Why doesn't google like micro niche websites?

12 replies
  • SEO
  • |
I always see people saying that micro niche sites are bad, so why does Google hate them? Also, what are the main differences between Authority and MNS?

Kyle
#google #micro #niche #websites
  • Profile picture of the author Brendan Mace
    Micro niche sites are usually created solely for profit. They target specific "exact match" keywords that have lucrative traffic numbers, and then they JAM ads down visitors throats. Not all micro niche sites are that way, but definitely the vast majority of them are.

    Authority sites can also be made for profit, but they also add a signficant amount of value to visitors. Otherwise they wouldn't be "authority" type sites.

    It's okay to build niche sites, but it's better to at least add some value in whatever you decide to build these days.

    Hope this helps!
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7414393].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author Danny Cutts
    Majority don't offer any value to the user and that the goal of the sites tend to be to make money....

    You need to add value and do more to please the user.... I try and reverse engineer my sites so that I can be sure that users are getting what they are looking for

    Danny
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7414663].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author RogueOne
    Originally Posted by Murphysmurfy View Post

    I always see people saying that micro niche sites are bad, so why does Google hate them? Also, what are the main differences between Authority and MNS?

    Kyle
    I think "micro niche sites" is being confused with "mini sites." Huge difference. A MNS is not by definition a thin site. "Micro niche" is simply an indication of the scope of the niche, and not the size, content or "for profit" status of a website.

    Music is a niche. "How to play Bluegrass music on a guitar with the toes on your right foot", is a micro-niche.
    Signature
    Get Off The Warrior Forum Now & Don't Come Back If You Want To Succeed!
    All The Real Marketers Are Gone. There's Nothing Left But Weak, Sniveling Wanna-Bees!
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7414689].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author DubDubDubDot
    Originally Posted by Murphysmurfy View Post

    I always see people saying that micro niche sites are bad, so why does Google hate them? Also, what are the main differences between Authority and MNS?
    Google doesn't hate minisites; web surfers hate minisites. And thus with no natural linking going on, it gives the appearance that Google hates minisites.

    The "authority site" label was created by minisite owners themselves. I'm not even sure what it's supposed to mean. I suppose it's their name for a site they spend more time developing than minisites.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7414907].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author karlmay1980
    Because they can be set up in hours, have very little content that Google can display and many are driven just to make a profit while offering little value to the visitor or purchaser.
    Signature
    Want To Make Your First £10,000 Online?
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7414919].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author LarryC
    I don't think Google loves or hates microniche sites. How Google ranks it depends on the quality of the individual site. The niche doesn't matter much -unless it's so obscure that no one visits it.
    Signature
    Content Writing, Ghostwriting, eBooks, editing, research.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7414929].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author UMS
    Originally Posted by Murphysmurfy View Post

    I always see people saying that micro niche sites are bad, so why does Google hate them? Also, what are the main differences between Authority and MNS?
    Google doesn't love or hate anything. It's not an anthropomorphic entity.

    MNS and Authority are not necessarily mutually exclusive. It is quite possible to have a MNS that is also an Authority site. It's the the size or scope of a site that makes it an Authority, it's whether people find it very relevant and useful and well known that helps make it an authority site.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7414937].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author sbucciarel
    Banned
    Because they don't provide any value to the user and the owners previously had been able to flood the first couple of pages with a bunch of worthless one page sales letters for popular keywords. Makes for a bad user experience when you're actually looking for information instead of a sales letter.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7415073].message }}
    • Profile picture of the author Alexa Smith
      Banned
      It's another of those confusing conversations in which two completely different things are being simultaneously discussed: micro-niche sites and niche microsites (or niche minisites, anyway).

      When you say "micro niche site" do you intend the "micro" description to be applied to the niche, or to the site? This expression is quite widely used with each meaning.

      I think of a micro-niche site as a site - regardless of its size - whose subject-matter is a micro-niche (small, highly specified sub-niche), but I'm not sure if you do. I'm sure a couple of the replies above are taking you as meaning "minisite". Was that what you meant?
      {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7415611].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author sethczerepak
    Originally Posted by Murphysmurfy View Post

    I always see people saying that micro niche sites are bad, so why does Google hate them? Also, what are the main differences between Authority and MNS?

    Kyle
    It's not Google that hates them, it's Google's customers.

    Google just tests just like we do, and they have much better tools. When their customers respond poorly to a site (aka, high bounce rates etc), Google makes a move to give those customers more of what they want and less of what they don't want.

    So a more accurate question would be...

    Why don't customers like micro-niche sites? Or better yet, how do YOU respond when you're looking for an answer to a question and you land on one of those sites? No meaningful information, just a squeeze offer which takes you directly to a sales page.

    Looking at it this way, common sense answers the question for you. Just try to imagine a customer saying this:

    "I'm going to Google to look for a solution/answer about _____. Gee, sure hope to find a product offer or an invitation to join ANOTHER mailing list!"

    If that ^ consumer were sitting in a hot tub with Santa Claus and the Easter Bunny, which one do you think would get out first? None of them! Because they're all figments of the imagination.

    I understand why people build these sites, they're quick and easy and there WAS a time when they worked. Those days are over, the Wild West of Cyberspace is being tamed. There's a new sheriff in town, with a great big "G" stamped across their chest.

    "Big G" responds to the behaviors of web users, and so should we. Think about what you want when you Google a term, and give that to your visitors. Split test and refine according to what people really want. The rest will take care of itself.

    -Best of luck to you
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7415643].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author Randall Magwood
    My guess is because they want only sites that will actually benefit their users... instead of arriving at a site that is obviously trying to sell them something.
    Signature

    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7416271].message }}

Trending Topics