Lawyer Facebook Page (please help!)

18 replies
Hey Warriors,

A client of mine was recently working with a social media agency for the past 5 months. They did updates daily, but clearly bought fake likes for the client. The page has about 400 likes and absolutely no engagement (or visitors based on social insights).

I will be taking over the clients Facebook, and am looking for ideas on the best ways to grow it. I will have a small budget of $50 per month to put toward Facebook ads (page "like" generation) and post boosting (post "like" and "comment" generation), just to try to generate SOME engagement on the page.

The client is a lawyer, and doesn't want much humor with the social updates. So I largely have to keep the content related to bankruptcy law (which is pretty dry by nature). The client is targeting in their local area, so I will be creating advertisements to target people in their city and demographic specifically.

My question is this: What is the best way to run Facebook ads for this type of client? What would you do with $50 to spend monthly? (If your goal is to increase page likes and engagement on the page). I will be posting updates on the page daily, with images and call to actions/all that jazz. But I need some guidance on the best way to approach generating engagement with the $50 per month I have.

Thanks!
#facebook #lawyer #page
  • Profile picture of the author Rendition
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    • Profile picture of the author EzraWinter
      Depending on the lawyer's specific practice, it can be very difficult to drive social media, as people don't necessarily want to publicly engage with a lawyer.

      Again hard to say without knowing the area of law. I think community aggregators like Reddit and easily searchable networks like Twitter are better options (i.e. periodically search Boston car accident on Twitter if the lawyer does personal injury and reach out to people that way.) I was able to refer a highly lucrative case to a law firm client of mine, when they posted about something on Reddit, in the sub reddit for that person's city.

      A big problem with social media is assuming that all social media (or possibly any) is helpful for a specific goal. Facebook may not be all that effective here.
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  • Profile picture of the author PBMax
    Facebook is a beast, but that "beast" may be a dinosaur - especially for your client. I manage multiple FB pages and do ads, but even though I get real* likes from those ads, the engagement is low. You have to pay for engagement on top of the likes.

    (* There's a nasty rumor that Facebook either has a stockpile of dead accts they feed you random likes from mixed in with real ones OR they also use 3rd party like services. The only way to get around this is to hyper-target your client's neighborhood/service area. It will be expensive. $50 may get you 20-30 likes a month. Upside? Your client's a lawyer, ergo, charges outrageous fees. He only needs 1 or 2 leads from that...)
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  • Profile picture of the author partyfavor
    I would stay clear away from buying likes. It's just not worth it. Either dummy accounts or even real people that just don't get the reach anyways.

    Use the ads to target a specific problem, and get those people to engage. So the ad isn't for likes, it's for post engage,ent or website clicks.

    IE an ad could be: had a traffic accident, click here for a free consultation, and one free week of massage for your pain. (Something like that) > they click over to a landing page to give their info > lawyer gets the lead and calls to close.

    Boom. FB works
    Lol
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  • Profile picture of the author partyfavor
    Also, I'd use the $50 as a test for one week, and if a few leads come in tell the lawyer to man up and spend some real money on ads LOL.

    Not a ton, but $10 a day can do wonders. $50 will gt something but im sure as a lawyer he charges a pretty penny, so pay up some ad dollars to do it right and he can be swimming in dollars.

    I spend $600 a month on ads, get 30-45 leads a month, and my coaching is $3-5k for a month. I have zero issues spending $600 to get in 9-15k in monthly sales. And that's on bad months with low close rates.

    Why save money with only $50, use it to test and then scale up!
    Imagine him asking the radio station for just one ad please. Run it once. Hehehe
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  • Profile picture of the author Rendition
    I will definitely budget for engagement on the posts (promoting posts). But the client also wants to see "likes" grow, so i need to put at least some budget into paying for likes. Would it be better to buy a small number of fake followers each month (instead of Facebook ad likes, something like fiverr barf), and just pay for engagement? Or to put 25 into engagement/ 25 into local targeted likes, or increase the ad budget from my cut to 80, and put 40 into engagement, and 40 into targeted likes?

    I hear you about Facebook being hard for a lawyer page, but the lawyer nonetheless wants a growing Facebook presence. Because he targets clients in his specific area, I will be targeting the ads very specifically by demographic and area, which I know will get expensive especially since its in the states.

    Another note, I will also be managing his twitter. I plan on manually growing that by simply engaging and following people, but does anyone have experience with Twitter ads or other methods?

    Thanks again!
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  • Profile picture of the author partyfavor
    Well, just by promoting the post he will get likes to his page residually. I don't think there is a need to specifically advertise likes to his page. It's not like anyone 'wants to follow a lawyer'. I can't see anyone following just because... BUT creating a goal, like leads by using an offer or something like that can work, has value, and will give him results.

    Just explain that likes aren't his goal, leads are even if you bought thousands of fake likes on fiver, what would be the point. They are useless to him, never will buy, and just look nice. Why would he what that?

    Think about this, in your original al post you mentioned the previous company clearly bought fake likes, and now he is working with you - so clearly not happy with the results. So don't follow the same path.

    What type of law does he practice?
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  • Profile picture of the author miklanderson2
    Like campaigns probably aren't going to do much good for a bankruptcy lawyer. Most people only use a lawyer like this one time in their lives and then they never need them again. You might be able to get people to like the page, but those likes won't drum up new business.

    Instead, I'd recommend looking at the types of people who are most likely to need a bankruptcy lawyer and run Facebook ads to those people advertising the lawyers service and maybe offering some sort of deal if they tell him they saw his ad on Facebook. $50 a month really isn't going to get you very far. You can use that up testing a single campaign and still not have enough data to go on.

    I'd imagine law campaigns on Facebook dont get a whole lot of engagement, unless you can figure out an angle that will get people engaged. If not, expect to pay a lot per click for your ads...
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  • Profile picture of the author Rendition
    So do you think I should use all the $50 on post promotions, promoting posts that give special offers? Or alternatively, I was considering doing $30 into advertisements for likes, and the other $20 doing a $5 post promotion each week.

    After the first month the lawyer is willing to throw in several hundred more into advertising and promotion of the social outlets. So I just need to figure out the best way to split test things really.

    I sure appreciate the responses folks.
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    • Profile picture of the author partyfavor
      Originally Posted by Rendition View Post

      So do you think I should use all the $50 on post promotions, promoting posts that give special offers? Or alternatively, I was considering doing $30 into advertisements for likes, and the other $20 doing a $5 post promotion each week.

      After the first month the lawyer is willing to throw in several hundred more into advertising and promotion of the social outlets. So I just need to figure out the best way to split test things really.

      I sure appreciate the responses folks.
      For the budget, I'd forget spending any money looking for likes. Zero of it.
      Spend all $50 on pushing an offer. By using the FB Page to make the post, you will get likes added on indirectly. But the more important goal is getting leads, so spend all $50 on an offer. Then the result is there and he will add to the budget right away.
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  • Profile picture of the author DelilahTaylor
    This client is going to do better with a personal page.....organic engagement is waaaaaaay higher!!
    The client can make written post with little tips about bankruptcy, hold an open house event at the office and give a free talk about bankruptcy law, have potential clients contact through FB Chat and keep the $50 for lunch, haha
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    • Profile picture of the author partyfavor
      Originally Posted by DelilahTaylor View Post

      This client is going to do better with a personal page.....organic engagement is waaaaaaay higher!!
      The client can make written post with little tips about bankruptcy, hold an open house event at the office and give a free talk about bankruptcy law, have potential clients contact through FB Chat and keep the $50 for lunch, haha
      I'd advise against a personal profile for a his case.
      You will need to search out and find friends and add them in order to get that reach (where are you going to find people that need a lawyer at the right time and make sure they approve the friend invite? Too much work and not effective) and the worst part is you can't do any effective ads as a personal profile. Nothing is scalable.

      With an actual FB page, you can use ads to target an audience that is interested in the lawyers service and drum up business easily. Personal there is zero way to do that.
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  • Profile picture of the author miklanderson2
    I would use the money on promotion as opposed to likes. I can't imagine there would be too many people liking a bankruptcy lawyer's page on Facebook. Most people don't want to announce their financial troubles to the world.

    I think the biggest problem you're going to have is testing with that small of a budget. I spend that much on some of my campaigns in a couple hour's time during the testing phase.

    I can't imagine $50 for a month is going to get you very far, especially when the cost per click is probably going to be fairly high. I'd sit down with the lawyer and explain to him how Facebook actually works and let him know $50 isn't a realistic amount for testing.
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  • Profile picture of the author Robert Jackson Jr
    I came to this thread hoping to find a Facebook Advertising product suggestion. I, too, have a lawyer that is a client and he wants to explore Facebook marketing for his practice. Interesting that he also specializes in bankruptcy and divorce.

    Very good suggestions from the community,
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    • Profile picture of the author ruebenchigaru
      Originally Posted by Rendition View Post

      So do you think I should use all the $50 on post promotions, promoting posts that give special offers? Or alternatively, I was considering doing $30 into advertisements for likes, and the other $20 doing a $5 post promotion each week.

      After the first month the lawyer is willing to throw in several hundred more into advertising and promotion of the social outlets. So I just need to figure out the best way to split test things really.

      I sure appreciate the responses folks.
      For a lawyer I would focus on direct lead generation instead of building likes or engagement ads. Law is not a sexy niche and not social media friendly, especially bankruptcy law. No one wants to share with their friends that they are going to see a bankruptcy lawyer.

      The best strategy would be a clicks to website ad that goes to a landing page (Leadpages/ Instapages, etc.) to collect the persons details with a tracking phone number for leads to call in as well. Make sure the landing page is mobile optimized because most of your leads will come from mobile phones.

      Originally Posted by Robert Jackson Jr View Post

      I came to this thread hoping to find a Facebook Advertising product suggestion. I, too, have a lawyer that is a client and he wants to explore Facebook marketing for his practice. Interesting that he also specializes in bankruptcy and divorce.

      Very good suggestions from the community,
      There is a course called The Broad Targeting Formula, I forget who it's by, (Jeremy I think) but, there's very good case study on generating leads from Facebook ads using the strategy I mentioned above. He did it for a divorce lawyer and I have personally done it for personal injury lawyers and divorce lawyers as well.

      BTW $50 per month just won't cut it, you will need to spend that much just to test your images, headline, UPS and call to action. Your client need to determine how much a lead with worth to him/her and increase the budget accordingly.

      Hope it helps.
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  • Profile picture of the author chrisv24
    I haven't worked with a lawyer before but I have worked with an accountant and tax is pretty dull as well so hopefully I can offer you some help.

    1. Make content updates visual - something that worked really well for me was producing infographics around certain topics. e.g. what expenses you can claim. Have a think about law and see what you could do.

    2. Q&A. Promote the page as a customer service and enquiry portal. You could have people send in their questions and get a lawyer to post responses.

    3. Produce FAQ content

    Those are a couple of ideas. I'd have a look at other lawyer and professional services pages to see what they do.
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  • Profile picture of the author Rendition
    Thanks for all the great feedback everyone. I have spoken with the lawyer and we are increasing the advertising budget for Facebook to $300 per month. Not much, but a start.

    I am planning on putting $150 into split testing and like campaigns for the first month, and the remaining $150 into post promotions.

    Interesting what everyone is mentioning about lead generation. But the lawyer is already very successful with ample leads, and their Facebook page is more a status thing for them than a method of lead generation. He is heavily competitive with lawyers in his locality, and just wants more targeted likes than his competitors. Basically to show them up with his Facebook presence. So its not really an issue of lead generation, more an issue of pride as he just wants to have more likes than his competitors.. But they should still be targeted hence the ad campaigns (since I'm pretty sure he checks occasionally to make sure they are targeted to his state at least).
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    • Profile picture of the author Michael Shook
      Originally Posted by Rendition View Post

      Thanks for all the great feedback everyone. I have spoken with the lawyer and we are increasing the advertising budget for Facebook to $300 per month. Not much, but a start.

      I am planning on putting $150 into split testing and like campaigns for the first month, and the remaining $150 into post promotions.

      Interesting what everyone is mentioning about lead generation. But the lawyer is already very successful with ample leads, and their Facebook page is more a status thing for them than a method of lead generation. He is heavily competitive with lawyers in his locality, and just wants more targeted likes than his competitors. Basically to show them up with his Facebook presence. So its not really an issue of lead generation, more an issue of pride as he just wants to have more likes than his competitors.. But they should still be targeted hence the ad campaigns (since I'm pretty sure he checks occasionally to make sure they are targeted to his state at least).
      This looks like a good plan. You probably already know that your ad price is going to drop and your reach increase, the more engagement you get. So if you create posts that feature other things in addition to legal stuff, you will probably get higher engagement.
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  • Profile picture of the author etong
    I agree with one of the comments stating FB may not be the best place for lawyers, especially bankruptcy. Think about it, would you want your friends to know you're looking into bankruptcy...if you like a page your friends will see it on their newsfeed.

    Anyways, if your client still want to pursue the page route...

    Here is what I recommend:

    1. Create a new page. Those fake likes will not only hurt your organic reach, they will lower your quality score. Many people don't realize that FB now has some type of quality score for advertisers and pages...similar to Google. If the page is full of fake likes and no engagements...be prepare to pay more for clicks. Fact is you're building on a Page that is already bad.

    2. Create a lead generation funnel. Just getting likes is not enough. You need likes from people who are interested in what you are offering. Create a free lead magnet that will target people specifically interested in your product/service. The lead magnet will filter out those people who are not interested in your service in the first place. For example, you can create an ebook related to the process of avoiding a messy bankruptcy proceedings...I don't know much about bankruptcy law, but you get the idea. The lead magnet should be something the prospect would "crawl over broken glass" for. The lead magnet will not only help get the page more likes, but more targeted likes...more targeted, more engagement...but then again, do you think a lot of people will engage something related to bankruptcy...remember, their friends will likely see that engagement on their feed. Of course there's more to the funnel, but I can't cover everything in this post.

    3. Getting likes for the sake of getting likes and boosting their ego is ridiculous...I wanted to say something worst...but anyways. People are not dumb. When someone lands on the page and see all those likes but no engagement, they will know something is wrong...in this case having a page is actually hurting your client. The solution is getting more targeted likes, and you can only get that by providing high quality value.

    I did a post on my blog about creating effective FB ads. I'll post it here....

    Here are 7 steps to create kick-ass Facebook Ads.

    1. Know Your Target Market
    This first step is the most important. If you don’t have a clear picture of who your target market (or your customer avatar) are, you will waste a lot of money, so get this right before you move on to the next steps.

    The power of Facebook lies in the data it has on it’s users.

    By matching your customer avatar to Facebook’s targeting options, you will be able to create more relevant, engaging contents and effective Ads.

    The basic info you need to know about your target market:

    1. Gender
    2. Age
    3. Interests
    4. Behaviors
    4. Location

    2. Drive Targeted “Likes” With “Page Like” Ads
    Some people think running “Page Like” Ads are useless since Facebook lowered the organic reach of page posts. Don’t believe this way of thinking.

    People who like your page are more likely to buy from you…period.

    Those who are discounting “Page Like” Ads are those who don’t know their customer avatar…so, they are blindly targeting people.

    Think of your Facebook Page like a brick and mortar store front. People who walk by, stop and comes into the store have some interest in what you have to offer. This doesn’t mean that they will buy right then and there, or at all. But the fact that they visited your store show interest.

    This is similar to someone “Liking” your Page. A person “Liking” your Page express interest.

    3. Increase Engagement By Creating Relevant and Valuable Content
    Since Facebook lower organic reach of Page posts, it is more important now to create engaging contents.

    The more engaging your contents are the bigger the reach.

    Your content should make people stop while scrolling their newsfeed…this is what Facebook calls “thumbstopper”.

    In order to create engaging contents, you have to know your customer avatar…their age, gender, interests, behaviors, etc.

    A great way to highlight a highly engaging posts is to “Pin It” to the top of the page.

    4. Run promoted post Ads
    Push content into people’s newsfeed by running Promoted Post Ads.

    You can do this by “Boosting” the post on the Page…or (I prefer) using the Ad Manager or Power Editor.

    The Ad Manager will give you more targeting options than just “Boosting” …and the Power Editor will give you more option than the Ad Manager.

    95% of what you need in running effective Ads on Facebook you can do with the Ad Manager. If you want more advanced options then use the Power Editor.

    With all the changes with organic reach, it’s a necessity now to run Promoted Post Ads.

    5. Run Video Ads
    Video are getting more exposure now then ever before. You have probably noticed an increase in videos on your newsfeed. This is intentional. Facebook is putting a lot of effort in making it a video destination as well.

    Creating engaging videos and running Video Ads will help with branding, build trust, and differentiate you from others (because most people shy away from videos). Videos have a higher perceived value to prospects.

    6. Use Advertorials
    Advertorials are also referred to as Native Advertising.

    Advertorials are more content based than the usual “direct response” marketing Ads.

    Gone are the days where you can send visitors directly to a “direct response” landing pages with Facebook Ads.

    Facebook’s main focus is good user experience, and in order to achieve this, they want quality contents on their platform.

    Sending people directly to an opt in form or hard-sell sales letter does not work anymore. Facebook will disapprove and even ban accounts if you try to run this type of Ads.

    What you need to do: Send visitors to a valuable and relevant content, and within that content drive them to a marketing funnel.

    7. Retargeting
    Retargeting is the biggest rage in online advertising right now.

    What is retargeting?

    Basically, retargeting allows you to display Ads to people who had visited your site or offer.

    For example, if people visits your sales page, but didn’t buy, then you can run an Ad to target those visitors with a special discount to entice them to make the purchase.


    Hope this help. Good luck!
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