

    Ive just finished putting together the content for a monster website. Ive built big sites before but nothing of this magnitude. The site will probably go live with about 5000 pages. Now my question is how to go about internally linking the site. Lets say for example this is a site about Insurance (which its not but the example should fit what I am doing). Now lets say I have pages that are:

    -Car Insurance-
    Average Cost of Car Insurance
    Average Cost of Geico Car Insurance
    Average Cost of All State Car Insurance
    Average Cost of Progressive Car Insurance
    and so on
    -Homeowners Insurance-
    Average Cost of Geico Homeowners Insurance
    Average Cost of All State Homeowners Insurance
    Average Cost of Progressive Homeowners Insurance
    ect.....

    Now for each page I have a list of the prices by state. So the "Average Cost of Geico Car Insurance" page would have.

    Average Cost of Geico Car Insurance in Alabama - Price
    Average Cost of Geico Car Insurance in Alaska - Price
    Average Cost of Geico Car Insurance in Arkansas - Price
    and so on

    Now the point of this website is to capitalize on tons of long tail traffic. So normally I link my sites like wikipedia. Any time something within the content is a keyword or relevant I link it to the page it is relevant for. For this site though my first instinct would be to link all of the state long tail keywords to the main "Average Cost of Geico Car Insurance" Page that they reside on.

    - Average Cost of Geico Car Insurance - (This is the main page)
    Average Cost of Geico Car Insurance in Alabama (Linking to main page)
    Average Cost of Geico Car Insurance in Alaska (Linking to main page)
    Average Cost of Geico Car Insurance in Arkansas (Linking to main page)

    My thought process behind this is that now the "Average Cost of Geico Car Insurance" page will have all the long tails linking to it that I want to rank for hence giving them an anchored link for these terms. My problem is that then each page of the entire website will have 50 links on them, all very similar, the only difference being the state which I feel Panda & Penguin might hate. I also thought about using jump links. So it could be.

    insurancesite.cxm/average-cost-of-geico-car-insurance#alabama
    insurancesite.cxm/average-cost-of-geico-car-insurance#alaska
    insurancesite.cxm/average-cost-of-geico-car-insurance#arkansas

    How would you go about linking a site like this? Would you bother hyperlinking each longtail state per page? I just want to maximize each long tail for each page. Since the site is so huge I won't be actively linking each page I'll only bother with building the authority of the homepage so I feel internal linking is the only way to let Google know about all these long tails. Any thoughts or help is much appreciated.
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    • Profile picture of the author dp40oz
      Originally Posted by VinRFP View Post

      Siloing sites is a little less complicated than most people think.

      From what I can tell, you have two options:

      1. You can do something like this:
      • insurance.com/car-insurance/average-cost/geico/statename
      • insurance.com/home-owners/average-cost/state-farm/statename
      See I was thinking about that but then that would require putting each individual state on its own separate page. So if I did

      insurance.com/car-insurance/average-cost/geico/statename

      Those "statename" pages would have virtually no content other then one line with the price of the insurance. Thats why I wanted to make 1 main page for each subject so the main page has all states on it.

      So "insurance.com/car-insurance/average-cost/geico" would have every state listed with its price. That page would be a very useful and content filled page but I lose the state specific long tail link this way since each state won't have its own page. Unless I link as described originally, with all the text like "average car insurance cost in alabama" linking back to the page they are on "insurance.com/car-insurance/average-cost/geico"
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  • Profile picture of the author yukon
    Banned
    Originally Posted by dp40oz View Post

    I was gonna PM Yukon about this but I figured we could all learn if I posted it and Im sure other experts on this subject could chime in.

    Ive just finished putting together the content for a monster website. Ive built big sites before but nothing of this magnitude. The site will probably go live with about 5000 pages. Now my question is how to go about internally linking the site. Lets say for example this is a site about Insurance (which its not but the example should fit what I am doing). Now lets say I have pages that are:

    -Car Insurance-
    Average Cost of Car Insurance
    Average Cost of Geico Car Insurance
    Average Cost of All State Car Insurance
    Average Cost of Progressive Car Insurance
    and so on
    -Homeowners Insurance-
    Average Cost of Geico Homeowners Insurance
    Average Cost of All State Homeowners Insurance
    Average Cost of Progressive Homeowners Insurance
    ect.....

    Now for each page I have a list of the prices by state. So the "Average Cost of Geico Car Insurance" page would have.

    Average Cost of Geico Car Insurance in Alabama - Price
    Average Cost of Geico Car Insurance in Alaska - Price
    Average Cost of Geico Car Insurance in Arkansas - Price
    and so on

    Now the point of this website is to capitalize on tons of long tail traffic. So normally I link my sites like wikipedia. Any time something within the content is a keyword or relevant I link it to the page it is relevant for. For this site though my first instinct would be to link all of the state long tail keywords to the main "Average Cost of Geico Car Insurance" Page that they reside on.

    - Average Cost of Geico Car Insurance - (This is the main page)
    Average Cost of Geico Car Insurance in Alabama (Linking to main page)
    Average Cost of Geico Car Insurance in Alaska (Linking to main page)
    Average Cost of Geico Car Insurance in Arkansas (Linking to main page)

    My thought process behind this is that now the "Average Cost of Geico Car Insurance" page will have all the long tails linking to it that I want to rank for hence giving them an anchored link for these terms. My problem is that then each page of the entire website will have 50 links on them, all very similar, the only difference being the state which I feel Panda & Penguin might hate. I also thought about using jump links. So it could be.

    insurancesite.cxm/average-cost-of-geico-car-insurance#alabama
    insurancesite.cxm/average-cost-of-geico-car-insurance#alaska
    insurancesite.cxm/average-cost-of-geico-car-insurance#arkansas

    How would you go about linking a site like this? Would you bother hyperlinking each longtail state per page? I just want to maximize each long tail for each page. Since the site is so huge I won't be actively linking each page I'll only bother with building the authority of the homepage so I feel internal linking is the only way to let Google know about all these long tails. Any thoughts or help is much appreciated.
    I understand the 50 pages (states), but what's the content for the other 4,950 pages?

    Ideally I try to at the very least rank 3 pages per keyword, (1 page) my main page that I want to rank in the SERPs, (2 pages) that I want to alternatively rank in the SERPs or even better a triple SERP listing per keyword.

    I don't try & rank pages unless they have other internal supporting pages to help support the main internal page I'm trying to rank, it's just easier to work with IMO, instead of depending on external links to do all the work.

    You really need as unique page titles as possible. A lot of times similar page titles will end up being buried in Supplemental SERPs.

    A single page with Jump-Links might be a good idea, at least you'll stand a better chance at getting the Jump-Links listed in your SERP descriptions, which should help get a higher CTR in the SERPs.
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  • Profile picture of the author retsek
    IMO, you're going too deep.

    5,000 is not really alot of pages so work it out so that no page is more than 3 levels/clicks away from the homepage.

    You have to consider this because in all likelihood you'll never garner as much links as a wikipedia or a amazon or even a mashable. Sites like those can afford deep pages.

    Keep links per page around 50-75.
    Having rel=next/rel=prev on paginated categories is also good.
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    • Profile picture of the author yukon
      Banned
      Originally Posted by retsek View Post

      IMO, you're going too deep.

      5,000 is not really alot of pages so work it out so that no page is more than 3 levels/clicks away from the homepage.

      You have to consider this because in all likelihood you'll never garner as much links as a wikipedia or a amazon or even a mashable. Sites like those can afford deep pages.

      Keep links per page around 50-75.
      Having rel=next/rel=prev on paginated categories is also good.
      I wouldn't depend on paginated links (rel="next" and rel=prev") as far as SEO goes.

      [source]
      Categorize paginated documents. [launch codename "Xirtam3", project codename "CategorizePaginatedDocuments"] Sometimes, search results can be dominated by documents from a paginated series. This change helps surface more diverse results in such cases.
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  • Profile picture of the author retsek
    yukon, that has nothing to do with it.

    In fact, a good SEO wouldn't want their paginated categories ranking for anything other than the main keyword for that category.

    By implementing rel=prev/rel=next, you're essentially making a long serious paginated category pages into one single document. That is, the search engines (both Google and Bing) view it as a single document.

    Why that is good?

    It consolidates all your link juice and indexing into the first page of the series.

    If you have a category called "Dogs" with 500 posts at 10 posts per page. That category would probably rank better for "dogs" because Google would see it as single page rather than 50 pages.

    I don't, however, recommend putting rel=next/rel=prev onto serialized posts.
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    • Profile picture of the author yukon
      Banned
      Originally Posted by retsek View Post

      yukon, that has nothing to do with it.

      In fact, a good SEO wouldn't want their paginated categories ranking for anything other than the main keyword for that category.

      By implementing rel=prev/rel=next, you're essentially making a long serious paginated category pages into one single document. That is, the search engines (both Google and Bing) view it as a single document.

      Why that is good?

      It consolidates all your link juice and indexing into the first page of the series.

      If you have a category called "Dogs" with 500 posts at 10 posts per page. That category would probably rank better for "dogs" because Google would see it as single page rather than 50 pages.

      I don't, however, recommend putting rel=next/rel=prev onto serialized posts.
      If I have 10 pages in a series on the same subject, I'm aiming for a triple SERP listing for my target keyword.

      I build my category pages to support the page I want ranked #1 in the SERPs.

      I consider my category pages as a series of pages, since the pages are all based on the same subject. I don't use rel=prev/rel=next tags on my sites, I can have the same user experience with a normal hyperlink.
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      • Profile picture of the author retsek
        Originally Posted by yukon View Post

        If I have 10 pages in a series on the same subject, I'm aiming for a triple SERP listing for my target keyword.

        I build my category pages to support the page I want ranked #1 in the SERPs.

        I consider my category pages as a series of pages, since the pages are all based on the same subject. I don't use rel=prev/rel=next tags on my sites, I can have the same user experience with a normal hyperlink.
        Yukon, the user doesn't even see rel=next/rel-next tags, so it's not a matter of user experience. rel=next/rel=prev tags go in the head section.

        It's a matter of telling the SEs that this particular series of pages should be considered as one and all the linking and content factors should be consolidated.
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        • Profile picture of the author yukon
          Banned
          Originally Posted by retsek View Post

          Yukon, the user doesn't even see rel=next/rel-next tags, so it's not a matter of user experience. rel=next/rel=prev tags go in the head section.

          It's a matter of telling the SEs that this particular series of pages should be considered as one and all the linking and content factors should be consolidated.
          I know traffic will never see the rel= code, but Google bots will see the code just fine.

          Read that link I posted above from Google blog:
          Sometimes, search results can be dominated by documents from a paginated series. This change helps surface more diverse results in such cases.
          That quote above will rank a single page. When they say "This change helps surface more diverse results", I take that comment as they want to show pages form other sites, instead of multiple pages (per keyword) from sites that use rel="next" tags.

          My goal is ranking multiple pages per keyword & I don't think a rel="next" will make it happen.

          All I know is I'm getting multiple SERP listings (now) per keyword & I'm not running the rel="next" tags on any of my sites while I'm getting the multiple listings.
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          • Profile picture of the author retsek
            Originally Posted by yukon View Post

            I know traffic will never see the rel= code, but Google bots will see the code just fine.

            Read that link I posted above from Google blog:


            That quote above will rank a single page. When they say "This change helps surface more diverse results", I take that comment as they want to show pages form other sites, instead of multiple pages (per keyword) from sites that use rel="next" tags.

            My goal is ranking multiple pages per keyword & I don't think a rel="next" will make it happen.

            All I know is I'm getting multiple SERP listings (now) per keyword & I'm not running the rel="next" tags on any of my sites while I'm getting the multiple listings.
            Googlebot can detect a paginated series whether you use rel=next/rel=prev or not. They were doing it long before these tags were introduced.

            All i'm saying is what with the implementation of the tags, you can now tell that a certain set of navigation pages are related. It might not help or affect multiple listings, but it will help your site or that particular category of posts on the whole.
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  • Profile picture of the author pons_saravanan
    I would advise you to prepare the sitemap for this site and add it to the robots.txt for the search engines to spider all the contents properly
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