The Affect Words Like "In" and "To" Have on SEO

13 replies
  • SEO
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For a few years now I've always been unsure of the effect these words have on SEO. I think the technically correct reference to them in the English language is "determiners".

Take for example, if you were doing SEO for "plumber new york". Is it better to do on-page optimization with the grammatically correct "plumber in new york"?

A lot of SEO tools I know of do not factor in determiners when analyzing the SEO of a page thinking your keyword "plumber new york" is not in your title tag if you write "plumber in new york". From a user stand-point (and hence likely Google's point of view), it makes sense to optimize for the more human-form "plumber in new york" which should therefore perform better for the search term "plumber new york".

Thoughts on this issue? Any good articles or case studies?
#affect #seo #words
  • Profile picture of the author Kevin Maguire
    Right now I want to kill your thread and cut off your hands so you can't type. Your on the cusp of figuring out my entire SEO strategy for 2013 onward.

    Seeing search from a engine user perspective is the approach I have begun to take. We all get blinded by these retarded looking search terms, that are next to impossible to place within content and make any sense to the reader.

    People talk to search engines. That's the key.

    I begun testing this theory about 6 weeks ago, on a fresh site. And in a market that would be seen as impossible for anyone to go for.

    And without giving the whole game away.
    The results after only 5 weeks, have been absolutely jaw dropping.
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    • Profile picture of the author Joshua Uebergang
      haha Kevin. You had me worried. Thanks man for your experience... and preserving my hands.
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  • Profile picture of the author trade4861
    Ideally you would want to use every possible combination of phrases, but normally I would leave out IN, TO etc. I seem to get more traffic when I eliminate all wordiness in sentences. It just separate important keywords, and word order matters. Since most people don't use wordiness in search queries, don't use it in your content.

    On top of that, many people don't use a grammatically correct order of words. Since word order matters, it does not make that much sense to write for readers, because many people don't talk to search engines, they just type the most important words.

    I've tested this all before, got more visitors by just writing the way people search. Since every person will use different phrases in search, just add every possible parses imaginable in your content page...including the words IN, TO, THE, WHERE, WHAT etc. But expect spammy looking content lol.

    I would be more worried about phrases that you don't think of, example: "best cheap new york plumber free estimate". That example may look stupid but it works for getting traffic. In fact, in most cases, following that example, it often means the difference of over 1,000 visitors a month for one page as compared to writing grammatically correct. Google might penalize you for writing like that.
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    • Profile picture of the author Joshua Uebergang
      Originally Posted by trade4861 View Post

      In fact, in most cases, following that example, it often means the difference of over 1,000 visitors a month for one page as compared to writing grammatically correct. Google might penalize you for writing like that.
      What you said here is contradictory to itself.

      When in doubt, check search results I suppose to see what the top competitors do.
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      • Profile picture of the author G minus
        Research "SEO Stop Words". Actually there's a good explanation here What Are SEO Stop Words?
        No affiliation, Just something I found with a quick search. There is also a link to the site with a full list of stop words that I already had bookmarked. A 2 for 1 deal for ya.
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        • Profile picture of the author G minus
          Oh! There are people that know. It's just not mentioned very often.
          You were close but missing the term I gave you.
          Can't PM because I rarely post on here just for this reason.
          Cause somehow I always feel like I'm shooting myself in the foot.
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        • Profile picture of the author Kevin Maguire
          Originally Posted by G minus View Post

          Research "SEO Stop Words". Actually there's a good explanation here What Are SEO Stop Words?
          No affiliation, Just something I found with a quick search. There is also a link to the site with a full list of stop words that I already had bookmarked. A 2 for 1 deal for ya.
          Research "Keyword Research" there are many articles to be found on the subject. No Affiliation, just something I found with a long term search.

          "SEO Stop words" is referring to things like

          Inurl
          In meta

          Where it is OK to Use SEO Stop Words

          This does not mean that you can't use SEO Stop words anywhere on your website. It is perfectly OK to use the SEO Stop words within the textual body content of your website. After all, the body text of your website would not make much sense without important words such as "Me", "The", "And", etc.
          ^^^
          From the article your citing.

          It also mentions to not use "SEO Stop words" in

          Links
          Anchor

          But here's the thing.

          What happens when the "SEO Stop words" are the keyword.

          Kinda puts a different spin on things then?

          Lets use a couple of keyword examples.

          "Very best plumber in New York"
          and strip it
          "Best Plumber New York"

          Lets say they are equal in search volume.

          Which do you choose for your article/anchor/link ?

          When the "Stop word" is part of the keyword.
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          • Profile picture of the author G minus
            I have no clue what this >> Research "Keyword Research" there are many articles to be found on the subject. No Affiliation, just something I found with a long term search. << is supposed to to even mean.

            Other than to take it as some smart ass reply.
            What is a long term search? And how would "Keyword Research" even qualify as a long TAIL search if that's what you were meaning to say.

            Never mind, You're not to OP & obviously didn't fully read or "get" the article or check the link in it to even more info.

            He asked for articles pertaining to his question and that is what I gave so hopefully HE will benefit from it.

            You just seem a little wizzed about someone revealing or already knowing the big secret you thought you had. When the truth is that it's far from anything new or even really some big secret.

            There will be no further replies from me on this post so have a good night.
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            • Profile picture of the author Kevin Maguire
              I told the OP
              Your on the cusp of figuring out my entire SEO strategy for 2013 onward
              Not that he had. And it has nothing to do with "Stop Words". They play no part in what I'm working on. That's the point I'm making to you.

              The OP post has nothing to do with "Stop Words either. That's the main thing, I was trying to point out to you.

              But don't get stressed over it. Chill and be happy.
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              • Profile picture of the author Joshua Uebergang
                Kevin, how does what you say differ from stop words? I'm guessing, you are referring to doing SEO with a human-centered focus like the more-human variation of search queries which are grammatically correct?

                I have a few clients and rank-monitoring that I have began testing this on.
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                • Profile picture of the author Kevin Maguire
                  Originally Posted by Joshua Uebergang View Post

                  Kevin, how does what you say differ from stop words? I'm guessing, you are referring to doing SEO with a human-centered focus like the more-human variation of search queries which are grammatically correct?

                  I have a few clients and rank-monitoring that I have began testing this on.
                  Exactly

                  But I shall pm you the rest of the story.
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      • Profile picture of the author trade4861
        Originally Posted by Joshua Uebergang View Post

        What you said here is contradictory to itself.

        When in doubt, check search results I suppose to see what the top competitors do.
        In my niche I am one of the top competitors.

        Anyway, all I was saying is try both methods. If your goal is to dominate search results using good grammar...

        Eliminate redundant pairs
        Delete unnecessary qualifiers
        Limit prepositional phrases
        Eliminate unnecessary modifiers
        Change a phrase with a word
        Change negatives to affirmatives
        Avoid using cliches

        Eliminate (to, in, the, is, which etc.) as much as possible. This will all have a huge affect on how your page ranks.

        And when you see competitors in top spots that don't follow these rules, its because they have trust authority, links etc. And when in doubt, look at your analytics, not just your competitors.

        Even then, there is far more that ranks a page then just adding or subtracting stop words.
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    • Profile picture of the author Kevin Maguire
      Originally Posted by trade4861 View Post

      Your entire post
      I could spend 30 minutes shredding it word for word. But like I said in my original post. I'm glad that everyone seems to be ignorant to this simple "make sense" concept.
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